Summary of “The Odds And Perils Of Gambling Successfully On Japan’s New Casinos”

While Yakuza were traditionally notorious for their violent methods, one figure stood out for favoring a more cerebral approach to profiteering: Susumu Ishii – the second-generation leader of the Inagawa-kai, Japan’s third-largest yakuza group.
When the laws changed and Ishii was jailed in the late 197os for organizing gambling, he revised his views on what the yakuza should be and heralded the rise of the modern-day Yakuza, who have at times turned the Japanese stock market into their own private casino.
Casinos could open a whole new revenue stream for the yakuza.
What casino companies coming into Japan should really fear, according to Jake Adelstein, an investigative journalist who has covered organized crime in the country for more than 20 years, is not losing money to cheating yakuza customers, but the infiltration of their companies and casino staff by organized crime members.
It might be possible to set up excellent surveillance at casinos to keep yakuza from walking in the front door.
So what else can be done to mitigate the “Yakuza risk” associated with doing business in Japan, especially as it concerns legalized gaming? First and foremost, accurate and timely due diligence must be completed prior to hiring staff and engaging in any business relationship, as the monetary incentive to penetrate or compromise legalized gaming establishments is just too great.
Third, educating all vetted casino staff on recognizing yakuza and the signs of their entrapment schemes, as well as cultivating awareness among staff of how they could become targeted as a gateway into the casino operation, is indispensable.
Cyber security may merit special attention; vulnerabilities have been discovered at casinos in other locations around Asia, so casino operators will need state-of-the-art cyber security as well.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Amazon Is Testing Its Own Delivery Service to Rival FedEx and UPS”

Amazon.com Inc. is experimenting with a new delivery service intended to make more products available for free two-day delivery and relieve overcrowding in its warehouses, according to two people familiar with the plan, which will push the online retailer deeper into functions handled by longtime partners United Parcel Service Inc. and FedEx Corp. The service began two years ago in India, and Amazon has been slowly marketing it to U.S. merchants in preparation for a national expansion, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the U.S. pilot project is confidential.
Amazon will oversee pickup of packages from warehouses of third-party merchants selling goods on Amazon.com and their delivery to customers’ homes, the people said – work that is now often handled by UPS and FedEx.
Handling more deliveries itself would give Amazon greater flexibility and control over the last mile to shoppers’ doorsteps, let it save money through volume discounts, and help avoid congestion in its own warehouses by keeping merchandise in the outside sellers’ own facilities.
The merchants had to demonstrate they could meet Amazon’s delivery pledge, and many used UPS and FedEx for deliveries.
Seller Flex would also give Seattle-based Amazon more visibility into the warehousing and delivery operations of its merchant partners, potentially helping it make full use of their product inventory, storage space and proximity to customers while still guaranteeing quick delivery.
The project underscores Amazon’s ambitions to expand its logistics operations and wean itself off the delivery networks of UPS and FedEx.
Taking over some responsibility for delivery enables Amazon to protect that edge as rivals like Wal-Mart Stores Inc. enhance their own delivery operations.
“But if you look at the world of e-commerce and double-digit growth year after year, FedEx and UPS are still going to get their share of growth. If Amazon does take a few customers, the whole ecommerce pie is growing so fast that FedEx and UPS won’t miss a beat.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Sophia Amoruso Learned From Nasty Gal’s Bankruptcy”

In 2006, Sophia Amoruso started Nasty Gal and was met with huge success.
Amoruso had an estimated net worth of $280 million, enough to earn her a spot on Forbes’ list of the Richest Self-Made Women, where she was one of the youngest members.
“It was the day Trump was elected,” recalls Amoruso, now 32, speaking at the Forbes 30 Under 30 Summit in Boston Tuesday.
Amoruso hosts conferences she calls Girlboss Rallys and there was even a Netflix series based on her life.
“We are exploring the concept of what success means,” says Amoruso.
The pains of the last year still fresh, Amoruso is already thinking hard about what future success will look like for herself and others.
“You don’t get what you don’t ask for.” Amoruso recommends tools like Boomerang, a G-mail app the resurfaces e-mails when recipients haven’t responded.
“Asking and asking again and asking again goes really far.” “Being naive is a really really beautiful thing. You can accomplish so much.” “Focus on less things and be great at those things.” Focus can be hard, especially when you are a creative person with lots of ideas.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Netflix, Amazon Could Really Disrupt Legacy Networks: Buy Sports Rights”

