Summary of “Zach Lowe on DeMar DeRozan, Kyle Lowry and the Toronto Raptors”

As DeMar DeRozan finished practice on Dec. 19, he noticed one Toronto Raptors higher-up after another – Bobby Webster, the team’s GM, and its three highest-ranked coaches – file into team president Masai Ujiri’s office.
Ujiri told DeRozan he could be Toronto’s Kobe – a lifetime player who defines a franchise and, maybe, brings it championship glory.
To get there – to push this live-wire Toronto team to its full potential – DeRozan had to start shooting more 3-pointers.
Two nights later in Philly, he drained 6-of-9 – a performance so stunning, the shots flying off his fingertips so fast, you had to check to make sure it was actually DeMar DeRozan, king of the midrange.
“I still don’t really know,” jokes Kyle Lowry, the symbol – along with DeRozan – of a star-driven offense that sputtered in April and May. Ujiri didn’t fire anyone, even though he had the political capital to do anything he wanted.
They stretched their playmaking skills, and that was the point: When opponents keyed on DeRozan and Lowry, these guys – these unknown kiddos – would have to do something.
Teams struggle to generate spacing, and downsize; questioning Valanciunas’ starter status has become one of Toronto’s rites of spring, along with losing Game 1s. It seemed a fait accompli that their crunch-time playoff lineup would feature Ibaka at center, Anunoby at power forward, and a rotating fifth guy alongside DeRozan and Lowry.
The worst-case scenario is that dissonance translating into a prideful attempt by Lowry and DeRozan to win the old way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Does Tech Need Silicon Valley?”

Crucially, Case theorized, many of the disruptors would not live in Silicon Valley.
Steve Case likes to remind people that Silicon Valley wasn’t always the epicenter of tech culture.
Poring over the available data, Case discovered that plenty of Midwestern and Southwestern cities were leveraging tax incentives to stanch local brain drain, and a few, such as Pittsburgh and Indianapolis, were cultivating their own robust startup scenes.
As Case saw it, there was value in telling the story of communities that had been historically overlooked by investors - in drawing attention to them and “Making them magnets for capital.” Because he was Steve Case, media followed: In 2016, when the tour expanded to five cities, including Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, there were reporters waiting outside the bus.
“Out west, there’s a depth of talent, and there’s a mercenary culture where people jump around from startup to startup,” Case said.
Shortly after the last presidential election, Steve Case had drinks with the venture capitalist J.D. Vance at Riggsby, a bar off Dupont Circle in downtown Washington, D.C. Case lives in the capital; Vance, the author of the bestselling Hillbilly Elegy, about the poor, white communities of the Midwest, was in town for an appearance on one of the Sunday talk shows.
For months, Case had been batting around the idea of raising cash for the logical next step in his Rise initiative - a massive seed fund for early-stage startups outside of Boston, New York, or California.
In a TED talk-ish introduction, Case reminded the audience that “America itself was a startup” and recalled the days when major technology companies - from IBM to AOL - had sprouted up far from Silicon Valley.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tracy Morgan Is a Survivor. And ‘a Better Man Now.'”

When they began work on “The Last O.G.” – FX passed on the series, citing creative differences, but TBS picked it up – Cedric said he expected that Mr. Morgan would be changed by his experiences.
Even though Mr. Morgan could simply sit on his Walmart settlement and grow old, Cedric said this was not his desire, though he could not entirely disguise how this windfall had affected him, either.
In these moments, Cedric said, Mr. Morgan would eventually regain his composure and his underlying generosity would shine through.
“It might not be Peter Luger, but whatever he’s got, he’s going to show people that he appreciates them.”
Ms. Haddish, the “Girls Trip” star, said that she saw a lot of genuine affection in the flashback scenes of “The Last O.G.” that show Tray and Shay’s life together when they were still young and struggling.
More seriously, Ms. Haddish said she found inspiration in Mr. Morgan’s steadfast efforts to resume his career.
“Now,” Ms. Haddish said, “I got her the best doctors, and she’s getting better and better. Tracy showed me, if he can get himself together and be able to work, damn, maybe I can get my mom to that level, too.”
She added: “He’s a survivor. He’s a testament that if you really want to do something better for yourself or others, you can.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Even After 22 Trillion Digits, We’re Still No Closer To The End Of Pi”

