Summary of “Is It Time to Give Up on Fish Oil?”

Large population studies with solid data both on the participants’ diets and causes of disease and death bolstered the beliefs that eating fish often was a heart-healthy practice linked to reduced rates of cardiovascular disease.
A comprehensive analysis conducted by Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian and Eric Rimm of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that eating two servings of fatty fish a week – equal to about two grams of omega-3 fatty acids – lowered the risk of death from heart disease by more than a third and total deaths by 17 percent.
The question is whether the observed cardiovascular benefits often found among fish eaters is due solely to the oils in fish or to some other characteristics of seafood or to still other factors common to those who eat lots of fish, like eating less meat or pursuing a healthier lifestyle over all.
While this does not necessarily mean the supplements are unhelpful, it does suggest a more nuanced consideration of who, if anyone, may benefit from taking fish oils and whether we all might be better off simply eating more fish, even though that too can have some downsides as well as benefits.
In both observational studies and controlled clinical trials, eating fish was shown to foster optimal development of a baby’s brain and nervous system, prompting advice that pregnant women and nursing mothers eat more fish rich in omega-3s while avoiding species that may contain mercury or other contaminants like PCBs sometimes found in freshwater fish.
The declining supplies and rising costs of wild-caught fish have spawned a worldwide explosion of fish farming, which also has its downsides.
Marine organisms used to feed farmed fish can diminish this vital food supply for wild stock, and fish that escape from farms may change the gene pool of wild fish.
If the cost of wild fish is a concern, farmed salmon typically has as much or more omega-3s as wild-caught salmon, which can be three times as expensive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bill Hader on ‘SNL’ Characters, HBO’s ‘Barry,’ Loving Show Business”

Inside Farmshop, an overcrowded, overloud Santa Monica, California, artisanal-type-food joint, the 20-year-old Bill Hader is giving the 39-year-old Bill Hader a pretty good goddamn dressing down.
Sitting there – regular jeans, dark blue sweater, very California casual, fork in hand, knife bearing down on steak – he just laughs, shakes his head, arches his grand Hader eyebrows, bulges his big Hader eyeballs, gives a snort of disbelief and carries on.
All around town and beyond, Hader is known as one of the nicest guys ever.
“I have not seen another side of him,” says Henry Winkler, who costars with Hader in his new serio-comic HBO series, Barry, about about a hit man who decides to take an acting class and become an actor.
As a teenager, Hader used his dad’s video camera to make “Little horror and comedy shorts with my sisters,” he says.
“You know,” Hader says, “If I were in my 20s and I heard me say that, I’d be like, ‘What? You went to a therapist? Exercise? Meditation? I mean, oh, my God, give me a break.'” Will that 20-year-old ever shut up?
Or what passes for excitement in the world according to Hader.
Then he says, “Yeah, 20-year-old me would fucking kick my ass for listening to jazz, too.” In fact, there seems to be no end of reasons why the young Hader would want to kick the ass of Hader the elder.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Dogs Love Us? Science Explains”

You’re not just imagining it: There’s substantial research to support the claim that dogs truly adore their owners.
While we don’t know exactly how long ago humans started domesticating dogs, some scientists think our friendship could go as far back as 40,000 years.
“Of course dogs love their people!” animal behavior consultant Amy Shojai tells Inverse.
By utilizing functional magnetic resonance imaging scans – which measure brain nerve cell levels – the researchers got an inside look at how dogs responded to their humans’ scent versus familiar dogs, unfamiliar dogs, and unfamiliar people.
As Inverse previously reported, researchers at the University of York recently found that dogs respond more positively to dog-directed speech than when we talk to them like people.
Scientists had 37 dogs listen to people talking to them in “Dog-speak” – that high-pitched voice, coupled with “Dog-relevant” phrases.
Participants would then talk to dogs in a flat done about ordinary things.
The dogs overwhelmingly preferred dog-speak, which the researchers compared to the way people talk to babies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There are good reasons for ignoring the news”

