Summary of “The First Lesson of Marriage 101: There Are No Soul Mates”

Nowadays, when colleges and universities offer courses on the topic of marriage, rather than explicitly offering practical marriage advice, they often survey the institution of marriage from a historical point of view or look at larger sociological trends.
Today’s marriage education classes are most often aimed at high-school students, usually as part of a home economics or health class, where teens are taught how family structure affects child well-being, learn basic relationship and communication skills, or are required to carry around a sack filled with flour for a week so they can learn what is entailed in being responsible for a baby 24 hours a day.
Other courses are taught at specifically religious colleges, or are meant for engaged couples, like Pre-Cana, a marriage prep course required of all couples desiring to marry in a Catholic church.
Northwestern’s Marriage 101 is unique among liberal arts universities in offering a course that is comprehensively and directly focused on the experiential, on self-exploration: on walking students through the actual practice of learning to love well.
While popular culture often depicts love as a matter of luck and meeting the right person, after which everything effortlessly falls into place, learning how to love another person well, Solomon explains, is anything but intuitive.
“The foundation of our course is based on correcting a misconception: that to make a marriage work, you have to find the right person. The fact is, you have to be the right person,” Solomon declares.
To help students recognize what has shaped their views on love, she and her colleagues have students extensively interview their own parents about their own relationship.
Maddy Bloch, who took the course two years ago along with her boyfriend at the time, learned a lot when she interviewed her own parents about their own marriage, despite the fact that they are divorced.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jannie Duncan: “Beautiful Human” or Fugitive Killer?”

More than 12 years after Jannie Duncan walked off the grounds of a mental hospital and into a new identity, Debbie Carliner opened a newspaper and got the shock of her life.
The article reported that Joan’s real name was Jannie Duncan.
At the trial that autumn, the government’s star witness, 25-year-old Carl Winchester, a friend of one of Jannie’s employees, testified that Jannie had pointed a gun at Orell and pulled the trigger several times, but it never fired.
By December 1974, he had taken up with another woman named Jannie – Jannie Dodd, according to the Post.
On January 2, FBI agent Stanley Niemala drove to Magnolia Gardens, the apartment complex in Arlington where Jannie Duncan lived.
Judge Joseph McGarraghy refused to allow testimony or evidence about Jannie’s IRS history, and the jury apparently accepted the contention – introduced by the police within days of Orell’s death, repeated frequently in newspapers, and advanced by the prosecution – that Jannie was furious at Orell for snitching.
In February 1975, a group of 30-plus people formed the Jannie Duncan Freedom Committee, raising money and circulating a petition seeking her release; they collected 5,000 signatures.
Jannie’s sole remaining close relative, a daughter now in her 60s, at first denied that Jannie was her mother.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When ‘Lord of the Rings’ Almost Starred Mick Jagger”

Forty years after his animated classic The Lord of the Rings hit theaters on Nov. 15, 1978, these are some of the things on diretor Ralph Bakshi’s mind during a candid conversation about what happened, and what could have been.
During the course of the ’60s, J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings books grew exponentially in popularity and was initially perceived as “An underground smash hit, especially with artists and cartoonists,” Bakshi says.
Peter Bogdanavich happened to be pitching a project with the studio head behind closed doors, but Bakshi talked his way into the office and dangled the rights to Rings in front of them.
As Bakshi’s animation company was winding up Wizards, a whole division was established to develop The Lord of the Rings.
Given all the tap dancing required to effectively merge the vocals with the performances, Bakshi was least concerned about precisely syncing them together: “In animation I could shift the track; all they had to do was come close enough,” continues Bakshi.
” Bakshi approached the band to use their music as the soundtrack to the film and he says they responded with an enthusiastic “absolutely!” But according to Bakshi, producer Zaentz, which owned Fantasy Records, couldn’t get the music rights, as the top-selling band’s contract prevented them from working for another label.
“So I get a call from Mick Jagger – he wanted to come up and see what we were doing on Rings,” recalls Bakshi.
A key criticism of Bakshi’s Rings final cut was the fact that the story simply ends after the battle of Helm’s Deep, with a narrative voiceover explaining, “as their gallant battle ended, so too ends the first great tale of The Lord of the Rings.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Diet Culture Exists to Fight Off the Fear of Death”

