Summary of “Here Are the Cold and Flu Remedies That Actually Work”

Cold weather doesn’t literally make you sick, but the winter season does indeed make you more prone to catching a bad cold.
If you had time to rest, dammit, you wouldn’t be Googling around for quick cold remedies.
If you’re exposing innocent bystanders to your cold or flu, the least you can do is give yourself a good Purell rubdown after any contact between your hands and your mucus-y bits.
A glass shouldn’t make your cold symptoms any worse.
Speaking of Hot, Liquid Comfort: Soup Can’t Hurt There isn’t exactly concrete evidence that a bowl of chicken soup can make your cold shorter or less severe, but some studies do support its healing powers.
There’s no harm in a sinus rinse either, though you should make sure you’re using filtered water to avoid replacing your cold viruses with brain-eating amoebas.
Chances are good you have a cold or flu, which can’t be treated with antibiotics.
If your symptoms feel like a typical cold or flu, give yourself a few days to fight it off.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Take 100% Responsibility for Your Life”

It is your responsibility to put yourself into a peak state, every single day.
Why would you want to live any other way? Why would you want to drag yourself through the day and through your life?
Put yourself into a heightened state and then make some profound and committed decisions to move forward.
You already know within yourself that if you really want something, you’ll get it.
Every day you cause yourself to believe it even more by affirming to yourself that what you want is already true.
If you aren’t consistent with yourself, then you don’t love yourself.
Your desire to be viewed as consistent – firstly to others and then eventually to yourself – shifts how you see yourself.
You begin to see yourself based on the commitment you’ve made.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Guide to Strong Boundaries”

PSA: Setting strong personal boundaries are not a cure-all for your relationship woes.
People with high self-esteem have strong personal boundaries.
Practicing strong personal boundaries is one way to build self-esteem.
It’s a hallmark of a codependent relationship and usually represents two people incapable of strong personal boundaries.
It’s like an addiction they fulfill in one another, and when presented with emotionally healthy people to date, they usually feel bored or a lack of “Chemistry.” They’ll pass on healthy, secure individuals because the secure partner’s solid boundaries will not excite the loose emotional boundaries of the needy person.
A person with strong boundaries understands that it’s unreasonable to expect two people to accommodate each other 100% and fulfill every need the other has.
A person with strong boundaries understands that they may hurt someone’s feelings sometimes, but ultimately they can’t determine how other people feel.
A person with strong boundaries understands that a healthy relationship is not controlling one another’s emotions, but rather each partner supporting each other in their growth and path to self-actualization.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Japan can teach us about cleanliness”

As every day, the teacher’s final words: “OK everybody, today’s cleaning roster. Lines one and two will clean the classroom. Lines three and four, the corridor and stairs. And line five will clean the toilets.”
Most first-time visitors to Japan are struck by how clean the country is.
So they’re left with the question: how does Japan stay so clean?
“In our home life as well, parents teach us that it’s bad for us not to keep our things and our space clean.”
“I sometimes didn’t want to clean the school,” recalled freelance translator Chika Hayashi, “But I accepted it because it was part of our routine. I think having to clean the school is a very good thing because we learn that it’s important for us to take responsibility for cleaning the things and places that we use.”
In the Zen version of Buddhism, which came to Japan from China in the 12th and 13th Centuries, daily tasks like cleaning and cooking are considered spiritual exercises, no different from meditating.
So why aren’t all Buddhist nations as zealously clean as Japan? Well, long before the arrival of Buddhism, Japan already had its own indigenous religion: Shinto, said to enshrine the very soul of the Japanese identity.
“So it is vital to practice cleanliness. This purifies you and helps avoid bringing calamities to society. That is why Japan is a very clean country.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Rise of Anxiety Baking”

