Summary of “Queens of Infamy: Anne Boleyn”

From the notorious to the half-forgotten, Queens of Infamy, a Longreads series by Anne Thériault, focuses on badass world-historical women of centuries past.
Finally, I respect a good hustle, and Anne’s hustle was iconic – my god, how she hustled! Even if you think Anne Boleyn was a king-seducing homewrecker extraordinaire, it’s impossible not to appreciate the sheer audacity of it all.
Even if you think Anne Boleyn was a king-seducing homewrecker extraordinaire, it’s impossible not to appreciate the sheer audacity of it all.
On the one hand, the fact that Thomas Boleyn chose Anne to be the daughter brought up in the Burgundian court indicates that she was older.
While Mary Boleyn and Henry VIII were making googly eyes at each other, Anne had her own blossoming court romance.
It wasn’t so much that Anne wasn’t wealthy or titled enough for the Percys, or that Percy was already engaged to someone else, or that Henry VIII was wildly jealous; the main problem was that Percy and Anne had taken something that was supposed to be a public business contract between two families and turned it into a private love-fest.
Every opportunity Thomas Boleyn had secured for her was to serve the goal of her marrying well; to marry beneath her station or not marry at all would mean that Anne had failed to make good on her family’s extensive investment in her.
Not long after Anne’s miscarriage, the king began to say that he had been tricked into marrying Anne by her use of “Sortilege,” a French word for sorcery.

The orginal article.