Human self-awareness means that, from a relatively early age, we are also aware of death.
Even for people in extreme poverty, for whom survival is a more immediate concern, the cultural meanings of food remain critical.
It is not a coincidence that the survival function of food is buried beneath all of this-who wants to think about staving off death each time they tuck into a bowl of cereal? Forgetting about death is the entire point of food culture.
Diet culture and its variations, such as clean eating, are cultural structures we have built to attempt to transcend our animality.
We seek variety and novelty, and at the same time, we carry an innate fear of food.
The omnivore’s paradox was originally defined by psychological researcher Paul Rozin as the anxiety that arises from our desire to try new foods paired with our inherited fear of unknown foods that could turn out to be toxic.
If it weren’t for the small chance of death lurking behind every food choice and every dietary ideology, choosing what to eat from a crowded marketplace wouldn’t be considered a dilemma.
Everyone would be just a little bit calmer about food.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The truth about time management: how I went from chaos to punctual calm in one week”

She says, is never entirely unchosen: when you are always 17 minutes late for everything, constantly procrastinating because you don’t even want to start looking for a vital scrap of paper in case you can’t find it, it feels like a triumph every time you are punctual.
The principle of time is like the principle of space.
“The biggest obstacle we have to organising time is our perception of it,” Morgenstern says.
On Saturday, I hit the Gordian knot: I couldn’t organise anything bigger than my coat because I didn’t have time and I couldn’t organise my time until I had done my space.
“A day is a limited amount of time. We have 24 hours. You’re sleeping eight hours. Let’s say you’re spending 10 hours at work; you have six hours of personal time. If you plan more than will fit, you’re just shoving things in. That haphazard arrangement, like a closet, becomes chaotic and intimidating. You don’t even look at your to-do list, you’re just freestyling, because you already know your day is impossible.”
“It’s very important; it comes out of eight years of research. How much time and attention do kids need to feel loved and secure? The answer is this: short bursts of five to 15 minutes of truly undivided attention delivered consistently – not big blocks of time delivered erratically.”
Sod it, borrow Morgernstern’s: “I’d love to do it, but my time is accounted for right now.” If it makes you sound like a robot with an American motherboard, the upside is that at least you reply to people fast, rather than leaving them hanging for six weeks, agreeing, then pulling out at the last minute, which is my current MO. By Tuesday, I knew not only what that day held, but more or less the entire week: I knew that I was free to go on a school trip with my daughter.
I am deviating here from the time-management point, but if you think of Holbein’s core message as being that all things will crumble to dust and that the only everlasting truth is death, it brings us back neatly to Morgenstern: “How we spend our time is how we spend our life. This couldn’t be more important.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Three Feet From God: An Oral History of Nirvana ‘Unplugged'”

We were out on tour for a few days and started to get to know the guys, started to get to know Kurt, and then one evening he said they were gonna do the Unplugged thing.
We had told the camera guys and everyone, “Don’t approach the band. If you have any questions come to us and we’ll talk to them. One person can talk to Kurt. No one else can talk to Kurt.” And Juan got off the camera and I’m in the control room, and all of the sudden I see Juan walking up to Kurt and I was like, “What is he doing? What is he doing?” And he just asked him a question about something camera-related, and Kurt politely answered him, and he went back to his camera.
Cross: Kurt is leading every moment and every gesture in a way that you don’t observe when you watch a Nirvana show that’s electric.
It’s not like every single moment is focused on Kurt at a live Nirvana concert.
Coletti: Nothing about the show, minus the fact that Kurt died shortly thereafter, has a funeral vibe.
McCarthy-Miller: After the show they had Kurt come into the control room and look at some songs.
Finnerty: After the show, Courtney [Love] was out of town, and so we went back to the hotel, and we were just hanging at the bar, and Kurt was like, “I want to go upstairs and call Courtney.” And he’s like, “I’m really bummed. I feel like nobody liked it. It was really bad.” I was like, “Oh my God, you’re out of your mind.” I walked him up to the room.
If there’s an entry point to who Kurt Cobain was as a songwriter and a singer, Unplugged is that.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Ways Smart People Sabotage Their Success”

