Summary of “Forensic Science Put Jimmy Genrich in Prison for 24 Years. What if It Wasn’t Science?”

Did you know you can support The Nation by drinking wine? 1: THE BOMBINGS. The first bomb didn’t kill anyone.
When the van rolled forward, a bomb that had been hidden in the left rear wheel well exploded.
The next day, federal agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms descended on the town of roughly 30,000 to assist local investigators with what appeared to be a serial bomber.
The police were stymied, people were scared, and the pressure to find a culprit mounted.
“We certainly don’t want to create hysteria or paranoia in the community,” a police lieutenant told the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel after warning people to check around their cars for bombs.
“People use dynamite. People work in the oil patch. People set bombs off for fun,” said Ellen Miller, a former correspondent for The Denver Post who covered the story.
“I mean, seriously. People knew what pipe bombs were.” Then, in early July, police received a nervous call from a woman who worked at the Readmor bookstore on Main Street.
A 28-year-old local man named Jimmy Genrich had asked them to order The Anarchist Cookbook, a manual that contains, among other things, instructions on how to make a pipe bomb.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Resist The Darkness. Support Philadelphia.”

Chris Long has donated his entire salary to schools in Charlottesville and other cities.
The most Philly moment I have ever personally experienced: I was in college and working at Dalessandro’s, one of the city’s famous cheesesteak shops, and the Philadelphia 76ers were in the NBA Finals.
They were led by Allen Iverson, a fearless point guard who played with the kind of rage that made him a hero to the city.
Over the next two days, the city lost its collective mind and many of us had convinced ourselves the Sixers were locks to win the series.
Sports writers often portray the city as a hellscape populated by Neanderthals communicating exclusively through Eagles chants and hurled batteries.
If all you know about this city is that one time, many years ago, some fans threw snowballs at a very shabby Santa, then you don’t know anything about the city.
The entire city came to life and, at least for the night, loved one another with the kind of exuberance you cannot manufacture.
A friend texted to say he’s thinking of selling his car so he can go to Minneapolis; not to buy tickets for the game, just to go to the city while the game is happening.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Everyone Hates Setting Goals. Here’s How Google Makes It Easier for Its Employees”

On Google’s re:Work site, a resource that shares the company’s perspective on people operations, Google explains the concept.
Objectives are the “Big picture.” They answer the questions “Where do we want to go?” and “What do we want to do?” Also, objectives are where Google encourages its employees to stretch themselves, be ambitious, and embrace uncertainty.
If you don’t get nervous or feel a little uncomfortable after setting a goal, then you haven’t reached high enough.
Because they are designed to stretch employees, Google recommends only three to five objectives total.
Anything more, and Google knows that it runs the risk of spreading employees too thin.
What Google warns against are goals that don’t “Push for new achievements.” The examples they share are: “Keep hiring,” “Maintain market position,” or “Continue doing X.”.
Google includes everyone’s goals on their internal directory.
In a YouTube video that explains how Google uses OKRs, Rick Klau provided some additional clarity on the process: “Personal OKRs define what the person is working on. Team OKRs define priorities for the team, not just a collection of individual OKRs. Company OKRs are big picture, a top-level focus for the entire company.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can you really save for a deposit by ditching coffee and avocado toast? I tried to find out​”

I find the argument that I could afford a house simply by going without luxuries for a few years hard to swallow when the average deposit for first-time buyers is £32,899.
On one point he is firm, however: while it is possible to be approved for a mortgage with a deposit of only 5%, to be able to truly afford a property I need at least 10%, ideally 20%. “But that’s a very difficult amount to save when you’re already paying rent,” he says.
He wants me to understand “Opportunity cost”: the long-term loss that results from spending your money on option A rather than option B – in my case, spending £4.50 on lunch, rather than my future first-home deposit.
“But if you spend 625 quid a year on coffee and then say: ‘I can’t save up for a deposit on a house,’ you’re starting to lose a bit of the moral argument.”
“The second thing,” he says, “Is that this is not the spending diary of someone who is looking to save money.” To be fair, he adds, I had said as much when we first spoke.
Scanning my spending diary, he says it would be “Very possible” for me to save from £400 to as much as £700 of my disposable income each month by cutting back on coffees, lunches out, rounds at the pub and holidays.
Saving between £4,800 and £8,400 each year – hopefully more, if my salary increases in the future or I find someone to go halves on a house with – I could reach a 10% deposit of £35,000 in between four and eight years, says Lewis.
“I think the classic problem with you,” says Lewis, not unkindly, “Is that you talk about efforts to save money, but I don’t think you’re persuaded in your head of the reason for doing it. If you want to do this, you need to make that decision in your head and start to live your life – as the focused, ambitious person that you are – with one of your ambitions being to save a deposit for a house, so that you actually get a kick out of the fact: ‘I’ve brought in sandwiches to work for two months. I’ve got this much extra money. Boom!’ You need that mentality and you don’t have it.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How WeChat came to rule China”

