Summary of “The massive volcano that scientists can’t find”

Scientists didn’t know about the 15th-Century eruption until the 1980s, when they discovered a spike of acidity from around that time in cores taken from polar ice.
The dimming effect of eruptions can be so powerful, artificial ‘volcanoes’ have been suggested as a means of combatting climate change – so Pang figured he would find out exactly when Kuwae erupted by looking for a period of global cooling.
Based on the size of the crater, they estimated that Kuwae’s eruption had released vast quantities of magma, enough to fill the Empire State Building 37 million times over, and shot debris 30 miles into the sky.
There’s no doubt that there are volcanic deposits, but their extent isn’t what you’d expect from a truly massive eruption – Karoly Nemeth, environmental scientist.
Scientists began to refer to the 15th-Century eruption as the “Kuwae” event – the theory was gathering momentum.
Barely more than a decade after the French study on Kuwae’s eruption, a team of scientists returned to the islands surrounding the crater.
“There’s no doubt that there are volcanic deposits, but their extent isn’t what you’d expect from a truly massive eruption,” he says.
When evidence for the ‘unknown eruption’ was discovered in ice cores, people were expecting to find the site, so when the eruption at Kuwae was confirmed, so those researching Kuwae simply connected the dots.

The orginal article.