Summary of “The 10 Best Books on Productivity and Time Management: 2018”

Here, a selection of books to help boost your productivity and improve your time-management skills.
So for this reading list on the best productivity books and books on time management, I reached out to a broad range of experts from academia, business, journalism, and tech.
Fm; Justin Kerr, author, most recently of How to Be Great at Your Job; Aishwarya Iyer, CEO and founder of Brightland; Jake Knapp, author of Make Time and Sprint; Candace Nelson, co-founder and pastry chef of Sprinkles Cupcakes and Pizzana; Robert Pozen, senior lecturer at MIT Sloan School of Management and author of Extreme Productivity; Gretchen Rubin, author and host of the podcast Happier With Gretchen Rubin; Jane Stoller, life coach and author of Organizing Your Lifestyle; Laura Vanderkam, author of several books about time management and productivity, including Off the Clock and Juliet’s School of Possibilities; and Heidi Zak, co-founder and co-CEO of ThirdLove.
These are seven of our panelists’ most-recommended titles on productivity and time management, along with a few Strategist-approved honorable mentions.
Fm, likes the way Allen’s book “Outlines three simple steps to a productivity system adaptable to anyone.” Those steps include using “a ‘collection bucket’ to store things outside your mind and stay focused and creating a ‘next actions’ list for all your projects to avoid thinking in the moment,” says Clark, who adds that his favorite quote from the book is, “Your mind is for having ideas, not holding them.” However, the advice can get a little nitty-gritty.
Though productivity books might seem like a modern phenomenon, they have a long history that can be traced all the way back to the 18th century, with the publication of Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography.
“Benjamin Franklin managed to be not only one of the Founding Fathers, but also to start a public library, discover electricity, negotiate with France, invent bifocals, and write an American classic. He’s a productivity model for all of us,” says writer and podcast host Gretchen Rubin, who notes that even though this book was written centuries ago, it’s still “Fascinating, stimulating, and also quite funny.”
It’s a good reminder that one of the best things you can do to improve your productivity is to put down your phone, turn off your notifications, and simply focus on the work that needs to get done.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Doctors Reject Tools That Make Their Jobs Easier”

Half my fellow doctors thought it weighed them down and wanted nothing to do with it.
Doctors were all for detecting fevers to guide diagnosis and treatment, but their determination of whether fever was present was qualitative.
Grimaud captured the prevailing view of the time when he argued that the physician’s touch captured information richer than any tool, and for over a hundred years doctors were loath to use the glass tube.
The thermometer’s takeover has hardly done away with our use for doctors.
Still, the same debate about technology replacing doctors rages on.
Some doctors celebrate this millimeter and microliter resolution inside patients’ bodies.
The Philadelphia hospital accepted the computer-based list of worrisome fevers, but then deployed their best doctors and nurses to apply Grimaud’s “Highly practiced touch” and look over the children before declaring the infection was deadly and bringing them into the hospital for intravenous medications.
Too many doctors have resigned that they have nothing to add in a world of advanced technology.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emotional resilience in the workplace”

Inward-facing EQ. Emotional intelligence encompasses more than navigating social interactions.
These inward dimensions of EQ, self-awareness, and emotional discipline can seed professional success.
Yes, emotional awareness/emotional discipline are parts of EQ. For instance, if you tend to feel annoyed or angered by a colleague or your boss, it is important to label the feeling, to understand the triggers for this emotion, and how to manage it when engaging with this individual.
Emotional intelligence means understanding people, including ourselves.
Orbé-Austin explains: “To be emotionally disciplined means to recognize how to handle different emotions at certain times. For instance, if you are receiving critical feedback, while it may be upsetting, it is important to know that it may not serve you well to respond in an angry manner. Emotional discipline allows you to respond appropriately to the expectations of the setting and the audience, to make the impression you wish to make.”
Enacting emotional discipline is a practiced skill, and it can be especially helpful for leaders.
Orbé-Austin points out, “As a leader, part of emotional discipline is to model suitable behavior. For instance, during a crisis, your team may not want you to appear overwhelmed or out of control. You might talk about the challenges and some of your concerns, but it may need to be in a measured way, which provides confidence and hope to your team.”
Perhaps Rivera’s emotional discipline is the best attribute any professional can have.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The problem with “shop local,” explained by Jeremiah Moss”