Young Americans’ long work hours might mean they’re less likely to come home every night in time to roast a chicken instead of ordering takeout, but many of them seem to have turned to weekend baking as a salve for the ambient anxiety of being alive in these times.
There’s a good reason for that: Baking actually can be really relaxing.
“People are afraid to spend money, and they’re feeling like shit. Baking is cheap, it’s easy, and it’s visceral.”
Folu Akinkuotu, a 28-year-old who lives in Boston and works in e-commerce-and someone whose impressive off-hours baking exploits I follow on social media-also started baking more in college as a way to make friends during her freshman year.
Alice Medrich, a baking expert and cookbook author, agrees that baking is a particularly effective activity for those whose professional lives exist mostly in the abstract.
In addition to the satisfaction of creating, the process of baking itself can be calming.
Buzzwords aside, baking does indeed force you to put down your phone, get your hands dirty, and pay close attention to what you’re doing.
If you’re more inclined toward cooking instead of baking, that can have some of the same positive effects, according to Muskin, but there’s something about dessert that’s just a little bit more fun.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 200 Best Songs of the 2010s”

“Cranes” is a soft-power anthem for frightening times, noncoercive yet still inspiring.
It’s the product of Solange working through the trauma, sadness, and disappointment of being a black woman in this society.
There’s so much space around Solange’s calm, and the song’s jazzy, soulful rhythms are carefully selected to evoke a whole history of black musicians, black culture, and black spirituality.
At a time when power is something loud and dangerous and brash, “Cranes in the Sky” is an atypical song of revolution.
It’s a New Yorker’s goodbye to New York, an overdue star’s coming-out party, and a warning to herself.
Celebrated French-Canadian producers Lunice and Jacques Greene make cameos in the unforgettable black-and-white video, but only cameos: “212” felt like pure Banks, the unfiltered arrival of a fiery new voice.
“If I listen closely. I can hear the sky falling, too.” What an unprecedented act of bravery in the history of black music, of queer music, of all music; he opened the door so that we could at once pour ourselves into his light.
It was the lens through which we listened to Channel Orange, and no song echoes the love, the glow, the tectonic impact of Frank Ocean more than “Thinkin Bout You.”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can Video Games Replace the Outdoors?”

As long as there have been video games, critics have bemoaned their social and psychological consequences.
Over the years, researchers have churned out studies showing that violent games can lead younger players to be more hostile and less empathetic.
As Rockstar Games cofounder Dan Houser told New York magazine last year, the result is an experience “In which the world unfolds around you, dependent on what you do.” Red Dead Redemption 2 was released on October 26, 2018, and brought in $725 million during its first weekend, beating the strongest film opening of 2018, Avengers: Infinity War, by almost $100 million.
Gaming had completely replaced the outdoors.
“Video games can act as a form of environmental enrichment in humans,” they said in a paper that appeared in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience.
Gregory D. Clemenson, one of the authors, cautions that this does not mean video games are as nourishing to the mind as a walk in the park, but they may do more good than people think.
Michael “Qwerkus” Gerchufsky, a 50-year-old medical editor from Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, describes the appeal as we hike around the towering National Memorial Arch: “I was like, wait, there’s a video game that gets me outdoors?”.
“Augmented reality is bleeding out from games into physical fitness,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Blind Spots in AI Just Might Help Protect Your Privacy”

Just a few small tweaks to an image or a few additions of decoy data to a database can fool a system into coming to entirely wrong conclusions.
Gong points to Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica incident as exactly the sort of privacy invasion he hopes to prevent: The data science firm paid thousands of Facebook users a few dollars each for answers to political and personal questions and then linked those answers with their public Facebook data to create a set of “Training data.” When the firm then trained a machine-learning engine with that dataset, the resulting model could purportedly predict private political persuasions based only on public Facebook data.
After tweaking the data a few different ways, they found that by adding just three fake app ratings, chosen to statistically point to an incorrect city-or taking revealing ratings away-that small amount of noise could reduce the accuracy of their engine’s prediction back to no better than a random guess.
The cat-and-mouse game of predicting and protecting private user data, Gong admits, doesn’t end there.
If the machine-learning “Attacker” is aware that adversarial examples may be protecting a data set from analysis, he or she can use what’s known as “Adversarial training”-generating their own adversarial examples to include in a training data set so that the resulting machine-learning engine is far harder to fool.
Another research group has experimented with a form of adversarial example data protection that’s intended to cut short that cat-and-mouse game.
Researchers at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Texas at Arlington looked at how adversarial examples could prevent a potential privacy leak in tools like VPNs and the anonymity software Tor, designed to hide the source and destination of online traffic.
Attackers who can gain access to encrypted web browsing data in transit can in some cases use machine learning to spot patterns in the scrambled traffic that allows a snoop to predict which website-or even which specific page-a person is visiting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Boycotts, buying sprees, and the rise of conscious consumerism”

