Summary of “101 Good Habits for a Productive, Prosperous, Happy Life.”

Who possess a repertoire of really good habits, success and goal achievement is more automatic and easily realized.
Good habits are going to propel you forward while those pesky bad habits are going to hold you back.
Of course, this isn’t just about building the good habits, but also about disrupting your bad habits.
Disruption is how you block the electrical impulses to continually wield those bad habits.
Developing good habits takes a significant amount of work.
How many or the habits from the list do you possess? Are there some bad habits that have been holding you back from getting ahead in life? Take a careful inventory of your habits and do your best to implement the right habits to achieve your dreams.
If you follow along with some of the best habits for achieving your goals, you’ll increase your chances of not becoming just another statistic.
Whether you believe in God, Allah, Buddha or the spiritual oneness that binds us all, the following spirituality habits are some of the best that you can implement to help keep you centered and at peace.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”Leave the crown in the garage”: What I’ve learned from a decade of being PepsiCo’s CEO”

I’ve faced many challenges over the years – as we all do – but with inspiration from family, friends, colleagues and other sources of wisdom, I’ve learned many lessons along the way.
Though it would be impossible to name all the lessons I’ve learned, I’ve come up with seven critical lessons for running a Fortune 50 company in the 21st century.
That’s lesson number one: Come up with a vision that not only reflects the direction of a company, but moves people, inspires people to make it a reality.
My second lesson is to think hard about your time horizon.
He replied, “Because you’re trying to lead when you need to follow.” Then he added, “If you learned to follow, you’d be a better leader. And it would make you a better dancer.” What a profound lesson.
That’s what my seventh lesson is all about.
These are the seven critical lessons I wanted to share with you.
These seven lessons translate into the seven characteristics of a great leader: Vision.

The orginal article.

Summary of “As Amazon’s Influence Grows, Marketers Scramble to Tailor Strategies”

Dooley Tombras, the firm’s executive vice president, said it sent products to influential Amazon reviewers in hopes of soliciting positive feedback and conducted “Guerrilla sampling,” like holding events “Where we’re handing out a product and we’ve got teams there with iPads and we’re encouraging people to write reviews of a product on the spot.”
Brands can pay Amazon to customize the middle of pages with large advertorial images and information – which in the protein powder’s case included photos of men working out; a recipe for “Birthday cake pancakes” made with the chocolate-flavored whey; and a chart featuring six of its other products, like Micronized Creatine Powder, explaining when and how they should be consumed.
Amazon has long been an online shopping behemoth, but marketers now know it is playing an increasingly important role in how people discover and learn about their goods.
“E-commerce is nothing new, it’s been going on for decades, and Amazon is nothing new, it’s been successful for decades – but now they are becoming much more of a dominant force in brand discovery,” said Sarah Hofstetter, the chief executive of the digital agency 360i.Its quick success in categories like apparel and the popularity of voice search emphasized that, Ms. Hofstetter said.
The agencies said in the release that more than half of United States consumers now started online product searches on Amazon, compared with 28 percent on search engines and 16 percent on retailer websites.
In an interview in Cannes, France, last month, Mr. Sorrell said his firm wanted to do more with clients and Amazon, but noted there were major questions around how brands might gain access its customer data and compete on voice search.
Amazon Media Group, the company’s growing advertising division, has been looking to assuage such concerns while touting new ways marketers can reach people on Amazon.
“We can help a brand if they’re selling their products on Amazon understand when a customer is exposed to an ad and, when they clicked on an ad, if they bought something, and then we can help them tailor their marketing messages and their creative to each different step.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stories you’ve never heard”

