Summary of “3 Women on Being the Caregiver of a Disabled Sibling”

More American women than you think are currently waiting for their parents to die – knowing when that happens, they will end up caring for their disabled siblings.
Their childhoods are a dress rehearsal for this inevitability: Research shows that in these families, starting in early childhood, sisters are much more likely than their brothers to help parents care for developmentally disabled children – for example, helping to dress or feed their siblings.
Once disabled children graduate from high school and age out of federally mandated special-education services, which expire at age 22 – a milestone that has been called “The services cliff” – families must ask not just what happens next, but what will happen after the parents are gone.
Below, three women share what it’s like to be ambitious in their careers, date, and communicate with their families while caring for a disabled sibling.
I distinctly remember being like 12, and all of a sudden my parents started going to the gym every day – they had kind of let go of their health but then they were like, if we don’t change, Rekha is going to keep getting bigger, and we have to be able to physically care for her.
My parents were very upfront, like, this is your little sister, she needs your help, don’t ever let her down.
My parents were very up-front, like, this is your little sister, she needs your help, don’t ever let her down.
If my parents pass away, my sister will be my responsibility.

The orginal article.