Summary of “How Breaking Bad Became a Phenomenon”

Breaking Bad was not a ratings hit, not a household name, not a show that earned a spot in the zeitgeist for several years.
A show about a guy cooking crystal meth and he’s the hero? What did I expect? When I got a call from my agent saying, “Hey, the folks at AMC want to meet with you about your project,” I said, “Which project?” That’s how far gone I was.
We thought the show would be male-skewing, so there’s forty to fifty million men who will be coming off this event, and this is what we would launch Breaking Bad into.
Looking back, there were countless moments like that where Breaking Bad shouldn’t have succeeded, but the material was strong enough to overcome it.2007 – 2008: HIGHS & LOWSOn November 5, 2007, the Writers Guild of America began a strike that would last four months, halting production on more than 60 shows.
Coverage at the time noted that the show was bucking the usual downward trend; most serialized dramas see their audience shrink over time, while Breaking Bad’s kept growing.
Aaron Paul: Breaking Bad was one of the first series people binge-watched, because the first three seasons all plopped onto Netflix at once.
Melissa Bernstein: Vince is actually a masterful marketing mind, and at every turn he had great ideas about how to make the show indelible, how to make it stand out, how to make it really specific in the marketplace.
We were putting so much energy into these little campaigns, these guerrilla tactics, that it was a shock at some point to realize, Oh my god, people are actually watching the show! We had been in a very grassroots place, thinking, How do we get five more people to watch? And the show finally just took on a momentum of its own around Season Four.Aaron Paul: We lived and breathed these characters.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Alone: Lessons on Solitude From an Antarctic Explorer”

Fewer are familiar with another tale of Antarctic adventure, that of the almost five months Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd spent alone at the bottom of the world in 1934.
While Byrd’s journey was not outward but inward, his expedition to the farthest reaches of solitude covered a significant amount of ground, circumscribing the spirit of man and his place in the universe.
Why Byrd Decided to Spend a Season of Solitude at the Bottom of the World.
To address these yearnings, Byrd came up with a plan that aimed to kill two birds with one stone: during the long, dark Antarctic winter, he would man, alone, “The first inland station ever occupied in the world’s southernmost continent.” While the rest of his expedition team remained at the Little America base along the coast of the Ross Ice Shelf, Byrd would set up camp at Bolling Advance Weather Base on Antarctica’s colder, even more barren interior.
While Byrd discovered that a life lived in solitude offered many consolations, he was also very cognizant of its challenges.
While Byrd enjoyed two healthy, insight-filled months of solitude, thereafter conditions at Advance Weather Base unfortunately took a near-fatal turn, and cut short Byrd’s sojourn there.
If you plunged into a prolonged period of solitude and silence, away from every besetting distraction, what would happen to your mind? What insights would you discover? Would they be the same as Byrd’s? Different?
While most of us will never experience a state of silent solitude of the prolonged, all-encompassing kind inhabited by Richard E. Byrd, we can all find more pockets of it in our daily lives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Nintendo Labo Almost Tossed In Trash At Ratings Board”

Germany’s software ratings board almost had an unfortunate accident with Nintendo’s innovative and recently announced Labo kits.
The USK tweeted that after receiving the kits for ratings, cleaning staff mistook the bits and pieces of cardboard and paper that make up the peripherals for Labo as trash.
USK January 18, 2018 Basteln gehört natürlich zum Testprozess dazu! Anmalen ist für die Altersprüfung leider nicht relevant, überhaupt Ihr wisst doch wir können nur Kennzeichen malen 🎨.- USK January 18, 2018 Nintendo Labo was unveiled during a surprise announcement earlier this week.
Labo appears to deliver not just new ways to play for the Nintendo Switch, but a bit of learning along the way as the process of building the cardboard peripherals seems designed to teach as well.
Nintendo says you can use the kits to build a functioning 13-key piano that brings your musical creations to life once the Nintendo Switch console and Right Joy-Con controller are inserted.
With another kit you can control a motorbike by constructing a functioning set of handlebars, with a Joy-Con inserted in each side and the Nintendo Switch console cradled in the middle.
The Variety Kit, one of the two that Labo launches with, allows you to make a variety of Toy-Con including two Toy-Con RC Cars, a Toy-Con Fishing Rod, a Toy-Con House, a Toy-Con Motorbike and a Toy-Con Piano.
Both kits include everything you need to assemble your Toy-Con creations, including the building materials and relevant Nintendo Switch software.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Whole Foods employees reveal why stores are facing a crisis of food shortages”

