Summary of “‘Want to see the Lincoln bedroom?’: Trump relishes role as White House tour guide”

In a visit in 2017, Trump told a TV anchor, “I’m told this is where Bill and Monica. . .” – stopping himself from going further, according to “Team of Vipers,” a new book by former White House aide Cliff Sims that The Washington Post obtained before its publication Tuesday.
Three other people who have embarked on a tour with Trump said he made similar comments regarding the former president and the White House intern, laughing and making facial expressions.
Often spending days ensconced in the presidential residence, Trump relishes giving tours to acquaintances and strangers by the hundreds, bragging all the while about improving it while he lives there, according to nearly a dozen visitors and current and former White House aides, most of whom spoke on the condition of anonymity to reveal details of the private events.
During the 35 days that the government was partly shut down over his demand for border wall funding, Trump gave some visitors looks inside the West Wing, White House aides said.
White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said of the tours: “The president is proud of the White House and its rich history.”
The former Obama aide said the 44th president often had friends, family of staff members and others for White House visits, contrary to what Trump tells people on tours.
Trump often has groused about flies in the White House and has told groups that his aides have mixed luck killing them.
Trump also has bragged during some visits about the pictures of him on the walls of the West Wing – including one with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and another of his inauguration – and how photos of him get framed and hung quickly by White House staff members when he asks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can we ditch intensive farming”

Intensive farming has already had a huge effect on biodiversity and the environment worldwide.
The most obvious alternative to industrialised intensive farming in the developed world is organic farming.
Rob Percival, head of policy at the Soil Association, says organic farming can feed the world, if consumption patterns are adjusted to encourage those who can afford meat to eat less of it.
For many farmers, the investment and time needed to meet organic standards may be a stretch, but there are ways to move towards more sustainable farming without organic certification.
Agroecology is the name given to a broad range of farming techniques that seek to minimise the environmental impact of farming.
Urban farming can deliver food – or at least some fresh produce – efficiently to dense populations without the greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient loss associated with transporting it across long distances.
Already, urban farming produces about a fifth of the world’s food.
Our reliance on artificial fertiliser and intensive farming techniques did not happen overnight, but took decades.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bite-sized: 50 great short stories, chosen by Hilary Mantel, George Saunders and more”

It is a much deeper and more biblical story than that and, like any great work of art, resists reduction.
A wonderful sampling of her stories is available in Women in Their Beds: New & Selected Stories.
Among the handful of short stories closest to my heart, I’ve chosen “The Love of a Good Woman” by Canadian writer Munro, from her 1998 collection of that name.
William Trevor has influenced me more than any other writer, and it’s impossible for me to name one story by him that is an absolute favourite.
Key to a great short story is the tension and torsion created within each sentence.
Before her wedding day, as Machado expertly builds the atmosphere of foreboding, the narrator notes that, “Brides never fare well in stories. Stories can sense happiness and snuff it out like a candle”.
Maupassant, probably the only short-story writer as influential as Chekhov, wrote in two modes: short, impressively constructed but one-dimensional stories with trick endings, and longer, more interesting work.
Narayan, who wrote more than 200 short stories, called them “Concentrated miniatures of human experience in all its opulence”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hollywood Stars Didn’t Pay 90 Percent Tax; They Created Loopholes”

SHARE THIS ARTICLE. After Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez raised the idea of a marginal tax rate of 70 percent on income over $10 million, the progressive wing of the Twittersphere began pointing out that in the 1950s and early 1960s , the top marginal tax rate was over 90 percent.
According to records compiled by the Tax Foundation, a single person making $16,000 in 1955 – that’s $150,000 in today’s dollars – had a marginal tax rate of 50 percent; compensation of $50,000 moved you into the 75 percent tax bracket; and an income of $200,000 put you in the 91 percent tax bracket.
They found – or created – enough loopholes that, according to the Congressional Research Service, the top 0.01 percent in the 1950s paid not 90 percent but closer to 45 percent of their income in taxes.
Prior to the Tax Reform Act of 1986, the tax code was full of loopholes that individuals could take advantage of.
As one oil expert put it at the time, “If you are in the 90 percent tax bracket, you are risking only 10 cents on the dollar spent on unsuccessful ventures.” In effect, Hollywood was providing the capital oilmen needed to drill wells.
The collapsible corporation was the other tax loophole Hollywood stars relied on.
Why? Because the corporate tax rate was around 50 percent rather than 90 percent.
Some stars would sell stock in their corporation to the movie company, so they could take their fee in the form of capital gains, which had a maximum tax rate of only 25 percent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside 37-year-old pitcher Luke Hagerty’s improbable comeback story”