“If you want to destabilize the entire entertainment ecosystem and you were Google, Facebook or Amazon, the best way to do it is to suck sports out of the legacy ecosystem,” Rich Greenfield, a managing director at BTIG, told moderator Mike Slade of Second Avenue Partners on Tuesday at TheWrap’s annual media conference, TheGrill.
The panelists said that with the proliferation of dozens of streaming services – and established content owners increasingly making their shows and movies available on demand – cable and broadcast companies can’t count on a regular audience, to their detriment.
“Whether it’s ‘Monday Night Football’ or catching up on ‘Game of Thrones,’ the choice is yours. It really screws up the legacy ecosystem of you watching the show at 8 o’clock, sitting through ads, and doing the same next week.”
Greenfield said the reason companies like Apple and Amazon haven’t tried to buy old-school content owners like Disney is that they’d inherit a dependence on the pay-TV model.
“The cable companies are just too greedy.”
Gerber said if cable companies lowered their price a little bit, consumers would stick with them out of the ease of having one login versus a variety of individual apps.
After praising Netflix’s international rights strategy, the panelists discussed how increasingly ambitious TV shows and a continued proliferation of streaming services have strained the movie business.
With Netflix and Amazon – and now Apple and Facebook – dedicating real resources to original video content, there is even more pressure on legacy content owners to keep their top talent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cinema Chains Take It On The Chin”

Lachlan Murdoch, Executive Chairman of Twenty-First Century Fox, said at a presentation at the Goldman Sachs Communacopia conference earlier this month that the top four animated films grossed 50% less than in 2016, and that this accounted for 90% of the drop in the summer box office.
The immediate cyclical issue is that 50% drop; the secular one is that cinemas’ fortunes are so concentrated in so few films.
Sector bankers and analysts expect some snap-back in cinema chains’ stock prices as the box office picks up again.
With AMC, one person points out that there is elevated short interest-bets on a decline in the stock price – and that, as the company gets its leverage under control and fears about Dalian Wanda ebb, recovery can be expected there, too.
The limited number of studios producing very few major hits casts a long shadow, another secular force weighing down on the industry.
Cinemas currently enjoy a window of exclusivity for exhibiting films; VOD would see studios cut into that window, offering customers a chance to stream new films for a premium price before they’re available on TV networks or ordinary streaming services like Netflix.
Studios and cinema chains have been in extended negotiations over whether the exclusivity window will be shortened.
Murdoch, in his presentation, pointed out that a lot of piracy of film content happens in the 45-day black-out period after the box office run of a film ends, and said that this doesn’t make sense.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The End Of E-Commerce? These Days, It’s All Just Commerce”

Given the continued rapid growth of online shopping, it might seem crazy to suggest that the era of e-commerce is coming to an end.
Rather than buying into the retail apocalypse narrative and seeing brick-and-mortar stores as liabilities, most were clearly in the camp of believing that stores were assets.
Physical retail might be different, but it clearly is not dead. Notably, Mark Lore from Walmart/Jet spoke of the need for retailers to be channel agnostic and highlighted how Walmart’s stores give the brand a distinct advantage.
TechStyle CEO Adam Goldenberg showcased statistics on how Fabletic’s overall brand performance has been enhanced through the opening of stores and on how the merging of cross-channel data gives them an edge.
While using somewhat different language, numerous other speakers acknowledged that customers shop everywhere and the best retailers need to meet them where they are.
The increasing investments in physical stores byAmazon and other digitally native brands serve to underscore this growing reality.
We also know that opening stores drives increases in e-commerce in that store’s trade area, just as closing a store often leads to dramatic declines in online shopping.
Ultimately it’s essential to realize that it is rarely an online-vs.-offline battle, but a struggle that is won when we accept that it’s all just commerce and strive to bring the best of offline and online together on behalf of the customer.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sergio Ermotti Q&A: How UBS Became Home to Half the World’s Billionaires”