Smart people sometimes devalue other skills, like relationship building, and over-concentrate on intellect.
Very smart people sometimes see their success as inevitable because of their intellect, and don’t see other skills as important.
Smart people also sometimes find it difficult to delegate because of a sense they can do a task better This is especially likely for those who have a perfectionist streak.
Smart people often attach a lot of their self-esteem to being smart, which can decrease their resilience and lead to avoidance.
Solution: Take an objective view of the benefits of working with people who are, in some respects, smarter than you.
If you’re surrounding yourself with smart people, you’re doing something right.
Smart people sometimes see in-depth thinking and reflection as the solution to every problem.
Bright people are accustomed to succeeding through their thinking skills, but can sometimes overlook when a different approach would be more beneficial.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 38 Best Restaurants in America 2019”

They’re the places where I had especially meaningful aha moments, where I thought, “Of course New Mexican cuisine should be lauded,” or “Absolutely this is the one Korean barbecue restaurant where everyone should eat,” or “It’s crazy how perfectly these Pakistani-Texan dishes summarize the heart of Houston dining.” The bleeding-edge vanguards among this crew include a Los Angeles maverick where the chef grafts cuisines from around the world with astounding grace, a San Antonio barbecue upstart ushering Mexican flavors to the forefront, and America’s most impactful Southern restaurant – which happens to be in Seattle.
Each of these restaurants cooks American food; I can’t imagine our dining landscape without them.
In restaurants, New Mexican cuisine boils down to the quality of two dominant chile sauces: the dusky, fruity, slightly spicy red variation, made from dried pods, and the chunkier, vegetal roasted green chile version.
Park’s BBQ Los Angeles In America, the meaty magnetism of Korean barbecue restaurants often serves as a gateway to the country’s cuisine.
Smyth & the Loyalist Chicago Chicago is a stronghold of tasting-menu restaurants all nearly on par in their intellectual heft.
Superiority Burger New York Brooks Headley departed from his top-of-the-food-chain gig as pastry chef at Del Posto in 2015 to channel his punk-musician origins into a solo project: a seditious, moshing, 270-square-foot Lower East Side restaurant that specializes in a remarkably gratifying vegetarian burger.
An unusually harmonic partnership animates the place: Chef couple Rita Sodi and Jody Williams each started still-successful restaurants nearby before combining forces on their joint darling.
Xochi Houston Each of Hugo Ortega and Tracy Vaught’s four Houston restaurants lend distinction to the world-class greatness of the city’s dining scene.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Quitting Instagram: She’s one of the millions disillusioned with social media. But she also helped create it.”

Richardson isn’t a bystander reckoning with the ills of technology: She was one of the 13 original employees working at Instagram in 2012 when Facebook bought the viral photo-sharing app for $1 billion.
With their exit, Richardson and other former Instagram employees worried Facebook would squash whatever independent identity the company had managed to retain.
Three of the early Instagram employees, including Richardson, have deleted it – permanently or periodically, comparing it to a drug that produces a diminishing high.
Ian Spalter, Instagram’s head of design, said in an interview that experiences on Instagram are subjective – one person’s frustration may be another person’s pleasure – and that the app was not designed to be a time-suck.
Three of the original 13 employees are still at Instagram or Facebook, according to Facebook.
Spalter, the Instagram design chief, pointed out that Instagram’s rapid growth has required the company to build tools that will assist people in finding posts and users.
Instagram is aware that its software was offering up too much celebrity content and content from people with large followings at the expense of posts from people who users know personally, according to Spalter, who joined Instagram in 2015.
She called up a friend from her Instagram days, and they concluded that Instagram no longer had value in their lives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Cost of Courage: The 2 Couples Who Rescued My Family From The Nazis”

In recent months, I’ve learned that my life is bound together with two families who took enormous risks to save my father and my grandparents from the Nazis.
One family, the Furstenbergs, has thrived; another, the Mynareks, is gone, seemingly without a trace.
My father, who had been rescued via the Kindertransport, was taken in by the Furstenberg family in Kalmar, Sweden.
Last year in March, a Swedish journalist and writer named Claes Furstenberg was digging through documents of his own family and came across some letters.
My father responded to Claes: Your grandfather Sigge Furstenberg saved my life.
Various members of the Furstenberg family have visited my dad and his wife, Frances, at their home in Manhattan.
We went back to the sprawling house where my dad lived as a foster brother with Claes’ dad, who was exactly my dad’s age – both boys were born in 1924.
I sent my dad photos of Claes and me in front of the house where he lived in Kalmar with Sigge and the family – the house that was his sanctuary.

The orginal article.