Summary of “How Dare You Represent Your People That Way: The Oral History of ‘Better Luck Tomorrow'”

Nearly two decades ago, Justin Lin had a bold idea: What if he made a movie about Asian-Americans?
“I didn’t want to make an Asian-American film. I wanted to make a movie about Asian-American characters.”
“I grew up wanting to be Robert De Niro, not some good Asian boy next door.”
“Asian-Americans, in the hierarchy of race, never quite made it to the top. We always get pushed over for some reason.”
“In some ways, it’s harder to make a film that matters than it is to make a good film. Better Luck Tomorrow mattered.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The great African regreening: millions of ‘magical’ new trees bring renewal”

The sand under its stately trees looked completely barren, but Souley Cheibou, a farmer in his 60s, was not worried.
They were gao trees – known as winterthorns in English – with unique, seemingly magical powers.
Over the past three decades, the landscape of southern Niger has been transformed by more than 200m new trees, many of them gaos.
Small-scale farmers have achieved it because of what the trees can do for crop yields and other aspects of farming life.
With less space to expand into as more people are born, hard-up farmers are increasingly realising that the trees can regenerate degraded land.
The ambitious Great Green Wall project to surround the Sahara desert with trees and other plants has changed beyond recognition after debate over whether desertification – the process by which soil loses its fertitlity – is real.
In areas with the best cover, they organised patrols to protect their trees from passing farmers and neighbouring villagers seeking firewood.
Their loyalty to their gaos could make areas around Zinder the most vulnerable to a disease that Reij and Tougiani have recently spotted killing trees near Niamey, the capital.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chen Chen Aziza Barnes Layli Long Soldier Poetry”

One poem of Barnes’s that I keep returning to starts with a minor domestic scene: The speaker finds a centipede near her writing desk.
The opening poem of the book, it’s a wandering lament for a basic human failing.
Many of the poems in i be, but i ain’t beg to be experienced viva voce, and it’s easy to imagine them bellowed in front of the footlights, or slung coolly back and forth in front of the camera.
While performance seems to suit the strengths of Barnes’s work, Layli Long Soldier’s poetry is harder to separate from the page-which doesn’t mean that it rests there comfortably.
The vow to compose sentences with care comes from “38,” a five-page poem that acts as a fulcrum between the shorter poems in the book’s first section and the longer “Whereas Statements” of the book’s second and final section.
The poem builds force with stark, declarative sentences, each standing as a stanza or paragraph on its own.
“Real” poems do not “Really” require words.
Then she reconsiders: After all, the trader’s words initiate the poem, “Click the gears of the poem into place.” It’s telling that even in the most straightforward portion of the book, Long Soldier deploys language to mark its own limits, to probe its utility, to take its measure against concrete and tangible actions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Teens get a bad rap’: the neuroscientist championing moody adolescents”

Sarah-Jayne Blakemore looks barely older than a teenager herself.
“Until about 15 or 20 years ago,” she says, “We just didn’t know that the brain develops at all within the teenage years.” Until then, it was assumed that teenage behaviour was almost entirely down to hormonal changes in puberty, but brain scans and psychological experiments have now found that adolescence is a critical period of neurological change, much of which is responsible for the unique characteristics of adolescent behaviour.
“Teenagers get a really bad rap and we mock them and demonise them more than we do any other section of society. And it’s not right. They’re going through an important stage of their development that they need to go through. Most parents don’t know that their teenagers are undergoing such a transformation.”
Blakemore likes to talk about her work by beginning with a quote from a teenager’s diary dated 20 July 1969: “I went to arts centre in yellow cords and blouse. Ian there but didn’t speak to me. Got rhyme put in my handbag from someone who’s apparently got a crush on me. It’s Nicholas I think. UGH. Man Landed on moon.”
Parents fret about their teenagers’ obsession with social media and selfies, but Blakemore says it is only the logical consequence of technology making their imaginary audience real.
“There’s a lot of evidence that teenagers value other teenagers’ views more than adults’ views. There have been studies on bullying – and smoking – showing that if you get the young people themselves to run campaigns, they have a much bigger affect on attitudes than if the same campaigns are carried out by teachers.”
Like most adults thrust on to a stage, teenagers who believe in their imaginary audience want nothing more than to blend into the wings – and Blakemore’s work has helped her make sense of her own blushing teenage self.
“That’s not what teenagers do. And it’s really important that they don’t, because they have to become independent from us – so there has to be a lot of rebellion, and embarrassment in front of us, and it’s all part of what’s important for teenagers to do. But that’s really hard for parents to take. And I think that’s reflected in society this sneering we do about teenagers.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The last Blockbuster: ‘I’m proud that we’ve survived'”

Standing unpretentiously in the car park of a petrol station at a busy intersection in Oregon, this Blockbuster is the last one still open in the US. Over 10 years ago, the Blockbuster chain, known for short-term rentals of films on video cassette and DVD, numbered 9,000 stores around the world.
The store in Bend, Oregon, is a franchise and became the last one after two independent locations in Alaska shut down in July.
The best stories are about the parents who bring their kids and are like: “This is what we used to do, we used to grab a movie and take it around.” Or the ones talking about how they had their first dates going to Blockbuster.
We have a beautiful grass in front of our store and three weeks ago there wasn’t a path to the Blockbuster sign like there’s now – yellow, worn out grass from everybody taking their pictures.
It doesn’t matter what colour of skin, religion or political affiliation, everybody in the world has a happy feeling when they think about Blockbuster and it brings us all together.
A woman who had managed a Blockbuster store in California came with her family and it was like we were long-lost friends.
All the media hype has actually reminded people that we’re here and we’ve had more customers coming in saying “Hey, we want to support you, we want to keep our last Blockbuster in Bend.” That’s been really wonderful.
The elements of a traditional Blockbuster have all been kept: yellow walls, candy machines, even the computer system with its blue screen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In the Year of ‘Black Panther,’ the Oscars Are in Panic Mode. Should They Be?”