EVERY DAY, LUKE Hagerty woke up and said the same thing: “I’m going to be fine.” This was all a bad dream.
A gangly teenager who came in to train named Austin Davis would throw the ball to Hagerty, and Hagerty would throw it to him, and it didn’t exactly seem natural to Hagerty, but it wasn’t foreign, either.
Dylan Rheault, a minor league pitcher who a couple days earlier hit 98 mph during a workout, texted that Hagerty needed to eat eggs and potatoes.
Only four left-handed relievers in baseball last year threw a harder average fastball than Hagerty offered Jan. 13.
The Chicago Cubs wanted to sign Luke Hagerty again, 16½ years after the first time.
Inside his facility, amid the solitude, Hagerty had built one of the most talented raw left arms in the world.
What the Cubs did for Hancock – giving him his first major league opportunity at 27 years old – they could do for Hagerty.
DURING THE MORNING portion of a daylong physical, a doctor studied Hagerty’s chart, then Hagerty himself, then the chart again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Unlock Your Team’s Creativity”

If a team is creatively blocked, a first step for leadership is to examine whether the processes that surround people are holding them hostage in their thinking.
Reveal “Sticky floors.” Everyone possesses the foundation to become creative, which starts with team members believing in themselves as idea generators who have the ability to become a compelling voice for creative concepts.
As a leader, part of your role in managing teams is to use emotional intelligence to determine whether any team members are unknowingly holding themselves back from tapping into their talents and full potential.
If even one person hides their creative light under a bushel, the whole team suffers.
Take a proactive approach to address this issue: help the team member become aware of the sticky floor, and offer coaching and support around expressing innovative ideas within the team setting.
As part of coaching team members off of their sticky floors, it’s key to help them understand how to develop a growth mindset.
When encountering a sticky floor related to creativity, leaders should coach team members, explaining how the internal belief that they can become more creative helps them continue to develop their skills over time, learning from their mistakes and making improvements.
The goal of getting your team to think beyond the box is a no-brainer, but figuring out how to actually achieve greater group innovation isn’t.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Boy bullied for Irish dance meets NFL player who trains in Irish dance”

Carl Tubbs, 13, of Des Moines started Irish dancing after his sister, Julia, got involved years ago.
What happened to Carl over the next year unfolds like a new-age fairy tale: His mother, Joanne Tubbs, distraught that the boy who loved the clicks and stomps of Irish dance was giving it up completely, found a video of an NFL player studying Irish dance.
Carl’s introduction to Irish dance was as a trailing sibling running around the dance studio room while his older sister Julia, now 17, practiced.
Carl became so entranced with Irish dance that he daydreamed about it constantly, a little avatar performing jigs in his mind.
Schulte, Carl’s dance teacher, suggested Tubbs google “Alex Collins.” A video popped up of this gigantic running back lined up among teenage girls learning to Irish dance.
Turns out Collins had started taking Irish dancing lessons to “Fine tune his footwork, timing and stamina,” he told ESPN in 2017.Tubbs took to Twitter and typed out a note to Collins: “Any advice for a 12yr old boy getting bullied for taking Irish dance lessons? Maybe a shout out to dancer Carl from you would help.”
Budda03 Any advice for a 12yr old boy getting bullied for taking Irish dance lessons?Maybe a shoutout to dancer Carl from you would help?
One dancer, who would go on to win the Irish dancing world championships six times, told Carl that classmates used to wait outside his studio and throw rocks at him as he walked home.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Resort Skiing Is Dangerous. And It Always Will Be.”