Did you hear about the rich American who’s cut himself off from all news since Donald Trump was elected? There’s no reason why you should.
Plus, his non-consumption of news media seems to involve a lot of slightly precious “Business”.
The NYT interviewer touched upon criticism it had received in a way that, to me, merely encapsulated its appeal: “To avoid current affairs is in some ways a luxury that many people cannot afford.” I mean, why not just liken it to a holiday in the Maldives? A lobster dinner? A dishwasher? Yes, not everybody can afford it: for many, ignoring the news is impossible because it affects them directly – just as, for many, buying a dishwasher is impossible.
You’d need to have ignored the news for a very long time to be willing to believe that’s what Earth is.
That’s appropriately capitalistic: keeping up with the news, like buying a dishwasher, involves purchasing stuff.
Ignoring the news doesn’t add to the GDP and so, unlike other luxuries that do more tangible harm, it can be widely condemned without commercial risk.
Over the past few weeks, while not having to find subjects for columns, my own attitude to reading the news has become a medium-strength raft of sanctions.
The way the news reaches us these days, with so much of it either “Fake” or “Breaking”, is worse than ignorance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Fundamental Skills for First-Time Managers”

If you’re like many leaders in the startup environment, you might be managing people for the first time-possibly without the training and development that leaders in mature companies receive on a regular basis.
Develop your leadership style with these five essential management skills we’ve distilled while consulting with some of the most successful leaders in the world.
Instead, managers need to create the opportunity for new thinking and behavior to take root.
The manager understood this when he encouraged the team to host weekly potlucks.
Everyone on the team knows that sharing ideas and information is critical to the company culture and its success-all because the manager made collaboration a priority, not an afterthought.
A recent Gallup poll showed that managers who received regular feedback were 10% more profitable than those who did not.
Managers are quick to give feedback when anyone on the team is missing the mark.
To get up-to-speed quickly, focus on honing these fundamentals for an instant boost to your impact and effectiveness as a leader: clarify expectations, lead culture, give recognition, ask for feedback, and manage your time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why the popular response to online privacy is so flawed”

When confronted with the issue of online privacy, one of the more popular answers is, “What’s the big deal? I have nothing to hide.” We’ve seen it around the web, hear it from friends and even from those involved in tech.
“The main problem with the ‘nothing to hide’ argument is assuming that privacy is important only if you have something to hide,” said Ignacio Cofone, a New York University research fellow and privacy expert.
“Privacy is not about hiding, it’s about which flow of information is socially appropriate and which isn’t. This argument also obscures the target person. Nothing to hide from whom? There are things that you would share with your partner but not with strangers on the street.”
The “Nothing to hide” argument starts to break down when you consider the different types of people we generally interact with.
“It’s important to acknowledge that privacy isn’t about hiding – it’s about having and exercising more agency over who sees our personal information,” said Rebecca Ricks, a Mozilla fellow and technologist, in an email exchange with Mic.
It’s clear why someone vouching for their rights may not want the government to know every word that they type, but what about those who aren’t protesting? In his TED Talk, journalist Glenn Greenwald revealed the hypocrisy of claiming you have nothing to hide.
The argument of “Nothing to hide” most often means “I’m not doing anything illegal.” You can still be within the bounds of the law but choose not to tweet your mom’s home address or go through the street yelling your passwords.
As he puts it, “Arguing that you don’t care about the right to privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different than saying you don’t care about free speech because you have nothing to say.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are We Already Living in Virtual Reality?”

In 2015, for an art exhibit at the Centre de Cultura Contempor├ánia de Barcelona, Slater’s team built a virtual reality in which participants lived together on a psychedelic tropical island, embodied as elegant humanoids reminiscent of the blue Na’vi, from “Avatar.” In the course of an hour and a half, their virtual bodies grew old and died; after death, the participants reviewed their virtual lives in a flashback, then floated upward into a tunnel of white light.
People who have near-death experiences emerge with new ideas about the meaning of life; Slater’s lab is studying whether virtual death might have a similar effect.
In the book “Experience on Demand,” Jeremy Bailenson, a leading V.R.-embodiment researcher at Stanford, reports that after performing a virtual vivisection he “Simply felt bad. Responsible. I had used my hands to do violence.” Pushing a Punch or Shoot button on a game controller and watching the results on a screen, he writes, is “An entirely different experience” from playing an immersive, first-person V.R. game in which you use your virtual arms and hands to strike or stab an opponent, or to aim a gun at him and pull the trigger.
In embodied virtual reality, it’s sometimes possible to glimpse yourself as the virtual object you really are.
I had been scanned by an imaging system; now, inside the virtual world, I looked into the virtual mirror to see a virtual version of myself, wearing my clothes: blue shirt, gray jeans, brown boots.
Before arriving in Barcelona, I had asked Slater and Sanchez-Vives if I might try a virtual out-of-body experience.
In Frankfurt, over lunch at a Persian restaurant, I described my virtual experiences to Metzinger.
As we walked, Metzinger wondered how virtual reality, by changing how we experience ourselves, might influence religion and art.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet the ‘Lady Gaga of Mathematics’ helming France’s AI task force”