Now, WeChat is poised to take on an even greater role: an initiative is underway to integrate WeChat with China’s electronic ID system.
It may be hard for people outside of China to grasp just how influential WeChat has become there.
“For all intents and purposes WeChat is your phone, and to a far greater extent in China than anywhere else, your phone is everything,” wrote Ben Thompson, consultant and founder of the blog Stratechery.
Last year, Tencent added mini-apps to WeChat, creating an app store of sorts: inside WeChat, you can play games, pay bills, find local hangouts, book doctor appointments, file police reports, hail taxis, hold video conferences, and access bank services.
“WeChat becomes harder and harder for its users to opt out,” says Yuhua Wang, a former Shanghai resident who wrote a piece called “How WeChat grows into a huge part of our life,” for USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.
Since WeChat requires users to register with their real names per government policy, it’s not a stretch to imagine that one day, WeChat may fully replace state IDs.
The program was developed by the research institute of the Ministry of Public Security and Tencent’s WeChat team and is backed by banks and other government departments, including the China Construction Bank and the Guangzhou police station’s Nansha District branch.
WeChat has a reputation for being heavily monitored, despite Tencent’s attempts to convince users to “Rest assured, respecting user privacy has always been one of WeChat’s most important principles.” But even if the company says otherwise, on a technical level, it doesn’t offer users much protection against government surveillance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Shadow of the Colossus review”

What do we call Shadow of the Colossus, the soup-to-nuts update of Fumito Ueda’s 2005 masterpiece of the same name: a reboot, a remaster, a remake? The project from Austin, Texas-based Bluepoint Games warrants all of those labels on paper, at least.
As a result, the Shadow of the Colossus of 2018 makes a statement on what its creators deem fundamental, even foundational, to a video game.
There’s a conflict between what’s seen and what’s felt This belief, that better graphics make better games, has for decades been central to big video game publishers; it’s a belief that Sony itself extolled alongside the announcement of the PS4. Naturally, the company brass would assume a classic could be improved upon, or at least made more accessible, with a flashy paint job.
Are games disposable? Are they drafts that will be revised and revised, fulfilling some trend established by creators like George Lucas, who believe a story is timeless, but visuals, not so much? Is there a right way to preserve games? In recent years, we’ve seen high-definition re-releases, full remakes and backward compatibility on new consoles.
Even the latter, for all its purity, is imperfect: As Microsoft boasts about backward-compatible games on Xbox One, your favorite Xbox and Xbox 360 games will run better than they did before.
On the other hand, Shadow of the Colossus’ focus – you have one goal: slay the beasts – stands in contrast with how modern games have changed, distancing themselves from their predecessors.
As wonderful a game as this is, the lesson mustn’t be that we need more games that look like this Colossus – rather, that we need games that feel like it: a decade later, pushing against what we expect from games, warts and all.
All screenshots in this review were captured on a PS4 Pro, using the game’s Performance setting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Dark Art of Stealing from Self-Checkouts”

When Voucher Codes Pro, a company that offers coupons to internet shoppers, surveyed 2,634 people, nearly 20 percent admitted to having stolen at the self-checkout in the past.
More than half of those people said they gamed the system because detection by store security was unlikely.
After auditing 1 million self-checkout transactions over the course of a year, totaling $21 million in sales, they found that nearly $850,000 worth of goods left the store without being scanned and paid for.
The Leicester researchers concluded that the ease of theft is likely inspiring people who might not otherwise steal to do so.
As one retail employee told the researchers, “People who traditionally don’t intend to steal when I buy 20, I can get five for free.” The authors further proposed that retailers bore some blame for the problem.
Perhaps it’s not surprising that some people steal from machines more readily than from human cashiers.
“There is NO MORAL ISSUE with stealing from a store that forces you to use self checkout, period. THEY ARE CHARGING YOU TO WORK AT THEIR STORE.” Barbara Staib, the director of communications of the National Association for Shoplifting Prevention, believes that self-checkouts tempt people who are already predisposed to shoplifting, by allowing them to rationalize their behavior.
Frank Farley, a psychologist at Temple University, says that many supermarket thieves have what he calls Type-T personalities: “Shopping can be quite boring because it’s such a routine, and this is a way to make the routine more interesting. These can be risk-taking, stimulation-seeking people.” According to this theory, some Type Ts become base.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Plan to Build a Gold Mine on a Seismic Fault in Greece”

