Summary of “Plus-Size Vintage Really Is Hard to Find”

In a 2017 video on her store’s YouTube channel, Mason addresses an issue that’s top of mind for people who want to shop vintage but find their size is excluded from the usual available inventory: For as rich an array as the United States has of vintage clothing stores – with shops specializing in everything from designer wear to accessibly priced A-line dresses – the availability of vintage clothes isn’t limited by price; rather, it’s limited by size.
That is, trying to find plus-size vintage clothing is like trying to find a proverbial needle in the haystack, assuming the needle is a plus-size garment and the haystack is the overall retail market.
Even for straight-size people, finding vintage clothing above what today would generally be considered a size eight is an often unfruitful pursuit.
To better understand the lack of easily accessible plus-size vintage clothing, it’s important to examine systemic causes, not population data.
Emma McClendon, the associate curator of costume at the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, also explains that within vintage fashion, there exists a “Survival bias” that is skewed toward straight-size clothing, meaning that straight-size pieces that often find their way to vintage stores and museums are valued above plus-size garments and survive to make it into the historical record.
“Within the vintage historical record, vintage stores have buyers like any other retail outlet, and in the same way there’s a bias in retail where [buyers] don’t buy certain sizes, there’s going to be that in vintage as well,” McClendon tells Racked.
The combination of survival bias and the lack of mass manufactured plus-size clothing between the 1930s and ’70s leads us to where we are today: with a deeply lacking availability of fashionable, plus-size vintage clothing relative to straight sizes.
Kate Lauter, the owner of Feng Sway vintage in Brooklyn, regularly seeks out plus-size vintage to add to her inventory, stocking up to a size 5X at any given time, and admits that much of her plus-size inventory comes from the ’80s and ’90s. The Lo Marie Vintage, which runs an Etsy shop for its vintage clothing, also attempts to stock as much plus-size vintage as possible but notes that the sizing inconsistencies that plague shoppers today are not unique to the 21st century.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Is Your Intent? Reminding Yourself Why You Do What You Do.”

Once you’re clear about your deepest desires, you can start thinking about the ways that you can achieve it.
An intent is who we aspire to be – as individuals, members of our community or citizens of our planet.
An intent represents our deepest desires – those emotional and spiritual yearnings that we ask for when we are honest and authentic.
What desire will that fulfill? Remember to be honest with yourself – this is a personal exercise.
In the morning, before you start work, set an intent just for today.
My intent is to express gratitude to my coworkers today.
Once you’re clear about your deepest desires, you can start thinking about the ways you can achieve them.
Once we know our intents, we get more comfortable expressing our desires to ourselves, to our loved ones and to our community.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Houston is Still Wrestling With How to Prepare for the Next Big Storm”

As a Houston Chronicle editorial noted at the time, “We must not forget this tragedy as we did the one in 1929. Houston has been visited by four serious floods in the last 40 years, each worse than the preceding one. The Chronicle has pointed out repeatedly since 1929 that the … development of widespread Houston residential sections, with storm sewers turning floods of water into the bayou after every rain, has steadily increased the hazard.”
As famed architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable wrote in the New York Times during the boom years of the seventies, “Houston is all process and no plan. Gertrude Stein said of Oakland that there was no t.here, there. One might say of Houston that one never gets there. It feels as if one is always on the way, always arriving, always looking for the place where everything comes together.”
In the past year, innumerable let’s-do-this studies have been published, with titles like “Build It Forward,” “Houston at the Crossroads: Resilience and Sustainability in the 21st Century,” and the surely compelling “Greater Houston Strategies for Flood Mitigation.” Most consist of similar concepts, ranging from the mundane to the spectacular: buying out homes in irretrievably flood-prone neighborhoods, building higher foundations in areas that can be protected from all but the worst flooding, improving drainage, widening bay.
Thanks to a spate of post-Harvey articles published everywhere from the Houston Chronicle to the Atlantic, many around Houston know that a) the Netherlands floods a lot, and b) because of that, the Dutch have become the world’s leading experts in combating flooding.
Storm surge is by far the biggest flooding concern in the Netherlands, while Houston must also account for the overbuilding problem.
You may recall Governor Greg Abbott’s snide remark in June 2017 that it was “Great to be out of the People’s Republic of Austin.” This prompted a retort from Houston mayor Sylvester Turner in the Houston Chronicle.
Remarkably, no one knows how much federal funding Texas will actually get and, in turn, how much will go to Houston and Harris County.
McCasland, wearing a navy City of Houston polo, moved through a PowerPoint presentation highlighting changes he hoped to make in housing policies so that “Next time it rains here, people don’t die in Houston.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to minimize jet lag? Here’s what the doctors order.”

