Summary of “How SuperShadow Tortured Star Wars Fans on the Internet for 20 Years”

There was never a good reason to take SuperShadow seriously as a news source.
Once the jig was up, he could have faded into obscurity.
As anyone who hung around message boards and in movie website comments sections of the time knows, goofing on Suttle was the pre-social media equivalent of quote-tweeting Dinesh D’Souza, Tomi Lahren, or President Donald J. Trump.
The more Suttle was singled out for cheap-and-easy laughs, the more popular he became.
“Truth be told,” says Rhea, “I think a lot of us, myself included, helped inflate his importance by being so gung-ho about disliking him.”
The original Legendary Iconic SuperShadow Ultra Infinite Mega Genius is no more, but his form of relentless self-aggrandizement is a thriving way of life for tens of millions of Americans today.
In the Star Wars microcosm, sounding off about the upcoming movies sans facts is now a lucrative cottage industry; one only has to look around to see the same practices working on a larger scale.
SuperShadow created a world in which he was always right about Star Wars, and he lived there happily, a fake-news publisher ahead of his time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How natural gas can protect your home from power outages and climate change”

Instead of the typical long, overground cables connected to large power plants, a microgrid has short cables connected to small power generators that operate independent of any given region’s power grid.
On an acre and half, FuelCell had built a natural-gas power plant that feeds into Bridgeport’s city grid.
Instead of hydrogen, FuelCell’s products burn natural gas without the harmful emissions.
FuelCell’s power plants have already eliminated sulfur and nitrogen emissions.
Thanks to FuelCell Energy, the university relies less on state power and thus pays something like 10% less on electricity than it would otherwise.
FuelCell Energy has built the world’s largest fuel-cell park in South Korea, producing 59 MW of electricity, enough to power more than 6o,000 households, and recently received an order to build a 40 MW plant on Long Island.
ExxonMobil’s hope is to build FuelCell plants that are much larger, perhaps hundreds of MW, to enable carbon capture on even larger gas-fired power plants.
The price becomes even more palatable for potential large-scale use when it includes carbon capture-especially if in the process you don’t lower the output of the main power plant-and even more so if the FuelCell add-on helps produce even more electricity, which we’ll certainly need to support a growing global population and a move to electric cars.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The FCC’s Democratic commissioners on net neutrality vote: ‘We have a mess on our hands'”

So I support net neutrality, and I think it is important for this commission to sustain that policy.
I think right now the record in response to our rulemaking on net neutrality has over 23 million comments, and in many ways that’s very exciting because the public is speaking out in droves on this issue.
“We have a mess on our hands.” I’m learning more every day, but I think this agency needs to halt, stop, and figure out what happened.
There’s a Republican majority right now, and I think a lot of people watching expect that the proposal will pass.
You mentioned “Legally sustainable.” I think that’s something that a lot of people are hanging their hat on now.
Surely we should not do that as a federal partner to the states, but I question – honestly, not being a lawyer – but I question not only the legality of the direction that they’re headed, because I think it’s problematic.
It’s just hurtful, and I think it’s counterproductive.
We’re moving in the wrong direction, and I think December 14th will mark a very sad day in regulatory history.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is the Most Important Fallacy You’ve Never Heard Of”

She’s written two books on poker strategy, and next year will release a book called Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don’t Have All the Facts.
If a well-reasoned decision leads to a negative outcome, was it the wrong decision? How do we distinguish between luck and skill? And how do we move beyond our cognitive biases?
You get into these complex situations where the outcome is the result of multiple decisions.
You can think about it as creating too tight a relationship between the quality of the outcome and the quality of the decision.
You can’t use outcome quality as a perfect signal of decision quality, not with a small sample size anyway.
If we know that outcomes infect us, we want to separate ourselves from outcomes as much as we possibly can when we’re thinking about decision quality.
Doesn’t matter to me whether you got in an accident or not-I should be able to ask you questions to decide whether your decision quality while you were driving was good, because there’s certain things that I do know go into a good decision about driving.
You should be sort of trying to think about that for yourself, but also, don’t talk about the outcome when you’re asking other people about the quality of their decisions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Review: ‘The New Testament: A Translation,’ by David Bentley Hart”

For David Bentley Hart whose mind-bending translation of the New Testament was published in October, the Word-as a word-does not suffice: He finds it to be “a curiously bland and impenetrable designation” for the heady concept expressed in the original Greek of the Gospels as Logos.
The Chinese word Tao might get at it, Hart tells us, but English has nothing with quite the metaphysical flavor of Logos, the particular sense of a formative moral energy diffusing itself, without diminution, through space and time.
It’s significant, this act of lexical surrender, because if you’d bet on anyone to come up with a fancy English word for Logos, it’d be David Bentley Hart.
So what has he done to the New Testament, this bristling one-man band of a Christian literatus? The surprising aim, Hart tells us in his introduction, was to be as bare-bones and-where appropriate-unsqueamishly prosaic as he can.
In Hart we can hear more clearly both the leper’s challenge-heal me!-and the quickness and intimacy of Jesus’s response.
“Dearly beloved,” runs the King James Version of 1 Peter 2:11, “I beseech you as strangers and pilgrims” Hart is more immigration-conscious: “Beloved ones, I exhort you as sojourners and resident aliens”.
“The sole literary claim I make for my version,” writes Hart, “Is that my mulish stubbornness regarding the idiosyncrasies of the text allowed me to ‘do the police in different voices,’ so to speak.” That’s no small claim, actually, and it takes a little unpacking.
Hart opted for blissful over the traditional blessed, he writes, because the original Greek, makarios, “Suggested a special intensity of delight and freedom from care that the more shopworn renderings no longer quite capture.” So now we hear it, and are shocked by it: not the ambiguous benediction of blessed, but the actual bliss, right now, of destitution, the emancipation of everything being stripped away.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Secret Life of ‘Um'”

