Summary of “Why Self-Compassion Beats Self-Confidence”

Dr. Kristin Neff, an associate professor of educational psychology at the University of Texas, suggests a solution to the problem of overconfidence: self-compassion.
“Self-compassion is treating yourself with the same kindness, care and concern you show a loved one,” Dr. Neff said.
“A lot of people think self-compassion is weak, but it’s just the opposite,” Dr. Neff said.
“In general, these studies suggest that self-compassion attenuates people’s reactions to negative events in ways that are distinct from and, in some cases, more beneficial than self-esteem,” the researchers concluded.
Using a 26-item self-report questionnaire that included statements like, “I’m tolerant of my own flaws and inadequacies,” Dr. Neff and her colleagues rated subjects’ level of self-compassion.
According to the study, those who practiced self-compassion were more motivated to admit and apologize for their mistake than people in the self-esteem group or positive distraction group.
The self-compassion group was also more committed to not repeating their mistakes.
What’s more, self-compassion has been shown to help people better empathize with others.

The orginal article.