While treating pi as equal to 3.14 is often good enough, the number really continues on forever, a seemingly random series of digits ambling infinitely outward and obeying no discernible pattern – 3.14159265358979.
To get just 10 correct digits of pi, you’d have to add about 5 billion fractions together.
As computers got faster and memory became more available, digits of pi began falling like dominoes, racing down the number’s infinite line, impossibly far but also never closer to the end.
Building off of Ramanujan’s formula, the mathematical brothers Gregory and David Chudnovsky calculated over 2 billion digits of pi in the early 1990s using a homemade supercomputer housed in a cramped and sweltering Manhattan apartment.
The current record now stands at over 22 trillion digits – thousands of times more than the Chudnovskys’ home-brewed supercomputer – worked out after 105 days of computation on a Dell server using a freely available program called y-cruncher.
Maybe 22 trillion digits is just a bit of overkill.
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory uses only 15 digits of pi for its highest-accuracy calculations for interplanetary navigation.
Sure, we’ve learned a bit of math theory while digging deep into pi: about fast Fourier transforms and that pi is probably a so-called normal number.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I downloaded all my Facebook data”

Those are just a few of the details contained in the archive of my Facebook history, which I downloaded on Monday.
My Facebook is basically a mausoleum of my 20s; a repository of old photos, status updates and conversations with people who have drifted out of my life.
Looking through your downloaded data reveals certain information you ordinarily wouldn’t see.
Facebook assigns one of two labels to what it calls your Friend Peer Group: Starting Adult Life or Established Adult Life.
Facebook doesn’t appear to classify your face into categories like Adult Face That’s Starting to Look Old but I wouldn’t put it past them.
If you haven’t downloaded your Facebook history I highly recommend doing so.
Seeing your digital life organised into folders is something of a wakeup call, particularly when you realise the data Facebook lets you download is just the tip of the iceberg of what it knows about you.
After looking through my Facebook history, I felt inspired to archive my entire digital footprint.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Break Your Phone Addiction”

Despite all these ill effects, I keep carrying and checking my phone.
Putting the phone face down or even turning it off doesn’t solve the problem.
Price’s four-week plan to change your relationship with your phone builds up to a 24-hour trial separation.
I had family activities scheduled during my 24-hour break, and in the absence of the phone, I was able to enjoy these activities without distraction.
Goodbye, social media! I’m much less likely to reach for the phone if there’s no Twitter or Facebook.
Tristan Harris, who worked at Google before co-founding the Center for Humane Technology, advocates setting your phone display to black and white, which he says is far less appealing than brightly colored icons and has helped many people reduce their phones’ appeal.
My biggest struggle with my phone is that I check it more often than is necessary, and then I feel bad afterwards.
Regardless of whether we’re truly “Addicted” to phones and other technology, many people don’t like their phone habits but find it very difficult to change them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Are Modern Debates on Morality So Shrill?”

The kind of moral system outlined above can really only function in a fairly homogeneous community of limited size; as a society grows increasingly large and diverse, people no longer share the same telos, nor a project of common good that the telos supports.
In a moral system which lacks a telos, there exist only negative proscriptions for appropriate behavior – rules which are not designed to move man to fulfill his essential purpose, but simply to allow the basic functions of society to continue.
Just how granular the rules should get is a matter of one’s perspective of what is “Just” and “Right” and these positions are based on conflicting telos, or on no defined telos at all.
The disappearance of a shared telos from a culture’s moral code ultimately has a deteriorating effect on that culture’s moral discourse.
MacIntyre truly offers an incisive explanation for why our moral debates are so shrill.
Even though modern society no longer shares a common telos, you still should be clear on your own.
Such debates can be healthy and robust when in engaged in between people who share the same telos.
When debates concern issues of “Right” and “Wrong,” if the parties do not share a common telos, the result will only be pointless, irrational pontificating.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stephen Hawking, modern cosmology’s brightest star, dies aged 76”