So if you are late, it suggests you were not able to hit that target because of some trouble in finding the words you wanted.
You’re not going to lose anything too significant, and the reason is you’ve changed the context completely in which people are going to consume those words.
At the moment, the words I’m producing are being interpreted by you in real time.
What they’re doing is telling you, “No, that word is not what I meant, I’ve doubled back and I’m now going to replace that word with this word.” Or, “Wait a second, I’m about to get the word I’m looking for.” But as soon as you transcribe those, people are not consuming the words at the same time and place as I’ve created them.
Beck: So you don’t need the words that you use to edit yourself anymore because I’m literally editing you?
If you want to game the system, and all you want to do is hold the floor, then words like “Um” can be exploited in that way.
What does using words like “Um” have to do with morality?
It’s that whole moral architecture that human beings have, it’s the root of so much of our cultural life and our social life: the defining of what’s appropriate, what’s inappropriate, and policing those things and judging others on the basis of those things.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Silicon Valley Kowtows To China”

Why do CEOs such as Cook, and Google’s Sundar Pichai, attend these types of events? What is the impact of their participation in and statements at these events likely to be? How much influence do these large companies have over China’s internet regulation and what do they stand to gain or lose by publicly supporting internet freedom? -The ChinaFile Editors.
Shaun Rein, founder and managing director of the China Market Research GroupChina employs the power of its wallet-both the State’s and the consumer’s wallet combined together-to reward brands that heed the wants of China politically, while using this same power to punish countries and, increasingly, companies that go against China’s wants politically.
The rewards China bestows on the these foreign internet companies can be huge-China is Apple’s largest market outside of the United States.
Zeng Jinyan, writer, scholar, activist, and documentary filmmakerAt the 4th World Internet Conference, Apple CEO Tim Cook defended Apple’s removal of VPN apps from the app store in China, saying that China should not be criticized.
Chinese long have known that Apple products sold inside China are not the company’s authentic advanced technology.
Apple products sold in China are modified to suit the Chinese government rather than Chinese consumers.
Chen Weihua, chief Washington correspondent for China Daily and the deputy editor of China Daily USA. This is not a new debate at all.
I want to repeat my argument in the Google case in 2010: If you want to help change China for the better, you should involve China in your work and be there on the ground.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Blizzard Made the Unwatchable Colts-Bills Matchup Watchable”

The Bills-Colts game is how football is meant to be played.
The Colts got the ball for their first possession of the game after a failed Bills fourth down attempt.
Punts looked like this, and the game only got loonier from there.
Jacoby Brissett promptly engineered a 19-play, nine minute and 53-second drive that ended with a touchdown pass to tight end Jack Doyle to make the game 7-6.
With Vinatieri already having missed an extra point-length kick, Colts coach Chuck Pagano opted to go for a two-point conversion that would likely decide the game, something coaches should do way more often, not just when the weather forces their hand.
With Vinatieri’s spot cleared the soon-to-be 45-year-old kicker kicked a curveball that broke perfectly into the uprights.
Vinatieri’s kick sliced in so dramatically and broke so late that Bills players were initially celebrating after the kick.
Two plays later, the Colts intercepted Webb in Bills territory and gave Vinatieri a shot at a 43-yard field goal with six seconds left and a chance to go down as the SOAT, but he missed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Scientists are slowly unlocking the secrets of the Earth’s mysterious hum”

If we could hear this music more clearly, scientists around the world say, it could reveal deep secrets about the earth beneath us, or even teach us to map out alien planets.
Earth vibrates at different frequencies and amplitudes, for different reasons, and not all those vibrations are the ‘hum’.
Sometimes a wave on a shallow coast somewhere ripples over the rough sea floor and adds its own frequencies to the hum.
Some researchers believe the hum extends all the way down to the Earth’s core, and some have even fantasized about using hums on other planets to map out alien geography.
Yet we’re still only beginning to understand our planet’s hum.
These stations were meant to study volcanic hot spots – nothing to do with the hum – but the team worked out a method to clean the data of ocean currents, waves, glitches and other noise.
It peaked between 2.9 and 4.5 millihertz, they said – a tighter range than the first hum researchers in the 1990s had recorded.
So – more evidence that the hum goes all the way around the world; and more hope that we may one day reveal all that goes on beneath it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jim Simons, the Numbers King”

“Every day, he walks into the lobby and sees his mother’s picture,” Jim Simons, the institute’s founder, told me.
Simons works out of a top-floor corner office across the street from the institute, in a building occupied by its administrative parent, the Simons Foundation.
Simons has amassed the same processing capacity as would normally be present in the computer hub of a mid-sized research university: the equivalent of six thousand high-end laptops.
Marilyn Simons told me that her husband is an “Information processor,” adding, “Whatever it is, he’ll chew it up.” Jim Simons told me that he’s more comfortable discussing astronomy than biology, because he understands the presentations better, but he seemed adept at following abstruse discussions in both fields.
For Simons, ideas and money have always been intertwined.
His chairmanship coincided with the era of Nelson Rockefeller, the ambitious governor of New York, who wanted the school to be the “Berkeley of the East.” Under Simons, the department expanded and gained in prestige.
Jim and Marilyn Simons became major charitable donors in the nineteen-nineties, when they launched their foundation.
“My concern is that the generosity of Jim Simons will let the rest of us off the hook,” he said.

The orginal article.