Summary of “9 CEOs Share Their Favorite Productivity Hacks”

A study published in Harvard Business Review found that each week CEOs work an average of 62.5 hours and attend 37 meetings.
Moskovitz wants managers to be makers some of the time, so NMW ensures they get some flow time, too, he said.
“At the rate at which StockX is growing, it’s a 24-hour job and I spend 70 to 80 percent of my time on the road across varying time zones, which can be hard on your body. I take 11-minute naps once or twice per day and find that it makes for increased energy and efficiency.”
Katia Beauchamp, cofounder of Birchbox, says one of her best productivity tricks is something simple: She insists that her team includes a deadline in their email.
“Having fewer things to do is the best way to get things done. I’m very careful with my time and attention-it’s my most precious resource. If you don’t have that, you can’t do what you want to do. And if you can’t do what you want to do, what’s the point?”.
“The way to solve this is allow free flow of information between all levels. If, in order to get something done between depts, an individual contributor has to talk to their manager, who talks to a director, who talks to a VP, who talks to another VP, who talks to a director, who talks to a manager, who talks to someone doing the actual work, then super dumb things will happen. It must be ok for people to talk directly and just make the right thing happen.”
LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner sends fewer emails to receive fewer emails.
“If you have a list of 20 things to do, you end up realizing, ‘I don’t need to do 20 things,'” Chesky said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dividing Your Assets in a Gray Divorce”

With gray divorce on the rise-the divorce rate for adults over 50 has doubled since the 1990s, according to the Pew Research Center-both partners need to understand how to correctly split up retirement plans and other assets.
You need to follow specific rules for dividing 401(k) plans and IRAs, or one partner could take an unnecessary financial hit or face an unexpected tax bill.
Increasingly, divorcing clients own annuities, which are challenging to divide, says Jeff Kostis, president of JK Financial Planning, in Chicago, and a divorce financial planner.
You’ll also need to accept that retirement plans are among the assets you’ll need to divide.
Partners who hold retirement plans don’t always understand this, says Peggy Tracy, owner of Priority Planning, a tax preparation and financial services practice, in Wheaton, Ill. “They’re shocked they have to share it,” she says.
Some couples are tempted to simply split plans themselves.
Planners usually separate Roth IRAs from other retirement assets and split them in half, says Tracy.
Find a divorce financial analyst through the Institute for Divorce Financial Analysts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Toys Are Taking Vacations and Seeing the World”

Azuma grew up, but as she got older, she rediscovered a passion for soft toys.
Azuma isn’t alone-lots of adults make toys a centerpiece of their travel dispatches.
She then identified some common trends, such as the desire to “Accumulate travel culture capital” by sharing pics of toys posed in world tourism hotspots.
Something about pictures of toys by famous world landmarks makes a certain breed of traveler feel particularly worldly-the familiar and the foreign together, as if it is the most natural thing in the world.
Clients ship their toys to Azuma, and they stay with her for two or three weeks, during which time their adventures are promptly reported back to their owners via social media posts.
“From poses to accompanying captions, there was a clear trend of toys appearing to experience travel. The toys were photographed worried about missing public transport, deciding on their next meal and, of course, posing in front of famous tourist sites,” she explains.
Traveling toys are often pictured engaging in human activities, instead of just seeing the sites.
In addition to the agencies in Japan and France, there is now Toy Voyagers, a website that connects traveling toys with hosts, and Omanimali, a toy-passport-issuing organization based in Germany.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These Architects Are Using Video Games to Rethink Modern Living”

Tasked with designing something without precedent, principal landscape architect David Fletcher, 50, approached the design like he does most projects now: by using video-game development software.
Fletcher’s preference for designing in a game engine, as the software is called, was cultivated two years ago when he worked on “The Witness,” an “Open world” role-playing video game.
The opportunity to design the landscape for “The Witness” was a dream come true for Fletcher, who’s played video games since childhood.
The video game “The Witness” takes place on this island, which was designed over the course of several years by a team of architects, including David Fletcher.
The architects were able to experience the park from their office computers by walking through their virtual designs and judging from the ground whether they worked or not.
“We don’t design two-dimensionally; we always design three-dimensionally,” he says.
Fletcher made a rare choice, but how rare is hard to say; neither video game companies nor professional organizations like the American Institute of Architects keep records of how many architects have similar experiences to Fletcher.
“It’s more of a design tool.” Similar to the blank slate Fletcher faced as he began designing “The Witness,” Minecraft gives players a blank slate every time they decide to build something new, which works for Delaney, who has always loved building things.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Made One Simple Financial Change and It Lowered My Spending”

The idea is to increase the pain of paying, especially with a credit card, by forcing myself to take note of what I’m spending.
Looking back at my bank-account statements from the past few years, I can see that my monthly discretionary spending dropped somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the five months after I introduced this system.
Perhaps the more definitive success of my system is the fact that, even as I have begun to earn more money, my monthly spending has remained more or less the same-a fact that I attribute in part to the increased clarity of my cash flow.
“Making a list of spending is very useful,” he told me, and said I’d successfully devised a way to increase my pain of paying.
Another thing to consider when making spending decisions, Ariely says, is what one could be buying instead with the same money.
The conventional way of thinking about budgeting, he says, usually “Puts a lot of blame on people when they’re spending money on things that give them pleasure. There’s a sort of puritanical aspect, like, I caught this person going to Starbucks.” He continued, “I think the real goal of budgeting is to make sure that you’re spending your money on the things that are the most valuable and enjoyable for you.” He also made the point Loewenstein did about “Big-ticket items,” but said he thinks my system is a good way to make sure someone’s nonessential spending goes toward things they enjoy.
Hearing all this feedback about my personal-finance system made me a bit discouraged about the dynamics that shape spending.
What would create such a culture? There is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which provides high-level government oversight, and there are small individual actions, but there isn’t something in between-a powerful advocacy group, a mainstream cultural movement, or something else not yet built or imagined-that serves as a counterweight to the pressure on Americans to spend.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Quanta Magazine”