Sustainability-tinged consumer activism is a new flavor of an old tactic, one that falls under the umbrella of what we now call conscious consumerism.
Consumer activism can take the shape of two diametrically opposed actions – buying en masse and boycotting en masse – that are after the same goal ” either grassroots collective organization of consumption or its withdrawal,” explains Lawrence Glickman, an American historian at Cornell University and author of Buying Power: A History of Consumer Activism.
Consumer activism, boycotts included, puts power in the hands of the people – “Or at least they think it is,” adds Glickman.
Conscious consumerism is today’s catchall to cover consumer dollars invested in a host of progressive values: worker rights, animal rights, low-carbon footprint, recycled and/or renewable materials, organic, local, etc.
“Small steps taken by thoughtful consumers – to recycle, to eat locally, to buy a blouse made of organic cotton instead of polyester – will not change the world.” Instead, she argues, conscious consumerism is an expensive distraction from the real work at hand.
With more opportunities to be a conscious consumer – thanks to more and more “Leading brands that compete to see who is greener,” as Joel Makower, author of 1990’s The Green Consumer, writes for GreenBiz – so too do opportunities for economic existential angst mount.
Okay, okay, but does consumer activism do anything? In a word: sometimes! In more words, whether or not consumer activism and conscious consumerism “Work” depends, really, on the definition of success.
Yes, phosphate-free dish detergent can curb water pollution, she says; but Kennedy’s research shows that conscious consumers often maintain very large carbon footprints themselves.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lauren Gunderson profile: America’s most popular playwright is ready for Broadway. But is New York ready for her?”

“I think in New York they think, Danger danger, this is getting into cheesy love story mode.” – Lauren Gunderson.
In 2009, Lauren Gunderson left New York for the West Coast, and since then, she’s made a career in America’s regional and repertory theaters, writing brisk comedies about plucky women, classical literature, romance, and the history of science.
At one point in her career, Gunderson was on the path to being a New York playwright.
The inspiration for the show was a long drive Gunderson and Melcon took together in which they posed the question, “What sort of show did the American theater most need so that people could add it to the season planning processes?” Gunderson told the New Yorker that by the end of the trip, they had the show outlined on Starbucks napkins.
The lesson of Gunderson’s career is that New York doesn’t have to matter, but the way Gunderson talks about her New York experience-and her upcoming premiere-makes it clear that New York still matters to her.
David Cote, who was for many years the head critic at Time Out New York, noted that “New York’s theaters at this moment are interested in dealing with identity politics and messy intersectional issues.” Maybe Gunderson, he speculated, “Is simply not an edgy enough feminist?” Minadakis, the Marin Theatre AD, hears New York theater people dismiss Gunderson’s plays as “Not serious” because of their inveterate optimism.
To McNulty, the issue keeping Gunderson out of New York is not taste but sexism.
“I could be a total snob,” he said, “And say New Yorkers are far too intelligent to have this middlebrow stuff flatter them. But tons of middlebrow stuff gets produced in New York.” Cote compared Gunderson with a writer whose once-edgy work now seems much less provocative: “She’s a much better playwright than Neil LaBute, and for a while everything he wrote was being produced.”

The orginal article.