On January 17, a catastrophic inbounds avalanche released in open terrain on the K3 Chute of Taos Ski Valley’s 12,481-foot Kachina Peak.
Avalanches are an inherent risk of resort skiing and snowboarding.
Spatial variability is the number one reason why avalanches are inherent to ski areas.
Avalanche forecasters like to say that such layers are “Guilty until proven innocent,” and ski resorts spend tens of thousands of dollars each winter testing such deep instabilities with explosives.
I’ve witnessed inbounds avalanches that have carried skiers over cliffs and inspected firsthand the evidence of other massive inbounds slides.
As with collisions with other skiers, slips from chairlifts, and falls from cliffs, avalanches are considered an inherent risk to resort skiing and snowboarding.
Given the law, the case-law precedent, the nature of avalanches, and the fact that Taos Ski Valley has a reputation for diligent and extremely cautious avalanche-mitigation work and terrain opening, the bar for negligence in any court proceedings will be set pretty high.
While between 1951 and 1979, roughly 10 percent of all U.S. avalanche deaths occurred inbounds, by 1994 that inbounds number had dropped to 1.3 percent-which, even though it reflects the growth of backcountry skiing and snowmobiling, is still a sizable drop and hints at the adoption of avalanche mitigation across the resort industry.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a Freak Accident Happened at Schlitterbahn Kansas City”

On vacation from Lincoln, Nebraska, with her friend Melanie Gocke and her friend’s family in August 2016, Sanford, then a rising high school junior, didn’t know anything about Schlitterbahn Kansas City.
The only thing Sanford, a self-proclaimed adrenaline junkie, did know on this summer road trip was that Schlitterbahn Kansas City had an attraction no other water park could claim: the Verrückt, the tallest waterslide in the world.
In March 2018, a forty-seven-page indictment from a grand jury in Wyandotte County revealed, among other things, whistle-blower evidence of how Schlitterbahn officials allegedly covered up other safety-related incidents on Verrückt, and concluded that the slide’s lack of safety standards “Posed a substantial and unjustifiable risk of death or severe bodily harm.” While it isn’t unique for amusement parks to get sued for isolated incidents, the magnitude of the Schwab tragedy, and Schlitterbahn’s decorated profile, made the grand jury’s findings of the water park’s negligence that much more damning.
Citing the pending litigation, Schlitterbahn was unable to give responses to dozens of questions provided by Esquire regarding the company, Henry, the Kansas City water park, Verrückt, its safety procedures, and other topics.
“The park had a lot of promise, but also a lot of issues,” said an industry veteran who has developed water-park rides throughout the world, including with Henry and Schooley at Schlitterbahn Kansas City.
The lifeguard, who spent four summers at Schlitterbahn Kansas City between 2011 and 2014, recounted an unstable work environment where misbehaving, immature, and inexperienced employees were kept on to fill the park’s lifeguard quota, while adequate water and bathroom breaks were not always a given in the stifling summer days.
In April, EPR Properties, a Kansas real estate investment trust that holds the mortgage on Schlitterbahn Kansas City, warned investors that the criminal indictments might hurt the company’s chances of paying back the $174.3 million on its loan.
“We don’t have any news so far about our Kansas City park at the time,” Prosapio told the Kansas City Star.In plot A373 under a shady tree at Pleasant Valley Cemetery, fresh flowers, a pinwheel, and a worn Kansas City Royals flag waves next to a headstone featuring Caleb Schwab’s smiling face.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bill Gates Made These 15 Predictions Back in 1999”

In the book, Gates made 15 bold predictions that at the time might have sounded outrageous.
Here are the 15 predictions Gates made just about 20 years ago – and how close they’ve come to being true.
Gates’ prediction: “Automated price comparison services will be developed, allowing people to see prices across multiple websites, making it effortless to find the cheapest product for all industries.”
Gates’ prediction: “People will carry around small devices that allow them to constantly stay in touch and do electronic business from wherever they are. They will be able to check the news, see flights they have booked, get information from financial markets, and do just about anything else on these devices.”
Gates’ prediction: “Private websites for your friends and family will be common, allowing you to chat and plan for events.”
What we see now: Just look at the ads you see on Facebook or Google – the online advertising industry hinges on the ability of these services to target ads that are, in theory, personalized to your demographic and interests.
Gates’ prediction: “Project managers looking to put a team together will be able to go online, describe the project, and receive recommendations for available people who would fit their requirements.”
Gates’ prediction: “Similarly, people looking for work will be able to find employment opportunities online by declaring their interest, needs, and specialized skills.”

The orginal article.