Whole Foods employees say stores are suffering from food shortages because of a newly implemented inventory-management system called order-to-shelf, or OTS. Whole Foods says the system reduces unnecessary inventory, lowers costs, and frees up employees to focus on customer service.
Whole Foods is facing a crush of food shortages in stores that’s leading to empty shelves, furious customers, and frustrated employees.
Whole Foods employees say the problems began before the acquisition.
They blame the shortages on a buying system called order-to-shelf that Whole Foods implemented across its stores early last year.
Business Insider spoke with seven Whole Foods employees, from cashiers to department managers, who asked to remain anonymous for fear of retribution.
Whole Foods gets stores to comply with OTS by instructing managers to regularly walk through store aisles and storage rooms with checklists to make sure every item is in its right place and there is no excess stock.
“We’re moving basically from a federated system of purchasing to a unified system of purchasing, and we expect to see a lot of cost savings there,” Glenda Flanagan, a Whole Foods executive vice president, said on an earnings call in May. The company has also said OTS frees up employees to focus on customer service.
One employee at a Texas Whole Foods store said that when Amazon representatives at a recent question-and-answer session were asked about stocking issues, they indicated they weren’t aware of the problems and said they would have to be addressed with Whole Foods’ leadership.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How U.S. Soccer ignores talented Hispanic players like Jonathan Gonzalez”

All across the country, there are thousands of talented youth soccer players who never get spotted by the professional soccer apparatus.
Perhaps more concerning, many of the disadvantaged players who do find their way into the American soccer system against the odds eventually leave it after discovering they’re not valued as highly as players who were on a path towards a place in the Development Academy – the league for U.S. Soccer’s designated elite youth soccer clubs – from a young age.
“How many people in charge can relate to what’s going on with players? You have Hugo Perez – who was let go by the U.S. Soccer federation – who discovered Jonathan Gonzalez and valued him,” he says.
“The perception of Alianza is that they help Mexican teams, but I don’t think that’s true. They provide an opportunity for Hispanic players who are being passed up by our own system. MLS teams have forbidden players who play for their academies to go to Alianza and I don’t agree with that. We need to do what’s best for the players. I think U.S. Soccer should work with Alianza.”
“Right from the start, we showed those players how serious we are. The transition from the academy to the first team is clear to see with the players that we play and the players that we sell.”
Major League Soccer has a deep history of Hispanic outreach, especially with securing talented players and developing those athletes in MLS academies.
“You can look at Hispanic players and say they’re more technical and less athletic, but we’ve lost sight of how valuable those players can be.
How come these players are integral players in different teams, in different styles of soccer, but American soccer doesn’t see value in them?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can the Cavs’ Season Be Saved?”

The Cavs might be at their best-especially against the Warriors’ Lineup of Death-with LeBron at the 5.
LeBron’s future looms over this season, and it’s quickly moving from the background to the foreground as the trade deadline approaches.
Ryan: Let’s talk about those “Cavs players.” Is it at all conceivable that this is not LeBron? Is Kevin Love the personnel chessmaster leaking stories to the press?
Under LeBron pressure, the Cavs include the Brooklyn pick-which, even though it’s depreciating, is the first good pick they will have had since they took Wiggins and traded him for Turtleneck up there-in a deal that sends Tristan Thompson to Los Angeles for DeAndre Jordan.
Once the season begins, NBA teams are notoriously short on time, but are we talking about a deeper institutional rot if the team can’t make time to get players in shape and up to date on strategy?
The organization-from the moves the front office makes to who and how they play-runs through LeBron.
LeBron’s reluctance to give definitive answers about his future is forcing the front office to “Well actually” any outcries to provide him any more immediate help.
LeBron can be a great player, great teammate, and great person, and also a detrimental force, because his agenda only aligns with his franchise’s for as long as it can provide him the necessary means to compete for a title.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These are the people paying journalists to promote brands in articles”

