Summary of “The scientific link between boredom and creativity”

As an only child who grew up before the rise of the Internet, boredom was my constant companion.
In another recent study, researchers at the University of Central Lancashire set out to test the link between boredom and creativity.
There’s another big upside to boredom: It encourages us to take action toward a non-boring alternative.
Rachel Kazez, a Chicago-based therapist and founder of All Along, which connects people with mental health resources, sees boredom as a set of mental cues that can reveal important information about our true feelings.
“One of the cues our boredom gives us might be ‘I don’t like this anymore, or I feel trapped here, or I’m not being challenged,” Kazez says.
“One of the cues our boredom gives us might be ‘I don’t like this anymore, or I feel trapped here, or I’m not being challenged.'” And so, if we turn straight to Candy Crush or Twitter whenever we feel bored, we might rush right past an important observation.
In our flight from boredom, we’re also often fleeing from uncomfortable feelings.
Boredom, by contrast, is an opportunity for us to meet our own needs-to turn inward rather than outward and tend our emotions, interact with our creativity, and give our brains a break.

The orginal article.