Summary of “How to Be More Productive Without Putting in Extra Hours”

Make sure you work on those before you move on to less critical tasks and you’ll find you feel a whole lot more productive at the end of the day.
The whole idea of working smarter rather than harder stems from the fact that many of us put in more and more hours only to find we don’t get more done.
If you evaluate yourself by what you actually get done rather than the time it takes to get something done, you’ll start to notice a difference in how you work.
If you start keeping a list of everything you get done in a day, you might be surprised how much more motivated you are to do work that matters and stay focused so you get even more done.
Although you might be tempted to let go of your routine entirely on your days off, our CEO has found that maintaining a weekend routine that doesn’t differ too much from his weekdays works well: The more he let go of his routine on the weekends, the longer it took him to pick it up again during the week.
Some of us struggle to stop working, rather than start working.
You could make this work with an evening cut-off time to get you out of work by, say, 5 p.m. Ogle gets up early, so he has five to six hours of work time before his midday cut-off point.
Light exercise works well for me, so I like to walk home from the office or take a walk after work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These Skulls Look Purple and Orange. They Are Both Red.”

If a sign tells you To follow the purple skull to your destination, the answer seems simple: Veer left.
Isolate the stripes that make up the skulls, and you’ll find neither skull has purple bones; in fact, all the bones are the same color.
Slot them back into the banded setting, and they shift to purple and orange.
The pigments morph because of the ­Munker-​White illusion, which shifts the perception of two identical color tones when they’re placed against different surrounding hues.
The phenomenon causes an image to skew toward the color of the objects that surround it.
Here, one skull is covered by blue stripes in the foreground and the other with yellow ones.
When the original skulls take on the characteristics of the separate surroundings, they look like different colors entirely.
Don’t be fooled: Follow both skulls by going straight.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Insane 6-Day, 500-Mile Race That Riveted America”

The men on the track were Edward Payson Weston and Dan O’Leary, and what played out before a screaming fan base was more than just a race.
The two competitors drew lots to determine track position: Weston would walk on the inside track, O’Leary on the outside.
According to one observer, O’Leary walked with a “Straight form, quick stride, and bent arms.” He held his head up and looked straight ahead. Meanwhile, Weston seemed “Rather to drag than throw his feet.” Worse still, the observer bemoaned how he seemed “To carry his head on his breast and to see nothing but the dirt before him.” O’Leary’s crisp form translated into results, and he shot into the lead, completing his first mile in 11 minutes and 3 seconds.
Weston was convinced that fatigue would overcome O’Leary before the race ended.
Finally, as Saturday morning dawned, the outcome no longer felt like a question: O’Leary was ahead, 425 miles to Weston’s 395.
O’Leary paused, caught his breath-and then continued walking.
Men like O’Leary and Weston became celebrated heroes, seeing their images immortalized on some of the first cigarette trading cards, a precursor to baseball cards.
Great walkers like Weston and O’Leary didn’t stop walking, even as pedestrianism faded in popularity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Man Who Got America High”

First, there is an archived People magazine article from 1978, titled: ‘TOURING ROCK STARS GO TO AL DELLENTASH WHEN THEY REALLY WANT TO GET HIGH.’ The headline is a clever joke, you see, because the story is about his multi-million-dollar private jet-leasing business, which he built in his twenties: “Among the acts that have chartered Dellentash’s three Convairs, two helicopters and a Boeing 707 are the Rolling Stones, KISS and the Grateful Dead.”.
Ironically, Dellentash was secretly getting the whole of America high – hiding in plain sight as a chartered plane provider, and later, a music manager for 1980s acts including Meat Loaf and the Bay City Rollers.
Online speculators have tried to link Dellentash’s name to the famous D.B. Cooper hijacking in 1971, the C.I.A.’s covert operations in South America, and even the 9/11 terror attacks in New York – tinfoil-hat theorists discovered that Dellentash’s father was once a contractor on the World Trade Center.
“My life was all mapped out for me.” In 1971, Dellentash married his high school girlfriend, and they had two children.
“The propeller disaster in Belize was fresh in my mind,” Dellentash says, “But everything with this guy just seemed organized. He made it all sound easy. He offered $150,000 in start-up money, so he was really talking my language.” But as Dellentash would discover, this gentleman’s name was not Steve Teri, and he was no realtor.
Sly Stallone is holding court five tables down, but the waitresses fuss over Dellentash, mainly because he tips roughly 200%. Over eggs, Dellentash says he would rather talk about his rock music achievements.
Dellentash spread himself too thin, and while Bonnie had just a small part in the movie, she had taken over the second lead role in Dellentash’s life.
“The cops tested a sample of the heroin he was holding in their lab, and they had never seen anything quite like it. I mean, it was off-the-scale pure. They knew just by the purity of the heroin that Dellentash was involved incredibly high up the chain – or he was Mafia.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Journey Into the Animal Mind”

