Summary of “China’s leaders are softening their stance on AI”

China might be at loggerheads with the United States over trade, but it is calling for a friendlier approach to the development of artificial intelligence.
Speaking at the World Artificial Intelligence Conference in Shanghai this week, China’s vice premier, Liu He, said that AI would depend heavily on international cooperation.
Xi said that China would “Share results with other countries in the field of artificial intelligence.” He also called for collaboration between nations on AI topics such as ethics, law, governance, and security.
China’s tech industry has already embraced machine learning and AI at an impressive rate.
China’s ambitions and progress to date have led to talk of an artificial-intelligence arms race with the US. In fact, the technology is largely a product of collaboration among researchers from around the world.
The influence of China’s tech industry is growing internationally as its companies export AI to other parts of the world through cloud computing services.
The statements from China’s political leaders may also constitute something of a soft-power play.
How the technology spreads to the rest of the world is still very much up for negotiation, and China no doubt wants to guide discussions concerning standards and norms.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to solve America’s dual pain and opioid crises”

While most opioid deaths are now linked to illicit opioids like heroin and fentanyl, the roots of the epidemic lie in the easy prescribing of opioid painkillers – which led not just to misuse by patients, but also misuse by recreational users who could buy or otherwise obtain a new supply of excess pills from friends, family, and the black market.
So I reached out to experts with a question: How do you fix opioid overprescribing without leaving behind pain patients?
1) Reduce opioid prescriptions – with caution America prescribes far more opioids than any other country in the world.
The research increasingly suggests that opioids are far from a panacea for pain in general and are likely a bad idea in the majority of cases for chronic pain – in large part because people develop a tolerance to opioid effects so quickly that the pain relief over time wears off, even as the risks of overdose and addiction remain or increase.
In response, lawmakers across the country have imposed caps on the number of days – typically three or seven – that opioids can be prescribed to acute pain patients, as well as other restrictions for chronic pain prescribing.
It also may involve other kinds of services, such as emotional support to address the anxiety that patients can feel if they’re worried that losing opioids will bring back their pain or comprehensive chronic pain treatments that help address the pain that opioids couldn’t.
This is the “Fundamental problem” with efforts to cut back opioid prescriptions that don’t make alternative pain treatments more accessible, said Beth Darnall, a pain psychologist at Stanford: “We can’t just go in and impose limits without providing a sufficient infrastructure of alternatives.”
“If you’re in excruciating pain, it sucks. And I’ve had pain conditions myself. But not all pain is intolerable or needs to be pushed down to zero with an opioid.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Pretend Billionaire Jho Low Threw Insane Parties for Celebs and Vanished”

Malaysian-born Wharton grad Jho Low was perhaps best known for his love of partying with celebrities.
A mastermind behind a state-owned Malaysian investment fund known as 1MDB, the US Department of Justice has claimed in a civil-forfeiture action that Low helped siphon off billions from the fund through fraudulent deals and complex money laundering.
With the kind of money Low was throwing around, he was well past living the lifestyle of the rich and famous.
VICE talked to the authors to find out how Low cultivated an image as a billionaire and got in with the one percent, what his story says about the elite and high society of the world, and why law enforcement can’t catch the alleged swindler.
In the 20s, Old Money still held a sway over Gatsby, but Low cared more about celebrity.
Even now, Low is sending messages from his hiding spot in China, offering to help out the Malaysian government in negotiations to recover the money.
Low helped negotiate a number of dodgy infrastructure deals last year between China and Malaysia, from which money was allegedly stolen.
The new government wants to cancel the infrastructure projects and has charged Low in absentia for money laundering.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You’re Making a Better First Impression Than You Think”

Is there anything worse than meeting people? I don’t think so! Sure, they might become lovers, or lifelong friends, or even short-term friends, but more often than not, the people you meet just become people you met.
For many of us, people we met just become people we aren’t sure liked us.
That’s not the norm – in fact, new research suggests that most people like you more than you think.
In an incredibly awkward-sounding experiment, researchers forced small talk among their subjects, who were strangers, and then asked them to rate their conversation partners, and to estimate how their partners rated them.
The researchers found that participants consistently underestimated how well their conversation partners rated them and enjoyed their company, a phenomenon which they named “The liking gap.” This gap was found to be especially high for shy subjects, who tended to assume their partners basically hated their guts.
Interestingly, researchers noticed that the so-called liking gap persisted beyond the initial meeting – a number of the subjects were surveyed several times between meeting at the start of the school year and May, and even those who became friends still underestimated how much they were liked.
No matter how long the conversations, or how much the subjects reported liking their new friends, they viewed their own conversational skills harshly.
“Conversation appears to be a domain in which people display uncharacteristic pessimism about their performance,” said the researchers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Welcome to Paris’s Delicious, Wine-Soaked, Never-Ending Block Party”