If you want to understand the vulnerable state of the news industry, don’t just consider the thinning newsrooms of national publications – look at the writers who are being paid to plug brands on sites like Forbes and the Huffington Post.
Those writers described an upside-down version of journalism, in the trenches of the contributor networks at Entrepreneur and the Huffington Post, where shadowy marketing agencies with whom they have standing relationships pay them to promote certain brands.
In an email I obtained that was written to an SEO consultant, a person who identified himself as a Scottish “Blogger outreach supplier” calling himself Robert Gill even attached a price list: a mention in Forbes cost $1,200, Inc. cost $1,100, Entrepreneur cost $900 and the Huffington Post cost just $500. In the email, Gill also provided a list of articles into which he said he had placed links.
Since the Huffington Post representative declined to address Law’s vanishing articles, their disappearance is open to interpretation.
Huffington Post contributors were able to publish, edit, and delete their own articles, so maybe Law removed the articles herself.
Articles on the sites Gill advertised – Forbes, Inc., Entrepreneur and the Huffington Post – as well as The Next Web all use nofollow links, meaning that links in their articles are tagged in such a way that most search engines ignore them when ranking web content.
Three articles published by the pair on the same day this past November, for example, each contain a single link to a different service that writes essays for students, one of which promised a “Plagiarism Free Guarantee.” According to the Huffington Post’s timestamps on the three articles, they were published at 9:26 a.m., 9:27 a.m., and 9:56 a.m. In addition to those three stories, eight more articles appeared under the duo’s co-byline on the same day.
The Huffington Post representative declined to address questions about specific contributors, but articles by Aziz and Swank also started to disappear while I was working on this story, replaced with messages that read “This post from The Huffington Post Contributor Platform is no longer available on our site.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook killing news is the best thing that ever happened to news”

On January 12, Facebook announced that it would begin to de-prioritize news publishers and their stories in users’ News Feed over highly engaged-with content shared between friends and family.
The message is clear: in the messy news landscape of a post-Trump world, Facebook would like to distance itself from the ugly stuff.
Facebook, despite all its best intentions, is still just a dumb pipe – a thing that delivers, not the thing itself.
For Facebook, it’s bad if you read or watch content without reacting to it on Facebook.
There’s the opportunity for outlets willing to rely less on social networks to set their fate, publishers who have diversified their traffic sources, who have pushed back on Facebook’s News Feed carrots, who have built brands that resonate with audiences beyond what can be bought or given.
Value not gifted by Facebook could be a very good thing for publishers.
Maybe this time, when Facebook tells news organizations to fire 40 writers and hire 40 video producers, everyone will realize that the experiment isn’t always worth it just because people better at the internet than us tell us so.
Facebook, and its lack of understanding about what news is and how it works, made much of the mess we’re in – and profited off of it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “People love Google’s new feature that matches your selfie to a famous painting”

Do you look like the Mona Lisa? Or maybe more of an American Gothic?
Social media is being flooded with Google’s opinions, at least, as part of a new feature that compares a user’s selfie with the company’s catalog of historical artworks, looking for the just-perfect doppelganger.
The update to the Google Arts & Culture App has catapulted it to the most-downloaded free app on the App Store.
It claimed the No. 1 spot in the U.S. on Saturday, according to the app metrics site AppAnnie.
How does Google do it? The app uses computer-vision tech to examine what is similar about your face to the thousands of pieces of art that are shared with Google by museums and other institutions.
Google says this new feature is merely experimental – the app has been around since 2016.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Warren Buffett’s billionaire deputy at Berkshire Hathaway, Charlie Munger, became an “expert-generalist””

Mental models: Charlie Munger’s unique approach to being an expert-generalist.
In connecting the dots across the disciplines, Munger has developed a set of what he calls mental models, which he uses to assess investment opportunities.
The quality of our mental models determines how well we function in the natural world.
Rule #1: Learn multiple models “The first rule is that you’ve got to have multiple models - because if you just have one or two that you’re using, the nature of human psychology is such that you’ll torture reality so that it fits your models.”
Rule #2: Learn multiple models from multiple disciplines “And the models have to come from multiple disciplines - because all the wisdom of the world is not to be found in one little academic department.”
Rule #4: Use a checklist to ensure you’re factoring in the right models “Use a checklist to be sure you get all of the main models.”
Rule #5: Create multiple checklists and use the right one for the situation “You need a different checklist and different mental models for different companies. I can never make it easy by saying, ‘Here are three things.’ You have to drive it yourself to ingrain it in your head for the rest of your life.”
Each master manual is 50+ pages long and includes: A 101 Overview of the mental model An Advanced overview that includes a more nuanced explanation.

The orginal article.