Summary of “Is it great to be a worker in the U.S? Not compared with the rest of the developed world.”

Joblessness may be low in the United States and employers may be hungry for new hires, but it’s also strikingly easy to lose a job here.
An average of 1 in 5 employees lose or leave their jobs each year, and 23.3 percent of workers ages 15 to 64 had been in their job for a year or less in 2016 – higher than all but a handful of countries in the study.
Decade-old OECD research found an unusually large amount of job turnover in the United States is due to firing and layoffs, and Labor Department figures show the rate of layoffs and firings hasn’t changed significantly since the research was conducted.
The U.S. ranks at the bottom for employee protection even when mass layoffs are taken into consideration as well, despite the 1988 Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act’s requirement that employers give notice 60 days before major plant closings or layoffs.
Fewer than half of displaced workers find a job within a year, the researchers found.
Japan’s rate was similar to the U.S., but Finland, Australia and Denmark were well ahead. Furthermore, the report’s authors find that “Two in three families with a displaced worker fall into poverty for some time.”
The United States spends less of its economic wealth on active efforts to help people who either don’t have a job or who are at risk of becoming unemployed than almost any other country in the study.
Based on an OECD review of almost four decades of data, countries that have decentralized collective-bargaining systems, like the United States, tend to have slower job growth and, in most cases, higher unemployment than other advanced nations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What should the Lakers do now with LeBron James?”

Now that the Los Angeles Lakers have landed LeBron James, how aggressively should they pursue a Kawhi Leonard trade? Our NBA Insiders discuss their options now and where else the Spurs could turn for a possible Leonard deal.
Should the Lakers take that approach with Leonard? Remember, they could sign him outright next year.
The Lakers are really giving up the players and picks they trade plus the potential of an alternative free agent to trade for Leonard now, and that deal wouldn’t be worth it for me unless the Spurs’ price came way, way down.
Once Stephenson and McGee are signed, the Lakers go over the cap and will need to get close to $16 million in outgoing contracts in a Leonard trade.
The presence of James should be a good enough sales pitch to lure Leonard, Butler or possibly James’ old teammate Kyrie.
Marks: If the Lakers take the patient approach, where should the Spurs turn their attention in finding a new home for Leonard?
Even for an All-NBA-level player in Leonard, it would be hard for me to trade Robert Covington and Dario Saric, given Kawhi’s injury concerns and expiring contract.
With LeBron out West, I would take a chance on Leonard if he looks healthy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Exploring the U.S. by RV: The price of adventure”

If we were diligent every step of the way, it might even be possible to resell our RV after the trip and recoup most of what we’d paid for it!
We took weekend test trips to RV parks around Oregon and Washington.
Ten days into the trip, our average spending was over $120 per day – almost twice what we’d hoped to spend.
For the first seven weeks of our trip, we mostly stayed in RV parks and campgrounds.
Ouch! We did not count this against our daily trip budget but instead factored it into our overhead, much like we had with the purchase price of the RV. The Expensive East.
After 150 days on the road, the average for the entire trip was $93.48 per day.
My guess is that our total cost for for the RV trip outside daily expenses was $23,500.
Our adventure across the U.S. truly was the trip of a lifetime.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Schedule Your Day For Peak Creative Performance”

In my first attempt, I mapped out my day hour by hour, squeezing in all the elements of what I defined as an “Ideal day.” After a few weeks, I ended up feeling like a robot and the predictability was anything but inspiring.
That’s when I decided to zoom out and think more about the categories of an ideal day and how I can batch my time to be most effective.
Work: For each day, I outline my “Top 3,” meaning the three most important things I will have accomplished by the end of the day.
Fit: Movement keeps ideas moving forward so I aim to move my body for at least 30 minutes each day.
Push: Since learning and growth is important to me, I do something that scares me every day.
On these days, instead of thinking about how to spend my time in advance, I pay attention to my body and take breaks as needed.
Balancing structure with a day of free-spiritedness makes me feel whole.
How do you get to peak creative performance? Tell me about it in the comments below.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You probably know to ask yourself, “What do I want?” Here’s a way better question”