Stephen Hawking, the brightest star in the firmament of science, whose insights shaped modern cosmology and inspired global audiences in the millions, has died aged 76.
Hawking’s first major breakthrough came in 1970, when he and Roger Penrose applied the mathematics of black holes to the entire universe and showed that a singularity, a region of infinite curvature in spacetime, lay in our distant past: the point from which came the big bang.
Miniature black holes dot the universe, Hawking said, each as heavy as a billion tonnes, but no larger than a proton.
Hawking came round to believing the more common, if no less baffling explanation, that information is stored at the black hole’s event horizon, and encoded back into radiation as the black hole radiates.
Marika Taylor, a former student of Hawking’s and now professor of theoretical physics at Southampton University, remembers how Hawking announced his U-turn on the information paradox to his students.
Some credit must go to Hawking’s editor at Bantam, Peter Guzzardi, who took the original title: “From the Big Bang to Black Holes: A Short History of Time”, turned it around, and changed the “Short” to “Brief”.
In 1997, Hawking and Thorne bet John Preskill an encyclopaedia that information must be lost in black holes.
“What do Sheldon Cooper and a black hole have in common?” Hawking asked the fictional Caltech physicist whose IQ comfortably outstrips his social skills.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NCAA Tournament Bracket Breakdown: Your Guide to the 2018 Field”

There is literally only one reason anyone watches the NCAA tournament selection show, and that is to know what the bracket looks like as soon as possible.
I’ll play elevator music in the background as the teams are unveiled one by one at their respective spots in the bracket.
Why this hasn’t happened yet is almost as big of a mystery as the ninth-place team in the Pac-12 making the NCAA tournament over the team that finished second in the conference.
I don’t actually think any team has a cakewalk in the NCAA tournament, given that every year serves a reminder that low-seeded teams are capable of beating higher-seeded opponents.
The time has to be now for Bennett, both because he has the best team he’s ever coached and the best team in the country and because there aren’t any insurmountable juggernauts in the field for Virginia to worry about.
Most enticing potential story line: Is Collin Sexton the next Kemba Walker? It’s a March tradition unlike any other: I desperately try to find a Kemba candidate in the NCAA tournament field.
Bobby’s team is hot garbage right now and made the NCAA tournament only because it hit some 3s in a handful of games three months ago, so I don’t expect a Bobby-Dan matchup to happen.
I just need some hope to cling to, OK? If you would’ve told me in December that Young would be one game away from playing Duke in the NCAA tournament, I would have taken a three-hour ice bath to redistribute my blood back to the appropriate places in my body.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 25 Best Productivity Apps For 2018”

Whether it’s a simple word processor, a smarter to-do list, or a more efficient way to transcribe interviews, downloading some new apps can help manage your time and produce better work.
Here are some of the best productivity apps for phones, tablets, and computers that launched in the last year or got a substantial upgrade.
After seven years without proper desktop apps, the excellent board-based project management tool Trello released Mac and Windows versions last September.
The collaborative document editor added its own apps platform last year, turning it into a central hub for analytics charts, drawings, planning boards, polls, status bars, and spreadsheets.
For iPad Pro users, Notability is the best app for taking notes with an Apple Pencil, mostly because it can synchronize recorded audio with handwritten notes.
The app is also a powerful drawing and annotation tool, especially with iOS 11’s drag-and-drop and Files app integration for moving PDF files in and out.
Five years after launching as way to draw on the iPad, FiftyThree relaunched its Paper and Paste apps as collaboration tools.
Download videos from the web, silence notifications, prevent the computer from sleeping, launch multiple apps with one click, and archive files in bulk.

The orginal article.