Summary of “Flexport’s epic plan to build a freight empire with its $110M raise”

“We’re actually out here trying to create value, not just give venture capital money away” says Flexport CEO Ryan Petersen.
Flexport already moves 7,000 shipping containers a month for an average of $2,000 each while taking around a 15% cut, earning it roughly $2.1 million per month from ocean freight alone.
“There’s an Amazon-like element for the enterprise”- Ryan Petersen, Flexport CEO. Now after TechCrunch reported last month that sources told us Flexport had raised a $110 million Series C at an $800 million pre-money valuation, the company today confirmed the deal.
Flexport wants to finance its customers freight, not just ship it.
Customers like Ring, Osmo, and Le Tote could get their freight financed and forwarded all at once, cutting down their logistical headaches while giving Flexport more.
Petersen says Flexport can have “More control” with “Our software, our process in the warehouse.”
Flexport opened its first 12,000 square foot cross-port in Hong Kong two months ago and it’s already jam-packed, so it’s planning to move to a bigger space like the 100,000 square foot spot it has in LA. Petersen says the plan is to open 25 of these, beyond its nine offices that house 500 employees.
Despite its budding empire, Flexport is still only the 23rd-largest freight forwarder.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Domestic Dog is the book we’ve been waiting for since 1995”

Which brings me to James Serpell’s highly anticipated second edition of “The Domestic Dog: Its Evolution, Behavior, and Interactions with People.” This edition captures the current state of all things dog: “What we truly know – and what we don’t know – about the evolution, natural history, and behavior of Canis familiaris.”
In a podcast interview, Serpell reflected on the popularity of the 1995 first edition: “It seemed to be timed to coincide with the professionalization of dog science. It seemed to be a prelude to people suddenly becoming interested in dog behavior, dog cognition, and things like that.”
Jam-packed with studies and references, “If you are a serious student of domestic dog behavior, you need this book,” offers Patricia McConnell, PhD, CAAB. Two incredibly valuable chapters, one on learning and training methods and the other on the field of applied animal behavior, highlight that whether we realize it or not, we are constantly telling dogs stuff, giving them information, putting some training ideology onto or into them – all of which can affect their behavior and relationships with us.
One survey-based study identified that, “More than a quarter of surveyed dog owners reported that intimidation-based training techniques such as hitting, growling, grabbing and shaking the jowls or scruff, or punitively rolling the dog on its back resulted in aggression by the dog.” On the other hand, understanding the risks, yet possible use, of punishment to decrease the frequency of certain behaviors is important as well.
In their role as family members we may ascribe human-qualities to them – sometimes ones they can’t live up to – instead of exploring and embracing what it is like to be a dog, an area covered extensively in this edition in chapters on early life and behavioral development, dog social behaviors and communication, and social cognition.
“The Domestic Dog” is also a reminder that the dog is not set in stone.
Dog lovers looking not to perpetuate inherited defects can consider using a Puppy Contract if considering purchasing a dog, or checking out Love is Blind, a 3-minute video narrated by veterinarians and welfare specialists on changing the trend.
“The Domestic Dog” also suggests dog policies be informed by research, particularly when multiple studies draw similar conclusions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Research-Based Strategies for Overcoming Procrastination”

In one time log I kept, I found that over the course of one week, I spent six hours putting off tasks – and that’s just the procrastination that was apparent from my time log.
The more averse you find a task, the more likely you are to procrastinate.
When a task sets off procrastination triggers, we resist doing it.
What about 30 minutes? Shorten the amount of time until you find a period with which you’re no longer resistant to the task – and then do it.
That’s because the tasks that induce procrastination are rarely as bad as we think.
Getting started on something forces a subconscious reappraisal of that work, where we might find that the actual task sets off fewer triggers than we originally anticipated.
There are proven ways to combat procrastination so that it doesn’t get in the way of accomplishing your most important tasks.
The next time you resist a task, consider whether it sets off any of the procrastination triggers, work within your resistance level, force yourself to get started on it, list the costs of putting the task off, or disconnect from the internet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet the two amazing women running across America”

The 55-year-old grandmother began running “Out of total vanity” almost two decades ago, and somehow she got hooked on seeking out – then crushing – the most grueling long-distance challenges possible.
“The human body is an amazing machine,” Anderson said, before she set out on the run.
“So for me, it’s, What is it capable of achieving? What can I do for myself? Can my body run across America? Is my mind strong enough to take me?”.
That same year, across the Atlantic in northern California, Sandra Villines had just started running to get in shape and be a role model for her daughter.
Villines – who goes by Sandra Vi – is running to break the record simultaneously.
Villines, 44, closely followed Pete Kostelnick’s record-setting 2016 run across the U.S. and thought, “All right, I can do that.” She checked off a bunch of 50K races before a victory in Death Valley in the Badwater 135 in July.
Both women know the other is running; and both are adamant that they will focus on their attempt, and their attempt alone.
Erson’s first route was based solely off Google Maps, but crowdsourcing from running communities across the country helped her cross off impassable routes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Western society is chronically sleep deprived’: the importance of the body’s clock”

The cycle of day and night on our planet is age-old and inescapable, so the idea of an internal body clock might not sound that radical.
“All of western society is a little bit sleep deprived and, when I say a little bit, I mean chronically.”
In the past decade scientists have shown that clock genes are active in almost every cell type in the body.
Saper’s team has found that animals that don’t get enough sleep, but keep their circadian pattern, do not gain weight.
As the impact of scientific advance slowly trickles down, the medical profession and society at large are waking up to the power of the biological clock.
The US Navy has altered its shift system to align it with the 24-hour clock, rather than the 18-hour day used in the old British system.
Schools are experimenting with later school days, better aligned with the teenage body clock, which runs several hours later than that of adults.
As circadian rhythms have journeyed from obscure corner of science to part of the zeitgeist, companies are launching an increasing number of products on the back of a new anxiety around sleep and natural cycles.