If I ask you, “What do you want out of life?” and you say something like, “I want to be happy and have a great family and a job I like,” it’s so ubiquitous that it doesn’t even mean anything.
A more interesting question, a question that perhaps you’ve never considered before, is what pain do you want in your life? What are you willing to struggle for? Because that seems to be a greater determinant of how our lives turn out.
What determines your success isn’t “What do you want to enjoy?” The question is, “What pain do you want to sustain?” The quality of your life is not determined by the quality of your positive experiences but the quality of your negative experiences.
Because if you want the benefits of something in life, you have to also want the costs.
If you want the beach body, you have to want the sweat, the soreness, the early mornings, and the hunger pangs.
If you want the yacht, you have to also want the late nights, the risky business moves, and the possibility of pissing off a person or ten thousand.
If you find yourself wanting something month after month, year after year, yet nothing happens and you never come any closer to it, then maybe what you actually want is a fantasy, an idealization, an image and a false promise.
Maybe what you want isn’t what you want, you just enjoy wanting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are humans really blind to the gorilla on the basketball court?”

In his book Thinking, Fast and Slow, the Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman highlights this experiment and argues that it reveals something fundamental about the human mind, namely, that humans are ‘blind to the obvious, and that we also are blind to our blindness’.
Missing any one of these things isn’t a basis for saying that humans are blind.
So if the gorilla experiment doesn’t illustrate that humans are blind to the obvious, then what exactly does it illustrate? What’s an alternative interpretation, and what does it tell us about perception, cognition and the human mind?
Given the problem of too much evidence – again, think of all the things that are evident in the gorilla clip – humans try to hone in on what might be relevant for answering particular questions.
Because humans are blind and biased, and can’t separate the noise from the signal, human decision-making should increasingly be left to computers and decision algorithms.
The argument that humans are blind to the obvious is admittedly far more memorable than an interpretation that simply says that humans respond to questions.
To illustrate just how far we’ve come in ridiculing human capacities, in 2017 Kahneman concluded his aforementioned presentation to academics by arguing that computers or robots are better than humans on three essential dimensions: they are better at statistical reasoning and less enamoured with stories; they have higher emotional intelligence; and they exhibit far more wisdom than humans.
Of course, if we compare humans and computers on their ability to compute, then there is no question that computers outperform humans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What I’ve learned from nearly three years of enterprise Wi-Fi at home”

What you’re about to read is a write-up of my experience with Ubiquiti’s Unifi gear over the past couple of years-what I bought, why I bought it, and what I did with it.
At one point I had damn near twice as many APs as I needed, and I overcomplicated things to the point of insanity more than once-the Unifi system is the embodiment of “Enough rope to hang yourself with” for a curious home system administrator.
Unifi my Wi-Fi. Ubiquiti makes all manner of stuff, ranging from wired gear to full-on heavy-duty WISP equipment.
EdgeMAX gear is intended to be standalone, used for enterprise-grade switching and routing without the software-defined networking special sauce exclusive to the Unifi line.
Much of the Unifi line slots nicely into the prosumer and/or SMB space-it offers features appealing both to homelab enthusiasts and also to businesses needing to do medium-to-large Wi-Fi deployments.
You might save a ton of money going with Unifi gear over Cisco gear, but when it’s midnight on a Saturday and your production system is down, Cisco will be there with a replacement part within four hours.
With Unifi gear, you’ll be waiting for FedEx to drop off replacement parts maybe on Monday after you arrange an RMA, unless you happen to have bought from a VAR that also sells aftermarket support.
Unifi and MikroTik also both appeal to SMB customers by not saddling their products with feature licensing fees-fees which are annoyingly common at the top end where it’s presumed customers have fat enterprise IT budgets to spend.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The George Soros philosophy”