In the ’90s, the stretch of Bleecker Street that snakes north through New York City’s Greenwich Village was home to dozens of independently owned bookshops, sex shops, antique stores, and framing galleries.
Throughout New York City’s transition from a place where a middle-class person could maybe make a living opening and running a business to a place where, well, good luck with that, there’s been one person chronicling it all: Jeremiah Moss.
Moss is the author of the blog Vanishing New York, where since 2007 he’s been lamenting the death of mom-and-pop stores all over the city and engaging in activism to try to save them.
Moss has been a staunch critic of this trend, which is certainly not limited to New York City.
I spoke with Moss over the phone about his piece, in which he criticizes the neoliberalism – the free-market, capitalist approach to governance – that permeated in New York in response to the city’s financial crisis in the late ’70s and ultimately spread globally.
Neoliberal ideas around privatization or regulation – running the government like a corporation, austerity for the working classes – those ideas had been floating around, but they didn’t have any success until the fiscal crisis in New York City of the 1970s.
So if running cities like corporations is contributing to the demise of small businesses and turning citizens into consumers, why are these ideas still so popular?
People, particularly younger people and retired people, it seems, want to be in the city.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Science of Sibling Rivalry”

When a sibling relationship is bad it can be really bad-as in messing-up-your-life bad. Tense sibling relationships make people more likely to use substances and to be depressed and anxious in adolescence.
Sibling bullying makes a kid more likely to engage in self-harm as a teen and to become psychotic by age 18.
Whether a person models herself after her siblings or tries to distinguish herself has particularly important consequences.
One study found that siblings who felt positively about each other tended to achieve similar education levels, while those who spent unequal time with their dad and perceived unequal parental treatment had diverging educational fortunes.
Emulating your sibling can be a mistake, depending on what she’s up to: Girls are more likely to get pregnant in their teens and teenagers are more likely to engage in risky behavior if an older sibling did so first.
A study of more than 1 million Swedes found that one’s risk of dying of a heart attack spikes after a sibling dies of one, due not only to shared DNA but also to the stress of losing such a key figure.
Siblings seem like they’re just there only until they aren’t.
This article appears in the November 2018 print edition with the headline “The Science of Sibling Rivalry.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “We can now customize cancer cures, tumor by tumor”

The first time someone pitched Genentech’s senior leadership on a personalized cancer vaccine, it did not go well.
Another company, Neon Therapeutics, founded by researchers at Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Washington University, treated its first patient in phase 1 trials in May with a similar vaccine derived using a different method.
The technology for the first truly personalized cancer vaccine is not yet proven.
As far back as the 1940s, some researchers were arguing that it might be possible to put the immune system’s cellular bloodhounds onto the scent of a specific tumor by somehow priming them with a vaccine that helped it recognize the tumor’s mutations.
The scientific tools simply didn’t exist to take the sophisticated personalized approach Genentech is now pursuing-an approach that requires scientists to fully characterize an individual cancer tumor, identify the most attackable mutations, and then design a personalized vaccine that would provoke the immune system to target them.
It was concrete evidence suggesting that genome sequencing could be used to design an effective cancer vaccine capable of putting the immune system on the trail of multiple mutations at the same time-and that such a vaccine might indeed provoke the immune system to attack a tumor.
Together, these findings were what helped her and Mellman convince Genentech’s review committee that a cancer vaccine was worth pursuing.
Producing the vaccines even for the small number of patients in early trials “Was an extremely challenging process,” says BioNTech CEO Ugur Sahin, a veteran cancer researcher who cofounded the company in 2008.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat’ Is a Love Letter to Amateur Cooks”