Caldwell explains that while our bodies are able to adjust to about one time zone change per day, jet lag sets in when we cross three or more of them, because it wreaks havoc on our circadian rhythms.
Work to align your sleep schedule with your destination: Because your body can naturally adjust to about only one time-zone change per day, you’ll want to manually adjust your schedule, and that means changing your bedtime to be better mesh with the destination to which you’re traveling.
To be ready to hit the ground running when she arrives, she starts adjusting her bedtime two to five days in advance to match the local time at her destination.
Caldwell creates a timetable so that, at a glance, he can see what time it is at home and at his destination and plan accordingly.
“Similarly, bright light exposure after waking up also will help advance our biological clock to suit the new time zone.” When traveling westward, he adds, the biological clock is ahead of the latest time zone.
It provides a brief plan to avoid jet lag, sharing the ideal time to get to sleep and the ideal time for light exposure.
“Taking a very small dose helps to recalibrate its release so that it is in sync with the time zone of your destination,” says Kern Singh, a spine surgeon in Chicago with Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush.
Turn your wine into water: Having a glass of wine or two on the plane may sound tempting, but it could negatively impact your sleep, which could worsen jet lag, says Quay Snyder, president and CEO of Aviation Medicine Advisory Service of Centennial, Colo., who advises pilots on staying in top condition while in the air.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is Education a Fundamental Right?”

In Brown, the Court had described an education as “a right which must be made available to all on equal terms.” But the Detroit plaintiffs also cite Plyler, in which the majority deemed illiteracy to be “An enduring disability,” identified the absolute denial of education as a violation of the equal-protection clause, and ruled that no state can “Deny a discrete group of innocent children the free public education that it offers to other children residing within its borders.” Dismissed by a district court in June, the case is now headed to the Sixth Circuit on appeal.
In June, the Texas State Teachers Association called on the governor of the state to make provisions for the education of the detained children, before the beginning of the school year, but has so far received no reply.
The Judge had a policy preference: “The predictable effects of depriving an undocumented child of an education are clear and undisputed. Already disadvantaged as a result of poverty, lack of English-speaking ability, and undeniable racial prejudices, these children, without an education, will become permanently locked into the lowest socio-economic class.” But the question didn’t turn on anyone’s policy preferences; it turned on the Fourteenth Amendment.
Is education a fundamental right? The Constitution, drafted in the summer of 1787, does not mention a right to education, but the Northwest Ordinance, passed by Congress that same summer, held that “Religion, morality, and knowledge, being necessary to good government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall forever be encouraged.” By 1868 the constitutions of twenty-eight of the thirty-two states in the Union had provided for free public education, open to all.
Justice noted, so are other children, including native-born children, and children who have immigrated legally, and their families are not asked to bear the cost of their special education.
For Powell, establishing education as a fundamental right invited claims: are health care, food, and shelter fundamental rights, too?
Education is not a constitutional right, he wrote, “But neither is it merely some governmental ‘benefit.'” Undocumented migrants are not a suspect class, but their children are vulnerable, and laws that discriminate against them, while not subject to strict scrutiny, deserved “Heightened scrutiny.” Powell wrote to Brennan after reading the draft, “Your final product is excellent and will be in every text and case book on Constitutional law.”
“Powell wanted the case to be about the education of children, not the equal protection rights of immigrants, and so the decision was,” Linda Greenhouse remarked in a careful study of the Court’s deliberations, published a decade ago.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Serena Williams Used the Most Beautiful Service Toss in Tennis to Beat Her Sister Venus at the U.S. Open”

Serena Williams has the most beautiful service toss in tennis-aesthetically pleasing, effortlessly smooth, the ball gently leaving the left hand of a player whose game is anything but gentle.
Serena drubbed her sister Venus on Friday night, 6-1, 6-2, because her toss was preternaturally consistent and spectacularly functional.
Most tennis players are taught to serve with that arm and hand, and thus, when serving, toss the ball with their non-dominant arm and hand.
Here is something rarer: her beautiful toss has no “Tells.” Even most very good servers indicate with their toss what kind of serve is coming: out front for a flat serve, out wide a bit toward the racquet-hand side for a slice, above the crown of the head for a topspin kick serve.
True, of the ten aces Serena struck, it wouldn’t have mattered even if Venus had guessed right: they were simply too good, painting the lines.
Beyond the aces, there were many Serena serves that Venus got a racquet on and never got back over the net, and many others that she did get over the net, but which landed short or smack in the center of the court-balls Serena could pounce on to take control of the point.
Venus just could not get into enough points when Serena was serving to create the kinds of angles that would have tested that ankle.
Serena Williams played the best match since her return to the game after giving birth to her daughter, nearly a year ago.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Amazonization of Whole Foods, one year in – TechCrunch”