There now appears to exist, alongside the human world, a whole universe of vivid animal experience.
Apart from Pythagoras and a few others, ancient Western philosophers did not hand down a rich tradition of thinking about animal consciousness.
Eastern thinkers have long been haunted by its implications-especially the Jains, who have taken animal consciousness seriously as a moral matter for nearly 3,000 years.
So it’s difficult to make a knockdown argument that a particular animal is conscious based strictly on its neuroanatomy.
The first animals to direct themselves through three-dimensional space would have encountered a new set of problems whose solution may have been the evolution of consciousness.
It needed to correct any errors introduced by its own movements, a difficult trick given that some of its sensors are mounted on body parts that are themselves mobile, not least its swiveling head. The neuroscientist Björn Merker has suggested that early animal brains solved these problems by generating an internal model of the world, with an avatar of the body at its center.
A Jain temple near the top of Girnar, the mountain where an ancient “Fordmaker” is said to have achieved total consciousness, with access to all animal minds.
Maybe people will come here from all corners of the Earth to pay their respects to Neminath, who is, after all, only a stand-in for whoever it was who first heard animal screams and understood their meaning.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Brutal Murder, a Wearable Witness, and an Unlikely Suspect”

A 10-minute drive from the deli, Adele and Dominic Navarra lived with their two children, Stephen and Karen, in a ranch house in a subdivision called Warner Heights.
Lavoie said Karen’s brother, Stephen, was the outgoing one-much like their “Jovial, larger than life” dad-while Karen took after Adele.
Karen studied science at nearby San Jose State University for three years, moved into her own apartment, and became a pharmacy tech at a regional hospital.
“If Karen had even thought about having a future with a family, after that, I think she really wanted to take care of her mom and dad.” Dominic died in 1996.
About a decade later, Karen inherited her grandmother’s home on Terra Noble Way.
A few years later, in 2010, Adele married Tony in a City Hall ceremony, and Adele moved into Tony’s place, a cream-colored house with a garden of basil and tomato plants.
The Aiellos were living in Silicon Valley, but Adele said she only knew a little about computers and Tony said he knew “Zero.” A four-bedroom ranch house that was once a first step into the middle class sells for more than $1 million.
According to Adele, Karen used to say she was “The loner of the family,” her life revolving around work and home, where she cared for her cats and grew roses in her yard.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Double Triple”

By the time Daru and Sarah were under consideration, UChicago Medicine had performed four of the 15 triple transplants of this kind ever undertaken.
A young man who was a potential match for Daru had been declared brain-dead. The man’s heart, liver, and kidneys were intact and strong, and his family had agreed to donate the organs.
He’d be performing Daru’s heart transplant, the initial procedure upon which the rest of the undertaking rested.
Two floors below, in Daru’s ICU room, his family took turns saying a few words while Daru, already connected to IVs for the procedure, signed three sets of consent papers, one for each organ transplant.
While the family watched Daru being wheeled away, the three SUVs carrying the two surgical teams – one for the heart and one for the liver and kidney – sped across the city to retrieve the donor organs.
To time the procedure as precisely as possible, Jeevanandam did not open Daru’s chest until the UChicago Medicine surgeon who had traveled to the other hospital began removing the donor’s heart.
At 8:18 a.m. on December 20, his triple transplant completed after more than 17 hours in surgery, Daru was moved back to the ICU. Less than 10 hours later, and in the same operating room, Sarah’s triple transplant began.
As Jeevanandam had anticipated, the heart portion of her surgery required extra care, taking nearly twice as long as Daru’s.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Michael Vick’s dogfighting case changed animal welfare”