For much of that time, the 38-year-old Nosrat has paired her love of cooking with an affinity for the written word.
The warmly written, pragmatic text begins its first formal section-“Salt”-with an anecdote from the Iranian American chef’s childhood in California, where frequent family trips to the Pacific Ocean shaped Nosrat’s understanding of salt as an element closely associated with the beach.
Rather than inundate aspiring cooks with an index of glamorously photographed recipes to follow precisely, Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat offers Nosrat’s readers something much more substantial: a cooking philosophy.
Now Nosrat is expanding her approach-not to cooking, but to reaching a new set of would-be amateur culinarians.
“Fat: It’s nothing short of a miracle. Fat is flavor. Fat is texture,” Nosrat says in a voice-over at the beginning of the first episode.
Having spent years in Italy following her introduction to cooking, Nosrat explains what drove her choice to return to the country for the series: “As I cooked and ate my way throughout the country, one thing became clear,” she says in the episode.
In the third episode, “Acid,” Doña Conchi, la abuela, teaches Nosrat how the Yucatán Peninsula’s sour oranges, salsas, and uniquely acidic Mayan honey utilize acid to create vibrant dishes, as well as the widely adapted method of escabeche.
“There are only so many ways to cook, there are only so many ways to make food taste good,” Nosrat said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Rent the Runway Wants to Lend You Your Look”

Hyman founded Rent the Runway in 2008 with Jenny Fleiss, while both were in their second year at Harvard Business School.
At a focus group held in Washington, D.C., Hyman spoke with a customer who compared Rent the Runway to an ice-cream sundae.
In 2016, Hyman and Fleiss launched Rent the Runway Unlimited, a subscription service that initially aimed to help professional women dress for work, and has since expanded to cover most of their daily fashion concerns.
Rent the Runway has some ten million members-defined by the company as people who have created a log-in to its site-spread across the country.
Unlike most warehouse-based retailers, such as Amazon, which care primarily about getting goods to customers, Rent the Runway must also see that goods get returned from them-and in time to reach the next person waiting in line.
Hyman told me, “I was, like, Oh! Our business is about an incremental ten compliments.” Until last year, Rent the Runway had never run a formal advertising campaign.
One of them, who calculates that she has rented a hundred and twenty-six items since February, described herself as a “Walking billboard” for Rent the Runway.
Rent the Runway is hardly the only company using data analytics to offer affordable personalized shopping.

The orginal article.

Summary of “9 Words and Phrases You’re Probably Using Wrong”

Here, excerpted from our new book, That Doesn’t Mean What You Think It Means, are nine terms or words that sound smart but when used incorrectly make you sound the opposite, along with real examples of their being misused, drawn from business news reports, research publications, and corporate press releases.
In spite of popular thought, “Begs the question” is not a smart-sounding way of saying “Raises the question.” It’s actually a formal logic term that means trying to prove something based on a premise that itself needs to be proved.
In a 2015 American Heritage Dictionary survey of language experts, 79% disapproved of using “Impacts on” to mean “Affect.” Another 39% disapproved of using “Impact” to mean “Affect” even without that preposition “On.” The original meaning of “Impact” involves collisions.
You can use it to mean “To affect”.
What we’re saying is that the meaning of moot is “Open to debate” – which is the time-honored definition of moot.
So sometimes moot is used to mean “Definitely not debatable” because the point is so immaterial.
The problem is, in nonstatistical use, significant means something noteworthy or important.
Unique means being the “Only one of its kind; unlike anything else.” So something can’t be the “Most unique” – it can only be unique.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sneaky subscriptions are plaguing the App Store – TechCrunch”

Today, the majority of the Top Grossing apps on Apple’s App Store are streaming services, dating sites, entertainment apps or games.
This raises the question as to whether some app developers are trying to scam App Store users by way of subscriptions.
Scanner App – This No. 69 Top Grossing app is raking in a whopping $14.3 million per year for its document scanning utility, according to Sensor Tower data.
Legitimate developers have complained about this app for months, but Apple even featured it on its big screen at WWDC. *After speaking to Apple about this app, Weather Alarms was removed from the App Store over the weekend.
The app is also super aggressive about pushing its subscriptions.
The issue of scam apps may not always be the failure of App Store review.
In the App Store itself, you can navigate to subscriptions in fewer taps, but it’s not obvious how.
“The App Store has always been a great place, overseen and curated by highly intelligent and ethical people. I believe the App Store can stay as it always has been, if the right measures are taken to deal with those developers who trick the system,” Zhadanov adds.

The orginal article.