At the time, Amazon said the goal was to make “High-quality, natural and organic food affordable for everyone.” Bananas, avocados and even tilapia was going to be cheaper than before.
A bunch of other Amazon offerings involving delivery options were also mentioned, including the getting of Whole Food groceries through a then new Amazon Fresh grocery delivery program and Whole Foods private label products would be made available through Prime Now and Prime Pantry.
Further, Amazon lockers would be showing up at select stores to make pick ups and returns easier for Amazon customers.
Walking into my local Whole Foods, the Amazon branding is everywhere from the deep orange lockers off to the side, the large, green Amazon Fresh coolers greeting me at the entrance to the parking lot and rows of bags ready for pickup and delivery via Amazon workers.
You want to do one better, just download the Amazon app to your smartphone, use the code given and then purchase with Apple pay using your Amazon Prime credit card for maximum benefits.
I’ve also enjoyed using the integrated partnership to order Whole Foods items straight from my Amazon Fresh account.
With Amazon, I can order from various stores, including Whole Foods through my Amazon Fresh account all in one order and then choose a time for delivery.
There’s still some bumps with that process – you can’t order every item available in Whole Foods, just what Fresh offers that week through the Amazon platform.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Future of Music Festivals Is the Internet?”

This year a wall of ferns situated stage right became the latest quirk at one of America’s most unusual music festivals.
Pickathon’s founder is fortifying the festival’s digital presence amid increasing turbulence in the world of live music.
The same year Pickathon kicked off, a concert promoter named Paul Tollett started another underfunded music festival in the desert of Southern California.
The festival lost nearly a million dollars and might have been a forgotten blip in the history of live music.
It’s placing an intense strain on the festivals just below the top tier, which can face devastating financial straits if music fans don’t show up.
Might the challenge of trekking to a festival and the risk that the whole thing turns out to be a Ja Rule-endorsed scam convince young people that it’s simply not worth the effort? Why leave home to enjoy live music when YouTube will beam it directly to your bedroom? Insiders in the live music business are confident that the appeal of festivals will be ongoing, and not just a fad taken up by millennials.
Despite its elaborate digital efforts, Pickathon will not have the most popular online music festival event of the year.
Festivals often include the right to livestream a set in the contracts that artists sign but have to renegotiate for other rights to the music, as Pickathon does for its original videos.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s a big problem with immortality: it goes on and on”

What sort of life would that be? Immortality – the film is suggesting – might be a curse, rather than a blessing.
The moral philosopher Samuel Scheffler at New York University has suggested that the real problem with a fantasy of immortality is that it doesn’t make sense as a coherent desire.
A desire for immortality is thus a paradox: it would frustrate itself were it ever to be achieved.
There is something both deeply and persistently appealing about the idea of immortality, and that cannot be dispelled by simply pointing to examples where immortality would be a curse.
On the face of it, a desire for immortality most obviously seems to be a response to the fear of death.
Immortality might itself turn out to be one of them.
The contrast with immortality as being somehow unable to die is clear.
Immortality is, obviously enough, an impossible fantasy – hence it cannot be a genuine solution to the unfortunate yet elemental facts of the human condition, nor an answer to the fraught complexities surrounding euthanasia as regards both social policy and moral judgment.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Scientists found brain’s internal clock that influences how we perceive time”

Now, a team of Norwegian scientists has confirmed the mechanism the brain uses to make sense of the passage of time as we experience something, thanks to the help of a chocolate-loving lab rat.
Manmade clocks may precisely measure time from a human perspective, the passage of time is remarkably fluid.
Isolate yourself from any markers of time and you will feel less time has passed than actually has, because under those circumstances, the brain condenses time.
How the brain fixes the timing of the events we experience depends on episodic memory.
Our time tracking system has to be flexible because the perception of time depends on context.
How your brain records the passage of time when you are engaged in a mundane repetitive task like playing Solitaire will be different from how it does so if you are experiencing Thai food for the first time.
“The time signal became more precise and predictable during the repetitive task.” They were seeing the changing shape of time in response to different experiences.
“We have found an area with activity so strongly relating to the time of an event or experience, it may open up a whole new research field,” he said.

The orginal article.