Summary of “Calories and macros and BMI don’t count. Here are the numbers that really matter.”

What’s your blood-sugar level? How many calories are you eating? And are you getting the right percentage of macros? The problem is that sometimes we track, count and obsess over numbers that don’t matter very much for our overall health.
If you have diabetes, lifestyle changes can actually help you reverse the diagnosis – but first you need to know your number.
Size 8: Too many people have a diet goal to be a specific size, but the numbers on clothes are inconsistent and arbitrary.
You don’t need to count every calorie you eat – it’s tedious, often flawed, and it doesn’t help you choose nutrient-dense foods.
If you had the choice between 100 calories of broccoli or fries, you’d probably choose the fries, right? But that wouldn’t provide much nourishment and oversimplifies eating into one silly number.
If you are a lifelong calorie counter, there’s no need to give it up, but remember that it’s not the most vital number for your overall health.
Keeping track of macros is a popular diet, and if it works for you, fantastic! But some dietitians warn that it’s difficult to know the precise macro content of every food you eat, which leads to obsessive use of food diaries and macro-counting apps.
BMI doesn’t take age, gender or bone structure into account, and athletes are often classified as overweight because BMI doesn’t distinguish between muscle and fat! So, don’t rely on this number as your primary measure of health.

The orginal article.