Summary of “How Leaders Can Open Up to Their Teams Without Oversharing”

We typically find leaders asking themselves how much of their own worries they should reveal when leading their team down a challenging or unfamiliar road. The best leaders are honest about how they feel while simultaneously presenting a clear path forward.
Once you identify your feelings, you need to know how to manage them.
Address your feelings without becoming emotionally leaky.
“The best thing to do is to cop to it. Say to your team, ‘I’m having a bad day, and I’m trying my best not to take it out on you. But if it seems like I’m having a bad day, I am. But it’s not because of you that I’m having a bad day. The last thing I want is for my bad day make your day worse.” You don’t have to go into more detail, but acknowledging your feelings helps you avoid creating unnecessary anxiety among your reports.
A good formula to follow is: “Because of , I’m feeling and. But here’s what I’m planning to do next to make it better:. And here’s what I need from you:. What do you need from me?” This will help you address your anxiety without projecting negative emotions onto your team.
A good rule of thumb for figuring out if you’re about to overshare is to ask yourself: “How would I feel if my manager said this to me?” If it’s something that you’d be thankful to hear, chances are your reports will feel similarly.
If you think members of your team might be feeling anxious about the project, it’s okay to surface those feelings to help them feel less isolated.
If everyone has been working long hours to meet an impending deadline, you might say something like, “I’m feeling a little tired today, but I’m grateful for how well we’ve worked together and that we’re set to send the client a proposal we can all be proud of.” Again, always try to pair realism with optimism, and share when you sense it will be helpful to others.

The orginal article.