Similar joints exist across Paris, but what sets Savoir Vivre’s apart is that all four of its venues-Vivant, Déviant, Da Graziella, and Hôtel Bourbon-are owned by 30-year-old Arnaud Lacombe, who, by a mixture of luck and an intuitive sense of how young people like to party, did the opposite of what most restaurateurs do.
Arnaud’s food-and-libation kingdom is called Savoir Vivre, which literally translates to “Knowing how to live.” Though he didn’t plan to create one of the city’s most raucous nightlife destinations, Arnaud was determined to design an experience around something he thought was too hard to find in Paris: pure pleasure.
So Arnaud bought two sleepy restaurants on the same block and decided to do something drastically un-French: turn one of them, originally a Belle Époque bird shop, into a Neapolitan pizza joint.
Shortly thereafter, Arnaud met a hungry 23-year-old chef named Pierre Touitou, whom he installed in the cramped kitchen of the other restaurant, which he opened as Vivant in 2016.
As is a good all-night rager at Hôtel Bourbon, Arnaud’s third property, which inhabits the basement of the old Bronco space.
Since hosting its first party, in October 2017, Hôtel Bourbon has become a clubhouse for the French fashion elite and celebs like Kid Cudi and Emily Ratajkowski, but Guillaume and Arnaud make sure the 200 guests who make it past the velvet rope represent Paris’s socio-cultural flavor.
There you have the ultimate Paris party game plan, a road map for how to enjoy life in style.
Do any Parisians really spend a whole day on Rue des Petites Écuries, eating pizza Margherita at Da Graziella for lunch, having a glass of Vincent Charlot at Déviant, tucking into whatever Pierre is braising and torching for dinner at Vivant, and then hitting Hôtel Bourbon till the sun comes up? “A lot of friends do it almost every day,” says Arnaud.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Learn Basic Pet First Aid With This Red Cross App”

When I first got my dog I spent a lot of time calling the vets office.
My furball also has an affinity for street food, and by street food I mean food other people have discarded on the street.
Now The Red Cross has released an app that will make other new pet parent’s lives a tiny bit easier.
Called “Pet First Aid” the app offers advice on what’s normal behavior for your pet, and what to do in situations where your pet is having trouble.
Just like people, having someone on hand that can administer CPR to a pet can be a literal lifesaver.
For issues the app can’t help you with, it can help you find the nearest vet hospital.
You can also use the app to find a pet-friendly hotel.
Having an app on your phone isn’t a replacement for a real vet, just like WebMD isn’t a replacement for a doctor, but reading through some of the info can give you a decent understanding of how to care for your pet, something that could be invaluable when that emergency actually does come along.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 ways you’re destroying your glass stovetop”

It’s fine to use the soft side of your sponge to wipe down your glass cooktop.
Steel wool, on the other hand, can leave deep pits in the surface of your stovetop.
Hold it at a 45-degree angle and skim the grossness off the glass.
Cleansers can quickly burn and damage the finish of the glass, leaving pits or boils.
Extra elbow grease can put too much pressure on the glass, making it crack.
I know it seems logical to use a glass cleaner on a glass stovetop, but it’s not a good idea.
The ammonia in the glass cleaner is too strong for cleaning a stove top and can lead to damage.
Here’s the best way to clean your stovetop without damaging it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Paper Trails: Living and Dying With Fragmented Medical Records”

Every year, an untold number of patients undergo duplicate procedures – or fail to get them in the first place – because key pieces of their medical history go missing.
Without an easy way to get a patient’s full medical files, I must ask where their prior doctors were, have the patients sign a release form, fax it to the other hospitals, and receive stacks of papers in return.
Patients may be the biggest advocates for sharing medical information, says Mark Savage, director of health policy at the University of California, San Francisco’s Center for Digital Health Innovation.
A 2014 survey of more than 2,000 patients by Mark Savage, then with the National Partnership for Women & Families, and colleagues showed that 95 percent felt electronic records “Were useful in assuring timely access to relevant information by all of their health care providers.” And more than three-quarters said they already share information with their health care providers all or most of the time.
Over my last few years as a doctor, I can’t think of a time when a patient complained that a doctor knew too much of their medical history.
How much is faulty record sharing to blame? My colleague, Marta Almli, an internal medicine doctor, surveyed the resident physicians at my hospital and others and found widespread dissatisfaction with how we obtain medical records: among 58 physicians surveyed, 81 percent said it was “Somewhat difficult” or “Extremely difficult” to get information about patients who transferred from another health care facility.
One of the most widely used electronic health vendors called Epic has a “Care Everywhere” platform, which helps facilities share electronic patient records quickly and efficiently.
There were some records, but for discharge patients they were stored in a paper binder in a separate storage facility.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your gut is directly connected to your brain, by a newly discovered neuron circuit”

The human gut is lined with more than 100 million nerve cells-it’s practically a brain unto itself.
The gut actually talks to the brain, releasing hormones into the bloodstream that, over the course of about 10 minutes, tell us how hungry it is, or that we shouldn’t have eaten an entire pizza.
A new study reveals the gut has a much more direct connection to the brain through a neural circuit that allows it to transmit signals in mere seconds.
The study reveals “a new set of pathways that use gut cells to rapidly communicate with the brain stem,” says Daniel Drucker, a clinician-scientist who studies gut disorders at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute in Toronto, Canada, who was not involved with the work.
Enteroendocrine cells, which stud the lining of the gut and produce hormones that spur digestion and suppress hunger, had footlike protrusions that resemble the synapses neurons use to communicate with each other.
They would have to send the signals through the vagus nerve, which travels from the gut to the brain stem.
That’s much faster than hormones can travel from the gut to the brain through the bloodstream, Bohórquez says.
Additional clues about how gut sensory cells benefit us today lie in a separate study, published today in.

The orginal article.