The roadside graffiti is an indicator of this being an epicenter of ongoing environmental and economic tensions with Canadian mining company Eldorado Gold, which is in the process of operating three copper-ore and gold mines in the region.
At the same time, some residents are upset about the destruction they and many experts say the mines would wreak through deforestation, large-scale drilling, water contamination, and the building of a hazardous waste dam atop an active seismic fault.
A year later, riot police used extraordinary force during local gold mine protests.
As Greece’s largest foreign investor, it makes sense Eldorado would invest in Halkidiki, where an estimated 33 million tons of gold have been extracted since the 6th century B.C. Alexander the Great once opened small mines here; the region is rich in lucrative materials like copper, silver, gold, lead, and zinc.
Giorgos said he worked in the local mine for 27 years, back when it was first owned by Greece’s AEXEP, and later by Canada’s TVX. The mine was much smaller in those days, he said.
In 2003, Greece’s highest court ruled that any economic gain from a large-scale gold mine in Halkidiki did not outweigh any related environmental damage.
The current left-wing Syriza government was in staunch opposition to any mine expansions when it came into power in 2015, but had to change its tune as the International Monetary Fund, European Central Bank, and European Commission, or troika, forced Greece to streamline investment processes, including environmental assessments.
In the six years since its initial purchase, Eldorado’s Greek subsidiary, Hellas Gold S.A., has cleared over 300 hectares of forests to open a large-scale open-pit mine in Skouries, an underground mine Olympia and Stratoni, and a mining deposit in Mavres Petres.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Retirement: Where Could You Get Safe 6% Income?”

For our examples, we would assume that our typical investor needs $40,000 of annual income from the investment portfolio.
To be able to live off 4% of the portfolio, usually one requires a large portfolio size.
For a DGI portfolio of solid, large-cap, blue-chip companies, it takes something around 5+ years before it can start throwing 4-5% or higher income.
If you mix in a few REITs and higher yielding but relatively safe stocks such as AT&T and Verizon, you could have a starting yield of 4%. Nonetheless, it is generally advisable that you start a DGI portfolio a few years before you actually plan to retire and reinvest the dividends until you actually retire, to be able to draw 4 to 5% income in retirement.
If someone has a $2 Million portfolio and his or her income needs are only 2% of the portfolio size, we think a DGI strategy would be great and cover all bases.
On smaller portfolios, it becomes difficult to raise sufficient income solely by index investing or even DGI strategy.
The stock portfolio presented here is a model portfolio for demonstration purposes; however, the author holds many of the same stocks in his personal portfolio.
Other portfolios such as 8% Income CEF portfolio, 6% Income Risk-Adjusted portfolio, 401(k)-IRA-Conservative portfolio, Sector-Rotation ETF portfolio, and High-Growth BTF portfolio are part of our SA Marketplace service High Income DIY Portfolios.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These Seven To-Do List Mistakes Could Be Derailing Your Productivity”

Mistakes on your to-do list could be putting your workday in jeopardy, say experts.
“A to-do list is a road map for your day,” says Paula Rizzo, author of Listful Thinking: Using Lists to Be More Productive, Successful, and Less Stressed.
Aspirational tasks, like writing a book, don’t belong on a to-do list; instead, create a separate bucket list.
A good to-do list should be a priority list, says productivity coach Nancy Gaines.
People often write vague notes on a to-do list, but it can be difficult to take action if you have to stop and think how to proceed, says Maura Thomas, author of Personal Productivity Secrets.
If you have 10 minutes to get something done and a vague to-do list, you’ll waste time trying to reconnect with each item on the list and remember what it means.
Having a full calendar that does not include the actions on your full to-do list is another mistake, says Katie Mazzocco, author of Revolutionary Productivity: How to Maximize Your Time, Impact, and Income in Your Small Business.
“If you have a full calendar and a full to-do list that aren’t connected, you’ll never have time to take action on your to-do list, short of robbing yourself of sleep, family time, weekend relaxation, or vacation.”

The orginal article.