Last year’s matchup between The Shape of Water and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri-two movies vanishing from the popular imagination faster than Harvey Weinstein-overwhelmed the significantly more popular and memorable achievements of Get Out and Dunkirk.
The reaction to the news among the Oscar monitors was swift: What fresh hell is this? The vagueness and intellectual bankruptcy of the Academy’s idea has been upbraided by virtually every pundit and movie observer around, from Mark Harris to, well, Rob Lowe.
Movies, in their essence, are a popular medium, designed to draw crowds at great volume.
Now, nothing’s a lock in the Oscars, and certainly not a superhero movie with a third act that culminates in a goofy CGI punching match.
Still, the marketing and campaign dollars that Disney will supply combined with the social representational forces that will form around the movie as awards season approaches make it a highly likely entrant.
We could examine what the “Popular” category might look like-and I will below, sort of-but what’s most interesting about this turn of events is that Black Panther was literally the only film we’ve seen this year that seems remotely certain to be recognized in the major categories at the ceremony in February.
Ask someone on the street whether they like Solo more than any of those movies.
A race among three Marvel movies, a Fox movie, and a Pixar movie isn’t a race.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”Everybody Immediately Knew That It Was for Amazon”: Has Bezos Become More Powerful in D.C. Than Trump?”

Though there has long been talk about the Defense Department joining the cloud, the current call for bids was put together only after Defense Secretary James Mattis hired a D.C. lobbyist who had previously consulted for Amazon.
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos personally tweeted a photo of himself hosting #SecDef Mattis.
“Everybody immediately knew that it was for Amazon,” says a rival bidder who asked not to be named.
In places, JEDI echoes Amazon’s own language: It calls for a “Ruggedized” storage system, the same word Amazon uses to tout its Snowball Edge product.
Leading Amazon rivals like Google, Microsoft, and IBM are up in arms about the way JEDI was crafted to benefit Amazon.
Amazon has spent $67 million on lobbying since 2000-including more this year than Citigroup, JP Morgan Chase, and Wells Fargo combined.
If you think the JEDI contract is big, consider this: Last year, working for Bezos, Rung helped pass the so-called Amazon amendment, a provision buried in a defense authorization bill that will establish Amazon as the go-to portal for every online purchase the government makes-some $53 billion every year.
President Trump may enjoy firing off incendiary tweets attacking Amazon.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Fighting the vanilla thieves of Madagascar”

Thousands of miles away in London, Oddono’s ice cream shop is tucked between a pizza parlour and a cafe on a busy street in South Kensington.
The owners boast of the finest natural ingredients in their authentic Italian gelato: Valrhona chocolate from France, pistachios from Sicily, hazelnuts from Piedmont.
One variety of ice cream was missing.
“When I told customers that we didn’t have any vanilla ice cream, many of them were shocked,” says Christian Oddono, who manages the shop.
“I had to explain that we didn’t want to give them bad quality products but also we were never going to use chemicals. Then, they understood.”
The price for last year’s Madagascan vanilla crop was sky high, but Christian found the quality of what he was getting so low that he took vanilla ice cream off his menu.
“This year I found another, better supplier in Madagascar. The prices are still high, so we’ve had to raise our prices as well, but our customers haven’t complained.”
“We see a general trend of more customers wanting to eat more authentic food and shying away from chemicals and lab-produced substitutes.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Reality Ecosystem: What AR/VR/XR needs to go big – TechCrunch”

Mobile AR has shown what is possible, with Pokémon GO, Snapchat and soon Google Maps/Lens again standouts.
Critical use cases for mobile AR are beginning to emerge, with perhaps the first being Google’s Maps/Lens combination revealed at Google I/O 2018.
It solves a universal problem when you come out of Embarcadero Station and are told to go south – but where’s south? Google combined computer vision with mobile AR to show you exactly where to go, and even gave you a cute fox to lead you there.
Houzz proved mobile AR apps can drive an extraordinary 11x sales uplift.
Current mobile leaders could determine how mobile AR evolves even more than startup insurgents.
It’s too early to tell with smart glasses again, but their critical use cases might need to be more than ports from breakout mobile AR successes.
It could become a key enabler for the Reality Ecosystem for both mobile AR and smart glasses.
Talking with 30 leading VCs in Sand Hill Road and China showed a mental model geared toward mobile AR and computer vision in the near-term, and smart glasses in the long-term.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Great Chinese Art Heist”

Strange how it keeps happening, how the greatest works of Chinese art keep getting brazenly stolen from museums around the world.
Is it a conspiracy? Vengeance for treasures plundered years ago? We sent Alex W. Palmer to investigate the trail of theft and the stunning rumor: Is the Chinese government behind one of the boldest art-crime waves in history?

The orginal article.