Summary of “How Apple Plans to Root Out Bugs, Revamp iPhone Software”

Apple’s annual software upgrade this fall will offer users plenty of new features: enabling a single set of apps to work across iPhones, iPads and Macs, a Digital Health tool to show parents how much time their children have been staring at their screen and improvements to Animojis, those cartoon characters controlled by the iPhone X’s facial recognition sensor.
Just as important this year will be what Apple doesn’t introduce: redesigned home screens for the iPhone, iPad and CarPlay, and a revamped Photos app that can suggest which images to view.
“This change is Apple beginning to realize that schedules are not being hit, stuff is being released with bugs – which previously would not have happened,” when Apple was a smaller company with fewer engineers, customers and devices to manage, says one person familiar with the company.
The shift is an admission of what many customers have already come to notice: Some Apple software has become prone to bugs and underdeveloped features.
At Apple, all new features are tied to a big release in the fall, when Apple rolls out its splashiest new software, and a more modest update in the spring.
Under the previous system, a person familiar with Apple says, “Inevitably, some things will be late because you underestimated how long it would take. Some things have to be cut, some things have to be rushed. It’s the result of having thousands of people working on the same schedule.”
The first test of the new development strategy will come in the fall, when Apple debuts the next iPhone and iPad software upgrade.
Apple plans to integrate Animojis into FaceTime, letting people put virtual faces over themselves in video calls.

The orginal article.