Summary of “Can an apple cider vinegar a day keep the doctor away?”

It’s a new twist on “An apple a day” which has caught the imagination of health-conscious millennials, celebrity food bloggers and A-listers such as Jennifer Aniston, Katy Perry and Victoria Beckham.
Apple cider vinegar is enjoying a huge revival in the UK as a kitchen cupboard staple, hailed by the “Clean-eating” generation as the latest wonder ingredient which can be knocked back daily as a general tonic.
Already a cult product in the US, its new-found popularity on this side of the Atlantic is giving an unexpected boost to the UK apple industry, where reliance on imported fruit has led to hundreds of traditional varieties gradually disappearing.
Practising what he preaches is entrepreneur William Chase, who describes his own apple cider vinegar as “a modern take on a legendary product”.
The founder of Tyrrells crisps and Chase Vodka has now moved into a sphere that he calls “Fit foods”, launching his own Willy’s apple cider vinegar – manufactured on his Herefordshire farm – last year.
“We are using tiny crab apples which would otherwise have been wasted, and among 48 apple varieties from our 300-year-old orchards. We have 50 acres but we need to make more cider to meet demand, so we are looking for other farms with older orchards to help provide us with the apples we need.” Chase, who was criticised by trading standards for the health claims he made on his launch labelling, says he has lost two stone and reduced his own cholesterol as a result of regular consumption.
The grocery chain Waitrose reports that sales of the products are up more than 60% year-on-year, with Willy’s ACV and Aspall’s Apple Cyder Vinegar leading the charge.
Mel Leyshon, editor of the Healthy Food Guide, admitted there were many unsubstantiated claims for apple cider vinegar, “One of them being that it can help you lose weight, but there are no studies to prove this. But drinking a glass of diluted apple cider vinegar before a meal may help fill you up so you eat less. A better idea is to get into the habit of eating more salads with a light dressing made using apple cider vinegar – that way you can get your five a day, too”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why local US newspapers are sounding the alarm”

In the past decade, hundreds of local US newspapers have closed or merged.
In early June, Dave Krieger got on stage in the Chautauqua auditorium to tell the city’s residents why he got fired from the local newspaper – and why he’s worried about the future of local news in the US. Boulder isn’t an average American town – the city of 100,000 has multiple federal research centres, a growing tech scene and a median single-family home price above $1m – but its daily newspaper is following a path of decline that many local news outlets have trod already – some all the way to closure.
“When local papers cut coverage there’s essentially nothing to take its place in these local communities,” he says, adding while there have been many online local news experiments they tend to be in already media-rich environments or not as focused on public affairs.
Local news sets the agenda for public debates by bringing particular issues to public attention, encourages regional business development by connecting local businesses with local residents and can reflect what’s similar or different about a national problem on the local level, she says.
While technological and economic forces have done a number on local newspapers, some are still surviving, largely on loyal subscribers and a lack of true competition at the local level.
There’s been no mass replacement of local newspapers.
As of 2011, all news radio stations cover only 40% of the US. Local TV stations often have similar staff sizes as newspapers but cover a larger area, often focusing on weather, sports and individual cases of crime.
Local news in the US is on the decline – so how do you stay informed about your hometown?

The orginal article.

Summary of “How LeBron James’ decision instantly changed Los Angeles Lakers, Cleveland Cavaliers and NBA”

In a few hours, the NBA would learn where LeBron James had decided to spend the next phase of his NBA career, and Buss’ Lakers had emerged as the favorites to sign him.
Change the culture, give the franchise a facelift, then get two of the biggest Lakers stars of the past four decades – Magic and Kobe – to help recruit the best player of his era, LeBron James.
During the season, Lue and James texted constantly about the team or how James was feeling as he averaged 38.0 minutes per game over the 104 games the Cavs played.
As columnist Marla Ridenour wrote in the Akron Beacon Journal on July 2: “I thought my heart was protected. I thought I was prepared for LeBron James to leave Cleveland again. … As James heads to the Los Angeles Lakers, I was overcome by the feeling that the most awe-inspiring moments I have witnessed in my 41-year career might be behind me.”
Ramona Shelburne shares what signing LeBron James means to Lakers president and co-owner Jeanie Buss after 18 tumultuous months for the franchise.
LAKERS’ COACH LUKE Walton had started thinking about what it would be like to coach James a few weeks earlier, as he prepared for his role in a pitch meeting, should James grant one to the Lakers.
LeBron James has officially joined the Los Angeles Lakers.
His lifetime Nike deal no longer includes the famed “Major market” clause, but the business of LeBron James will see a boost from his move to Los Angeles.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Just how meaningful is coincidence, beyond the statistics?”

