Summary of “How Michael Jackson’s tilt move defied gravity”

There’s one move that stunned the watching world: the gravity-defying tilt he debuted in his 1988 music video for “Smooth Criminal.” In one scene, Jackson and a few of his dancers lean forward 45 degrees, backs straight, feet flat upon the floor, and hold the pose until they return upright with little apparent effort.
Fascinated by Jackson and his seemingly inhuman abilities, Yagnick and Tripathi began to investigate just how the pop legend was able to accomplish his feat.
Along with another colleague, Dr. Sandeep Mohindra, they published their observations from a neurosurgeon’s point of view on Tuesday in the Journal of Neurosurgery: “How did Michael Jackson challenge our understanding of spine biomechanics?”.
“Very inventive idea of him,” Tripathi said with a laugh, “Because even with that shoe, I am not able to do 45 degrees. You need a very good core of strength, and that strength was in Michael Jackson and his Achilles tendon.”
Many audiences who watched Jackson and his dancers perform the feat on video and in concerts had no knowledge of the trick.
“When Michael Jackson brought out the video and then did it live on stages around the world, people didn’t know he had this shoe system,” he said.
“Particularly in India, where Michael Jackson is very popular, many people tried to copy him, and some even hurt themselves.”
Studies on the newer forms of dance inspired by Jackson back up the doctors’ observations.

The orginal article.