The orginal article.

Summary of “J.J. Barea’s message on behalf of Puerto Rico: Every little bit helps”

The Puerto Rico where I grew up was an island of beauty.
In Puerto Rico, our infrastructure is not like in the U.S. A little rainstorm and you lose electricity for 24 hours.
We have an amazing community of Puerto Ricans and Latinos in Dallas and they were already gathering donations.
With me were my wife and 10 of my best friends from Dallas, almost all Puerto Ricans.
While in Puerto Rico, I saw signs of U.S. assistance.
This is the message the people in Puerto Rico wanted me to take back to the States.
One of my friends said every day is like a bad movie, over and over again.
So here’s what I’d like to say to anyone reading this story: Every little bit helps.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How AI Could Change Amazon: A Thought Experiment”

As advances in AI make prediction cheaper, economic theory dictates that we’ll use prediction more frequently and widely, and the value of complements to prediction – like human judgment – will rise.
Most shoppers have noticed Amazon’s recommendation engine while they shop – it offers suggestions of items that their AI predicts you will want to buy.
At some point, as they turn the knob, the AI’s prediction accuracy crosses a threshold, such that it becomes in Amazon’s interest to change its business model.
Better predictions will attract more shoppers, more shoppers will generate more data to train the AI, more data will lead to better predictions, and so on, creating a virtuous circle.
Today, in the case of AI, some companies are making early bets anticipating that the dial on the prediction machine will start turning faster once it gains momentum.
First, they must invest in developing a better understanding of how fast and how far the dial on their prediction machines will turn for their sector and applications.
Second, they must invest in developing a thesis about the strategy options created by the shifting economics of their business that result from turning the dial, similar to the thought experiment we considered for Amazon.
The overarching theme for initiating an AI strategy? Close your eyes, imagine putting your fingers on the dial of your prediction machine, and, in the immortal words of Spinal Tap, turn it to eleven.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jackson Hole Revived Hollywood’s Most Powerful Speech for a Stirring New Tourism Campaign – Adweek”

So begins a stirring new ad from Jackson Hole, Wyo.’s Travel and Tourism Board.
It’s part of a national campaign that rolls out this week, shucking tired tourism cliches in favor of an emotional call to action crafted squarely for our time.
It sets the tone for the entire “Stay Wild” campaign, which the city hopes will become a movement much like “Keep Portland Weird.” The effort includes print and digital ads, an influencer program, murals in New York and San Francisco, and an experiential Super Bowl installation.
“Sometimes new business pitches are very stoic. We presented that video, and there were tears,” said group creative director Dustin Black.
Kate Sollitt, executive director of the Jackson Hole Travel and Tourism Board, said the group was immediately sold on the concept’s guts and versatility.
“Colle McVoy really kind of blew everybody out of the water,” she told Adweek during Advertising Week in New York.
More than most mountain towns, Jackson Hole is wary of visitors.
“It’s as much of a community campaign as it is a national one. We were really sensitive to make something that seemed genuine. Tourism advertising very quickly gets cliché or lofty or aspirational or ‘let your wild out!'”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is Maryellis Bunn the Millennial Walt Disney?”

The Museum of Ice Cream, in San Francisco, is not a museum.
It is, per its co-founder and creative director, Maryellis Bunn, an Experience.
Bunn and her business partner, Manish Vora, who previously worked on Wall Street and as CEO of Lightbox, an event space in New York, opened the first Museum of Ice Cream last summer, in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District.
Employees of the museum – Bunn refers to them as the Pink Army – wore light-pink jeans and branded T-shirts and hot-pink aprons.
“Founder and Creative Director, Maryellis Bunn, always dreamed of swimming in an ocean filled with sprinkles,” read the exhibit label.
The museum’s brand is now strong enough that Bunn no longer needs to rely on sponsorship in such an explicit way.
Bunn, who previously consulted independently on design and business strategy for companies like Facebook, and was head of forecasting and innovation at Time Inc., found inspiration for the Museum of Ice Cream in the shifting retail landscape.
Despite the success of the San Francisco location – tickets sold out immediately, and the museum has already extended its run to mid-February – Bunn rated it a three on a scale of one to 100.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Data is Being Manipulated”

At this moment, AI is at the center of every business conversation.
Governments, and researchers are obsessed with data.
We are currently seeing an evolution in how data is being manipulated.
If we believe that data can and should be used to inform people and fuel technology, we need to start building the infrastructure necessary to limit the corruption and abuse of that data - and grapple with how biased and problematic data might work its way into technology and, through that, into the foundations of our society.
In short, I think we need to reconsider what security looks like in a data-driven world.
Part 1: Gaming the SystemLike search engines, social media introduced a whole new target for manipulation.
This attracted all sorts of people, from social media marketers to state actors.
The economic and political incentives are obvious, but alongside these powerful actors, there are also a whole host of people with less-than-obvious intentions coordinating attacks on these systems.

The orginal article.