BLOOMBERG MARKETS Almost half the world’s billionaires bank with you.
SERGIO ERMOTTI It’s always fascinating to hear how they became so successful.
BM Is there a limit to how big UBS can grow from an assets perspective?
BM How does that affect how you manage this business?
If you look at risk management and how you run a bank nowadays, you always think about stress.
Long-term is, How do we get the organization to move toward the next 10 years? And how do we embrace those challenges and changes in a positive way? And fortunately or unfortunately, I’m paid to think not just about the positive.
If you look at how we measure people today, it’s not just if you’re the best client adviser, or banker, or trader.
You need to constantly think about how you keep yourself relevant in front of clients, how you create value for shareholders, how you attract and retain the best people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Limits of “Diversity””

Diversity is often a comparative term: a college might strive to be as diverse as its community, or as its state, or as the country as a whole; often, in debates over diversity, the unspoken expectation is that the racial makeup of an institution should reflect the racial demographics of the nation.
In “The Enigma of Diversity,” the sociologist Ellen Berrey studies the divergent uses of “Diversity,” which serves for some executives as an “Aspirational ideal,” and not necessarily a transformative program.
Liberals have been particularly enthusiastic exponents of Powell’s diversity doctrine, but the ideal of diversity is generally nonpartisan.
Because diversity meant “The appreciation of difference,” he argued, it was the ideology of “Bosses and owners,” who could celebrate their own increasing “Cultural diversity” while ignoring the economic inequality with which they were complicit.
So-called diversity managers worked to foster an “Inclusive” environment, but they seemed to spend much of their time “Reiterating the good that would come from diversity,” as a way of justifying their own positions.
The prevailing wisdom seemed to be that “Racial minorities” were “Culturally distinct from but culturally equivalent to white people.” At one point, Michigan’s admissions-office Web site pictured a welter of enthusiastic believers, including a student who declared, “Diversity is one of the issues I’m most passionate about.” In a book called “The Diversity Bargain,” another scholar, Natasha K. Warikoo, concludes that students at Harvard have fully internalized the logic of diversity as an engine of mutual profit.
“To many white students, minority students do not hold up their end of the diversity bargain when they join the Black Students Association or sit together in the cafeteria.”
Why should we care about these numbers? Goldberg mentions what is essentially a diversity argument: in the nineteen-thirties, when the F.D.N.Y. was essentially all white, “The lack of Black uniformed service workers increased racial tensions in the city.” During the protests and riots of the late sixties, white firefighters were sometimes attacked in black neighborhoods; Goldberg notes that “Black firefighters suddenly became highly sought after for highly visible roles.” Yet Goldberg’s more persuasive argument is not that black firefighters help the F.D.N.Y. but, rather, that the F.D.N.Y. helps black firefighters.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Steakhouses like Peter Luger Are Obsessed With Beef From This 97-Year-Old Family Business”

“We don’t want gigantic customers. The big chain stores? We don’t have enough beef. If they run a sale, it would be too large of a percentage of our product. I don’t want that,” Davis says.
Cohen’s youngest daughter, Florence, married Davis’ father, Pennie, who joined his father-in-law’s business in 1945 and soon became president.
Davis was born in 1951 and witnessed the glory years of Omaha’s beef industry.
Davis joined the business full-time in 1973 after graduating from the University of Denver with a degree in business and a minor in computer science.
“We had a good business model back then, and I wasn’t going to change my business to fit the software,” Davis says.
More butchering meant higher prices, and Davis launched a production line for boxed beef in 1992.
Davis is taking me for a drive through Omaha’s beef history, pointing out streets that used to be filled with blocks of stockyards and thousands of cattle.
Davis says he will never abandon his restaurant customers, a business that is still quite lucrative.

The orginal article.