To which Barr responded in the most depressing way possible, repeating false claims earlier proferred by rightwing media personalities: “Sorry to have tweeted incorrect info about you! Please forgive me! By the way, George Soros is a nazi who turned in his fellow Jews 2 be murdered in German concentration camps & stole their wealth – were you aware of that? But, we all make mistakes, right Chelsea?”.
Unlike Gates and Zuckerberg, Soros has long pointed to academic philosophy as his source of inspiration.
As he witnessed the Soviet empire’s downfall between 1989 and 1991, Soros needed to answer a crucial strategic question: now that the closed societies of eastern Europe were opening, what was his foundation to do? On the eve of the Soviet Union’s dissolution, Soros published an updated version of Opening the Soviet System, titled Underwriting Democracy, which revealed his new strategy: he would dedicate himself to building permanent institutions that would sustain the ideas that motivated anticommunist revolutions, while modelling the practices of open society for the liberated peoples of eastern Europe.
How could Soros ensure that newly opened societies would remain free? Soros had come of age in the era of the Marshall Plan, and experienced American largesse firsthand in postwar London.
Still, Soros hoped that, somehow, American policymakers would accept that, for their own best interests, they needed to lead a coalition of democracies dedicated to “Promoting the development of open societies [and] strengthening international law and the institutions needed for a global open society”.
The George W Bush administration’s militarist response to the attacks of September 11 compelled Soros to shift his attention from economics to politics.
In his 2006 book The Age of Fallibility, Soros attributed Bush’s re-election to the fact that the US was “a ‘feel-good’ society unwilling to face unpleasant reality”.
In his successful re-election campaign earlier this year, Orbán spent much of his time on the campaign trail demonising Soros, playing on antisemitic tropes and claiming that Soros was secretly plotting to send millions of immigrants to Hungary.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Tunnel That Could Break New York”

Christie says he acted out of substantive objections to the ARC project itself, which would have required New York to pay nothing and New Jersey to cover all cost overruns, and would have delivered its passengers to a terminus oddly located below the Macy’s basement a full block from Penn Station.
The administration has even rejected New York and New Jersey proposals to finance their share of Gateway with federal loans, arguing the loans shouldn’t count as state contributions, even though they have counted as state contributions on other projects.
The administration’s larger argument is that New York and New Jersey are relying too heavily on federal taxpayers for a mostly local project.
None of those answers has gotten traction in Trump world, where some aides call the project “Hateway.” The heads of Trump’s short-lived infrastructure advisory council, his fellow New York developers Richard LeFrak and Steven Roth, once startled Gateway’s backers in a meeting by suggesting New York and New Jersey finance the project by selling off one of the area’s airports.
“If this tunnel is so great, New York and New Jersey should pay for it,” says North Carolina Congressman Ted Budd, who led the fight against Gateway in the House.
The avid support for Gateway from potential 2020 Democrats like Cuomo, New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and New Jersey Senator Cory Booker hasn’t helped, nor the moral-imperative tone its supporters tend to use.
Trump grew up in New York and shaped the skyline of New York-and many of his donors live here, too-but his home base is not his political base.
The system is already straining, and several Gateway backers suggested to me that it might take a crisis that shuts down a tunnel and gridlocks New York to shake the political system out of its inertia, just as it took the 2008 financial crisis to drive financial reform.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lakers signings part of Magic’s plan”

Shortly after LeBron James announced he would sign a four-year, $153 million deal with the Los Angeles Lakers on Sunday evening, his longtime ear-whisperer, Lance Stephenson, agreed to become his teammate.
Here is the answer: exactly what James and Lakers president Magic Johnson planned when they met for more than three hours on the first night of free agency.
According to multiple sources within the Lakers and close to James, this is the rollout of a plan Johnson outlined for James the night of June 30 at James’ home.
The subsequent deals, which sources say James has consulted on but have been executed at Johnson and Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka’s direction, follow this vision.
The Lakers are indeed attempting to chart a new course for James’ Lakers future, one that is vastly different from the style of basketball he played with the Cleveland Cavaliers.
“Unlike most free agents changing teams, LeBron is arriving with the Lakers as an all-time great,” a source close to James said.
What Johnson pitched to James was a team stocked with tough-minded playmakers like Stephenson and Rondo who could free up James to finish in the lanes and from the post, rather than having to create the lion’s share of the offense himself.
Beyond James’ role, the Lakers realize they have a young team and see adding Rondo as a key piece to provide leadership besides James.

The orginal article.