The young poet might have been wishful in his thinking, but such a statement also raises the question of how we should grapple with mysteries – with or without a belief in a greater meaning to life? Even if every possible coincidence could be scientifically explained, we shouldn’t necessarily discount its importance.
Must these ideas therefore be incompatible? Indeed, might the continued belief in meaningful coincidences even be rational and necessary to our experience of existing in the world? And, is a belief in meaningful coincidences something vital to our survival as humans?
‘ Admittedly, trying to find a scientific basis for believing in meaningful coincidence is not a widespread pursuit.
Like a religious person, the greatest asset to believing in meaningful coincidence is that you cannot prove that something is devoid of meaning since ‘meaning’ is not scientifically testable.
Cynically, one could reason that trying to add a scientific patina to the belief in meaningful coincidence is driven by greed: there will always be money to be made in writing books about or giving talks that exploit people’s desire to see chance coincidences as significant.
A belief in meaningful coincidence is, from an existential perspective, surprisingly rational.
What so much of the question around meaningful coincidence comes down to is how you choose to fill the vacuum of life’s mysteries.
Beneath the statistical incorrectness, beneath any economic ploys, beneath even the potentially grave errors that can result, a belief in meaningful coincidence is, from an existential perspective, surprisingly rational.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Master’s Twist on Making Ice Cream in a Plastic Bag”

At a dinner party I attended recently, when one of the hosts-an artist friend, who can be a little loopy-announced, as we cleared our plates of lamb tagine, that she was going to whip up some ice cream for dessert, I was skeptical.
Making ice cream typically involves not only a machine but more than a day of preparation: you have to pre-chill the machine’s cannister overnight in the freezer, prepare your base-often a custard that you’ve cooked on the stovetop and let cool in the fridge-and then allow the machine to churn and freeze it for twenty minutes or so before putting it in the freezer for several hours to let it fully solidify.
Plenty of people have devised ways of getting around using a machine; plenty of people made ice cream before the machine was invented.
The food-science whiz J. Kenji Lopez-Alt has a recipe that involves making a custard, combining it with fresh-whipped cream, freezing the mixture in ice-cube trays, and then food-processing the frozen cubes with more cream; it’s perfect for anyone who cares about getting her “Overrun all the way down to 24%.” The popular “No-churn” technique, perhaps easiest of all, calls for a quart of heavy cream, whipped into soft peaks, and a can of condensed milk, poured into a loaf pan and left to freeze-though, as Lopez-Alt points out, this is really more of a mousse, as smooth as ice cream but with an airier, chewier texture that will be familiar to anyone who has ever enjoyed a frozen container of Cool Whip.
A few weeks ago, at Una Pizza Napoletana, a restaurant on the Lower East Side, I ate a spectacular vanilla ice cream made by Fabian von Hauske Valtierra, one of the chefs there.
He doesn’t use eggs, he explained, because he wants it to taste purely of milk and cream, and he doesn’t heat his dairy for the same reason: to maintain the “Fresh flavor that you get straight from the jug.” He never lets his ice cream freeze for more than half a day, serving each batch only on the day it’s made; after that, you lose some of the flavor.
He’d never tried the bag method, he said, but he thought he’d maybe seen his mom do it, and he’d definitely seen double-chambered plastic balls, designed for kids and camping trips, that allow you, ingeniously, to churn ice cream by playing catch or soccer.
Pour the milk-and-cream mixture into the sandwich-size ziplock, seal it tightly, getting as much air out of the bag as possible, and put it inside the gallon-size ziplock, jostling it a little so that it’s surrounded by the ice and salt.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Packing Tips From One-Bag Travel Fanatics”

So we scoured the internet to assemble great packing tips for everybody from the one-bag community.
Use packing cubes, even if you think you’re already an organized packer.
Ikea’s Forfina travel bags are $7.99 for a set of six, making them great for those who want to try packing cubes before committing to anything pricier.
Just make sure you’ve thought it through: One traveler who packed a minimal rotation of shirts didn’t realize he’d be pairing a khaki shirt with khaki pants and said he spent every third day of his trip dressed like a zookeeper.
As a general rule, a piece of luggage will lose more packing space with every added pair of wheels.
If you’re paying to check a 25-inch suitcase, you can probably get down to a 22-inch carry-on travel pack.
Thankfully, travel packs have evolved past top-loading hiking gear that screams “I’m spending my gap year in hostels!” Now they’re essentially frameless, soft suitcases from sporty to chic, many with padded laptop compartments and stowable straps.
A good back- or shoulder-carry pack offers maximum space and has a supportive strap system, locking YKK zippers, water- and rip-resistant fabric, and thoughtful organization features.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Slime Molds Remember”