Several months before delivering his new year’s wishes, after a local TEDx presentation in November on “How AI Will Revolutionize Health,” I sat down with Villani, who was cordial if a bit distant.
Villani’s six-member task force is made up of a machine learning researcher, an engineer with the defense ministry, and four members of a French digital technology advisory council, with expertise in everything from philosophy to law.
Asked if he had an interest in artificial intelligence before he was assigned to the task force, Villani enunciated clearly and deliberately in his high-pitched, slightly theatrical French: “The subject had grown so significantly that you would have to have been blind and deaf not to be interested.” In any case, “The big concerns are not really about the most technical issues.” He has indicated in the past that he hopes to avoid AI’s potentially “Devastating effects on economic issues and the democratic fabric,” partly by making sure that AI is “Everybody’s business.” Hence his large-scale offensive in the French press to educate the public and his push to seek broad-ranging input for his report.
In November, Villani estimated that he would speak to 250 people for the AI report and finish it by the end of January.
A researcher at the French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation, Schoenauer has spent 30 years studying artificial intelligence and is the AI expert on Villani’s task force.
During the task force’s three-hour hearings, Schoenauer said, interviewees would, one by one, make a statement of their recommendations, which would be followed by a discussion, after which Villani would circle back to issues that interested him.
On working with Villani, Schoenauer commented, “He’s very impressive, first of all, because of the amount of work he can do.” He also noted that Villani had to head or contribute to other task forces and is a regular member of Parliament.
While his colleague Marc Schoenauer was looking forward to returning to his research after the delivery of the AI report, Villani’s talents will be required for its implementation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ben Simmons Bursts His Own Bubble”

An NBA court is 94 feet wide and 50 feet tall, and at only 21 years old, Ben Simmons manipulates the geometry of his surroundings about as well as any player.
Basketball isn’t played in a vacuum, but Simmons does seem to operate in a physical bubble.
There will be at least 6 feet between Simmons and his closest defender on nearly every play he initiates.
A Martian catching an ESPN broadcast from outer space would wonder why Simmons is the only player in the NBA with an undetectable repulsion field.
On one play in Philadelphia’s blowout win over Minnesota on Saturday, Simmons just stopped.
No full-time point guard in NBA history has been as tall as Simmons.
There are 11 three-man units that allow fewer than 100 points per 100 possessions; seven of them are Sixers lineups, and six of them involve Simmons.
The way in which Simmons is defended is unlike all but one starting ball handler in the league, a player who had at one time exemplified the same joy that Simmons evokes today.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kacey Musgraves’s ‘Golden Hour’: March 2018 Cover Story”

On a dreary afternoon in late March, Kacey Musgraves pulls up to a Walgreens in the town of Sioux City, which sits at the intersection of South Dakota, Nebraska, and Iowa, tucked just inside the border of the latter.
Earlier in the day, we were sitting at Crave, a regional “Fusion” chain Musgraves found on Yelp that rests next to the Missouri River in the shadow of the arena where she’s playing tonight and a Hard Rock Hotel & Casino where I’ll later lose money playing roulette.
Where Musgraves had previously worked closely with a small group of collaborators headlined by the songwriters Shane McAnally and Luke Laird, Golden Hour was created with a different team: Ian Fitchuk and Daniel Tashian, two Nashville-based songwriters and session players who Musgraves knew previously but had never written with.
“Butterflies,” the first song Musgraves wrote after meeting Kelly, is about how the excitement of a new crush can make you feel like you’ve rediscovered yourself.
The album began to take shape in the fall of 2016, after Musgraves met Tashian and Fitchuk at Tashian’s house in Nashville.
Musgraves says Fitchuk and Tashian were crucial in landing the album in a place that still felt true to her artistry.
The conversation surrounding Musgraves inevitably ends up settling in the same spot: hand-wringing over her place in modern country music.
In Sioux City, Musgraves ends her set with her latest single, the disco experiment “High Horse.” She walks off the stage under a shower of confetti and into the bowels of the arena, where she goofs around with her band for Instagram content before retreating back to her bus as Little Big Town takes the stage.

The orginal article.