Summary of “This typewriter repairman was told computers were king. Twenty years later, he’s still in business”

This typewriter repairman was told computers were king.
Twenty years later, Quezada’s shop, International Office Machines in San Gabriel, is still in business.
Unlike the pager, the PDA, the floppy disk and the VCR, the typewriter has escaped the heap of gadgets defunct and disused.
The reason, according to Steve Soboroff, president of the Los Angeles Police Commission and typewriter collector: Its slow pace is meditative, not frustrating, an exercise in deliberateness closer to engraving than typing on a computer.
“In a world that’s too fast and too easy, a typewriter slows you down,” he said.
In the summer, when students were gone and the schools wanted classrooms full of typewriters repaired, the shop had so much business it had to hire temporary workers, Quezada said.
“Around 1980, every little town had a shop that repaired and sold typewriters. A typewriter was expected to be serviced and repaired, and it was expected to last 20, 30 years.”
Quezada took over the shop in the mid-’90s. It wasn’t long before computers were supplanting the typewriter.

The orginal article.