Research into the behavior of protozoa such as the slime mold Physarum polycephalum suggests that these seemingly simple organisms are capable of complex decision-making and problem-solving within their environments.
Nakagaki and his colleagues have shown, for example, that slime molds are capable of solving maze problems and laying out distribution networks as efficient as ones designed by humans.
Chris Reid and his colleague Simon Garnier, who heads the Swarm Lab at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, are working on the mechanism behind how a slime mold transfers information between all of its parts to act as a kind of collective that mimics the capabilities of a brain full of neurons.
Each tiny part of the slime mold contracts and expands over the course of about one minute, but the contraction rate is linked to the quality of the local environment.
Using computer vision techniques and experiments that might be likened to a slime mold version of an MRI brain scan, the researchers are examining how the slime mold uses this mechanism to transfer information around its giant unicellular body and make complex decisions between conflicting stimuli.
He is not persuaded that Dussutour’s experiment with slime molds staying habituated to salt after extended dormancy shows much.
To Fred Kaijzer, a cognitive scientist at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, the question of whether these interesting behaviors show that slime molds can learn is similar to the debate over whether Pluto is a planet: The answer depends as much on how the concept of learning is cast as on the empirical evidence.
“Slime mold researchers insist that functionally equivalent behavior observed in the slime mold should use the same descriptive terms as for brained animals, while classical neuroscientists insist that the very definition of learning and intelligence requires a neuron-based architecture,” he said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Mentor Someone Who Doesn’t Know What Their Career Goals Should Be”

“Tell me about your career goals.” How often have you said this to a person you’re managing or mentoring, only to get a blank stare in return? Perhaps the person confides that they don’t know what their goals should be, or even whether there are opportunities to advance at your company.
The results of CEB’s 2015 employee survey capture the problem well: 70% of employees surveyed reported being dissatisfied with career opportunities at their company – a disturbing figure given that it is one of the biggest drivers of engagement and retention.
We’d like to propose a radical diagnosis: The problem lives not in a lack of career opportunities, but rather in the very concept of a career.
We are suffering from the career myth – a delusional belief in the outdated idea of linear career progression.
Let’s return to the employee who needs direction and feels stuck and confused about their career.
First, we tell employees that it is fine and even preferable not to have a concrete career path in mind.
Rather than investing in one path, we tell employees, they should diversify their career capital.
The scary thing about accepting the career myth is acknowledging that you don’t know what comes next.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 great long-distance cycle routes in Europe: readers’ tips”

The route is well-signposted and uses a mix of dedicated cycle paths and minor roads.
Get the ferry to the Hook of Holland or Rotterdam and pick up the Eurovelo 2 cycle trail, also called the Capitals Route.
For €30 a day we rented excellent bikes from cyclingamalfi.com – they have a choice of trekkers or e-bikes including locks, helmets, kits and panniers and give advice on routes, too.
It may not be a long distance for some but the 127 miles from Dieppe to Paris provide a beautiful few days’ cycling.
The most famous route is the Avenue Verte, but the best route has been pioneered by Donald Hirsch.
Donald’s route takes you to the left, so you never see what’s at the end of the road. But it’s worth cycling on to investigate.
If you’re looking for an introduction to cycle touring the 100-mile Baie de Somme route is the perfect way to explore this underrated region.
The cycling is easy throughout and a self-guided route with Belle France is easy to follow with comprehensive maps and notes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet the people bringing Japanese video games to life in English”

The company, named after the final level of Super Mario Bros, specialises in repackaging Japanese video games for English-speaking audiences, or vice versa.
John Ricciardi, executive director and co-founder of 8-4, adds that it is satisfying when people feel the firm has contributed so much to a game that they talk about it.
Ricciardi estimates such games can be year-long projects, with up to 10 people working on them.
In the English-speaking world, a lot of attention is paid to the localisation of Japanese games.
8-4 does the reverse as well: helping games created in English get in front of Japanese audiences.
“A lot of indie developers grew up playing Japanese games: that’s where they got their inspiration and what made them happy as a kid,” says Ricciardi.
“We often hear, ‘I realise these games might not sell that well in Japan but I just want to give back’, or ‘I want to see my game out in the place that was magical to me as a kid growing up’.”
“There are a lot of ugly fonts and weird decisions because there is not a lot of education and it is a hard thing to do. Some games are just machine translated, which is really bad.”.

The orginal article.