They’re creating a single mathematical model that unites years of biological experiments and explains how the brain produces elaborate visual reproductions of the world based on scant visual information.
They’ve explained how neurons in the visual cortex interact to detect the edges of objects and changes in contrast, and now they’re working on explaining how the brain perceives the direction in which objects are moving.
Previous efforts to model human vision made wishful assumptions about the architecture of the visual cortex.
The retina is connected to the visual cortex, the part of the brain in the back of the head. However, there’s very little connectivity between the retina and the visual cortex.
For a visual area roughly one-quarter the size of a full moon, there are only about 10 nerve cells connecting the retina to the visual cortex.
LGN cells send a pulse to the visual cortex when they detect a change from dark to light, or vice versa, in their tiny section of the visual field.
For every 10 LGN neurons that snake back from the retina, there are 4,000 neurons in just the initial “Input layer” of the visual cortex – and many more in the rest of it.
All previous efforts assumed that more information travels between the retina and the cortex – an assumption that would make the visual cortex’s response to stimuli easier to explain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s a Dark Side to Meditation That No One Talks About”

We’ve all heard about the benefits of meditation ad nauseam.
In addition to calming the mind and body, meditation can also reduce the markers of stress in people with anxiety disorders.
This demanding and sometimes intensely distressing side of meditation is rarely mentioned in scientific literature, says Jared Lindahl, a visiting professor of religious studies at Brown University, who has an interest in neuroscience and Buddhism.
Along with Willoughby Britton, a psychologist and assistant professor of psychiatry at Brown, the two meditators have co-authored a study that documents and creates a taxonomy for the variant phenomenology of meditation.
To conduct their research, the pair interviewed 60 Western Buddhist meditation practitioners who had all experienced challenging issues during their practice.
They included both rookies and meditation teachers, many of whom had accumulated more than 10,000 hours of meditation experience in their lifetime.
Most would not imagine that these side-effects could be hiding behind the lotus-print curtains of your local meditation center.
Who runs into the unexpected hurdles? What are the unique set of factors involved? In which ways do teachers assist students who are struggling? The answers, which still require future research, may one day be relevant to the ways meditation is used as therapy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Separates Champions from ‘Almost Champions’?”

Whereas super champions were playing in premiere leagues and/or competing on national teams, almost champions had achieved well at the youth level but were playing in less prestigious leagues as adults.
The researchers found that super champions were characterized by an almost fanatical reaction to challenge.
Almost champions also loved the thrill of competition, but they remembered having an aversion toward practice and at times felt forced to pursue their respective sport.
As one almost champion put it: “I loved fighting, but the training was just a chore.
Almost champions were focused on external benchmarks, like national rankings or how they compared to rivals, a mind-set the researchers speculate explains why almost champions got discouraged during rough patches.
The parents of almost champions were an ever-present factor, hovering over their every move.
“My parents, my dad especially, was always there, shouting instructions from the touchline, pushing me to practice at home,” remembers an almost champion.
” No surprise that almost champions changed coaches frequently whereas super champions maintained long-term relationships.

The orginal article.

Summary of “On Getting Rejected a Lot”

You can be the most talented photographer, the most brilliant scientist, or the most diligent activist, and most things still won’t work out.
The more successful they are, the more rejections they’ve had-because they’re putting themselves out there, taking risks, and still moving forward.
Want a job as a trekking guide in Iceland, which would involve travel and the chance for gorgeous photos? You might as well apply, because it probably won’t work out! Want an internship with the UN or an artist’s residency in Antarctica? It probably won’t happen, but give it a go!
Spend a few hours a week looking for opportunities that would literally change your life: Jobs around the world.
Don’t spam editors or be sloppy, and respect the norms of the industry by, for example, always disclosing simultaneous submissions; you don’t want things to backfire if you do get the go-ahead. But give yourself a goal number of rejections.
If you interview for a job you’re obsessed with, figure out what it is that appeals so much.
Maybe you didn’t realize how badly you wanted to live in Montana until you got rejected from a job in Montana.
That’s how you figure out what you really want.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tracking Down the $7.6 Million Teardrop Talbot-Lago”

Joe lives in a development a few miles west of the $15 million mansions lining the sea, on the workaday side of the Intracoastal Waterway.
Joe worked with his heirs to gain part ownership and traveled the U. S., interviewing past owners and authorities and tracking the car’s provenance.
Calling Joe a “South Florida hustler and con man,” they said they had only received $150,000 apiece from the sale of the Ferrari, while Joe took $2.4 million.
For two years, Joe went to work crafting a history of the Teardrop.
Somehow the stolen Teardrop had ended up in the hands of Joe’s friend turned enemy, who had sold it for more than $7 million to the novice collector.
Motor-­vehicle authorities contacted the Milwaukee police, who called Mueller-its rightful owner-and the FBI. Mueller, who was then working with Joe to find the car, demanded the return of the Teardrop.
After his arrest, he became cooperative, giving them the motor as well as his computers and files, which contained information tying him to what Joe believes is a $60 million network of international car thieves-all run by his former friend.
“I’ve been coming here for years,” Joe says, sucking down an oyster.

The orginal article.