These dogs are reminders that even now, 12 years later, survivors of former NFL quarterback Michael Vick’s dogfighting operation live on in pockets throughout the country, including here at Best Friends Animal Society’s 3,700-acre sanctuary.
For 47 dogs pulled from Bad Newz Kennels, there was another, less publicized development that helped change how dogs taken in large-scale dogfighting busts are treated.
Because Vick’s fame turned the dogfighting bust into a national story, not just a conversation in the animal welfare community, many watched with curiosity or skepticism, wondering whether a dog from a traumatic past could ever live normally in society.
Best Friends said a dog escaped its run and broke into the run of Vick dog Tug, who broke into Denzel’s run.
When her dog died, she reached out to BADRAP. Only then did she learn the dog she had fallen in love with came from the Vick case.
Until her recent death, Mya lived with Curly, another Vick dog, in the same run where the dogs from this case were first housed.
Leaders from across animal welfare met to confront the issue, and it prompted the Humane Society to adjust its stance on dogs seized from fight busts.
Uba, a Vick dog who lives with Letti de Little in northern Virginia, has a housemate named Jamie, a dog from a 2013 multistate fight bust in which 367 dogs were seized.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dark crystals: the brutal reality behind a booming wellness craze”

Crystals were stacked upon crystals, filling plastic trays, carved into every possible shape: knives, penises, bathtubs, angels, birds of paradise.
While a few large mining companies operate in Madagascar, more than 80% of crystals are mined “Artisanally” – meaning by small groups and families, without regulation, who are paid rock-bottom prices.
For the crystals mined in Anjoma Ramartina, the path out of the country is through a company called Madagascar Specimens, which exports about 65 tonnes of carved crystals a year.
“Crystals are the most popular stones now – many customers are looking for it, because – I’m not sure of the English – the medicine with crystals is very popular now. Like therapy, the belief crystals have healing power, you know? It’s very – how do you say? – trendy.”
Even with a booming market, she said, the company didn’t yet have a budget to track their crystals to their source at the mines.
The challenge of sourcing crystals ethically is one faced by the industry as a whole: Glacce, Goop or any given Etsy vendor are no more culpable than the next crystal dealer.
At Tuscon, in the marquee for crystal vendor The Village Silversmith, I asked owner John Bajoras – tall, tanned and broad-shouldered, with an enormous shark tooth around his neck – where the responsibility lay if crystals were coming from mines where people, many of them children, were risking their lives for meagre pay.
The $4.2tn wellness industry rolls on, bolstered by profits from cheap crystals and a generation looking for alternative modes of healing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the Facility Where Kodak Brings Film Back to Life”

The elevators in Building 30, where Kodak blends film chemicals, help workers’ eyes get used to the conditions that light-sensitive compounds demand.
Learning to work with the fussy animal-derived material is what spurred Kodak founder George Eastman to create the film giant’s research arm in the late 1800s.
The 52-inch-wide film rolls pass through a coating waterfall, a cooler, and a dryer.
Kodak paints the airtight containers flat black on the inside, and seals them with collars to ensure no light can seep in and prematurely expose the film.
This device, which Kodak calls “The heart,” punches holes in the edges of the film so sprockets inside a camera can crank through exposures.
During production, Kodak uses night-vision cameras to monitor the film for irregularities such as uneven application or breaks.
The final film goes on to the packaging area, where a machine wraps it around plastic spools like these.
The machine at left funnels empty metal film cans via conveyor belt toward the last packaging step-inserting rolls into their canisters.

The orginal article.