With New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady celebrating his 40th birthday on Thursday, we’ve tracked down a collection of confidants to tell their favorite behind-the-scenes stories about the QB. The untold tales span a frustrated 4-year-old golfer, a ruthless enforcer on the intramural basketball court, an unexpected beer-chugging wonder … and everything in between.
Mike Vrabel, Patriots linebacker, 2001-08: “My indoctrination to the goal-line [offense]: I had maybe caught a couple touchdowns and was feeling pretty good about myself, and we went to practice one day and I broke free on a crossing route or something like that. So I start yelling, ‘Tom! Tom! Tom!’ and I’m waving my hands. But he doesn’t throw it to me. I come back, and we’re in the huddle when he says, ‘Mikey, if you ever wave your f–in’ hands and ask for the ball again, I’ll never throw it to you. I know who’s open. I’m the quarterback, I’ll throw it to whoever the f– I want!’ That was the last time I ever called for the ball.”
Rodney Harrison, Patriots safety, 2003-08: “This was when I first got to New England, we had become friends and we were in the weight room. I show up around 6:30 in the morning and he says to me, ‘Good afternoon!’ So the next day, I get the hint, and come in 15 minutes earlier. Same thing: He says, ‘Good afternoon!’ Then the next day it’s 5:45 in the morning, and he makes sure to say it twice: ‘Good afternoon! Good afternoon!’ So I make it at 5:30 the next day and before he could say anything to me, I looked at him and said, ‘Man, I don’t give a damn what you say, Tom, I’m not coming in earlier than 5:30!’ We both laughed at that.”
Matt Cassel, Patriots quarterback, 2005-08: “He’s never willing to give up a rep. I remember when I was in practice, Josh [McDaniels] would be like, ‘All right Cassel, get in there. You’re up.’ And as soon as he put me in, Tom would be like, ‘No, I want to get this one.’ I remember having this conversation with him. He said, ‘Look, as you play this game, you never want to see somebody else doing your job, because everybody is good in this league.'”.
Bill Belichick, Patriots head coach, 2000-present: “When we played golf at Pebble Beach two years ago, on the sixth hole, it’s a big cliff. He’s literally standing out there on the ledge, trying to hit the ball. The caddie is holding him so he won’t like tumble 300 feet to his death into the Pacific Ocean. It’s a golf ball. But I think that’s kind of the competitiveness of Tom. I’m sure there’s a picture of it. I’m thinking to myself, ‘What the hell are you doing?'”.
Kevin Faulk, Patriots running back, 2000-11: “Tom was always businesslike, but he also liked to have fun. So one day, we all walk into the locker room and three tires from Matt Cassel’s car are all at his locker. Nobody knows where the fourth tire is, but Cassel’s car, in the parking lot, is on blocks. They were playing pranks on each other, it was Tom who did it, and Cassel sort of looked around and said, ‘What can I do, man?’ Well, a couple of offensive linemen decided that they wanted to help. They wanted to leave Mr. Brady a little treat for when he was going home from practice. So Brady gets to his car and what does he find: It is filled with a bunch of packing peanuts.”
Sebastian Vollmer, Patriots offensive tackle, 2009-16: “I’m always impressed, because when you walk into that locker room, everyone knows who Tom Brady is. But he introduces himself to every rookie: ‘Hey, my name is Tom Brady. I play quarterback.’ It’s not like, ‘I’m the guy.’ He’s not arrogant. Just humble from the perspective of, ‘I don’t expect you to know me, I am going to prove to you I can play.'”.
Rodney Harrison, Patriots safety, 2003-08: “When we were down in the Super Bowl at Houston [in 2004], it was practice and it was a competitive one. The defense had its way with Tom that day – knocking down balls, forcing incomplete passes – and we were all pumped up. Then I stepped in front and picked Tom off, running down the field, high-stepping, talking trash. When I come back, he started chasing me, throwing footballs at me, yelling obscenities at me. It was unbelievable. Here we are at the Super Bowl, about to play the biggest game of our lives, and this dude is mad – and then wouldn’t talk to me for a day and a half – because I picked him off.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Canada became an education superpower”

At university level, Canada has the world’s highest proportion of working-age adults who have been through higher education – 55% compared with an average in OECD countries of 35%.Migrant students.
Canada does not even really have a national education system, it is based on autonomous provinces and it is hard to think of a bigger contrast between a city state such as Singapore and a sprawling land mass such as Canada.
So how has Canada overtaken so many other countries in education?
Reas Schleicher, the OECD’s education director, says Canada’s “Big uniting theme is equity”.
Prof David Booth, from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto, highlights Canada’s “Strong base in literacy”.
Prof John Jerrim, of the UCL Institute of Education in London, says that Canada’s high league table ranking reflects the narrow socio-economic gap in school results.
This has been a bumper year for education in Canada.
As Canada marks its 150th anniversary, it can claim the status of an education superpower.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If SoundCloud Disappears, What Happens to Its Music Culture?”

In a recent Times article, my colleague Jon Caramanica chronicled the rise of ”SoundCloud rap,” a subgenre of rap released primarily on the streaming service that he described as ”the most vital and disruptive new movement in hip-hop thanks to rebellious music, volcanic energy and occasional acts of malevolence.
The death of SoundCloud would mean more than the sunsetting of a service: It could mean the erasure of a decade of internet sound culture, says Jace Clayton, a musician and the author of ”Uproot: Travels in 21st-Century Music and Digital Culture.
The struggling service shut down, and all the music uploaded and shared to it was lost, including what Clayton recalls to be a very eclectic subset of black Chicago house music.
SoundCloud always let me get lost in a warren of music that I’d never heard – or even heard of – before.
SoundCloud took a community-first approach to building its business, prioritizing finding artists to post on its service over making deals with music labels to license their music, the approach taken by Spotify.
The music industry was still in the process of adapting to a digital ecosystem when SoundCloud emerged; illegal file-sharing was rampant.
Generally speaking, the business of music streaming is treacherous at best: Consumers don’t seem to want to pay big money for access to digital music services, so companies must keep the fees low.
The most popular artists – Rihanna, Future, Drake – are all releasing music exclusively through the streaming service that pays them to do so; or in the case of BeyoncĂ© and Jay-Z, through the streaming service they own, Tidal.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Some Pretty Cool Science Is Gonna Happen During The Eclipse”

The sky will seem to dance, four other planets will emerge from their daytime hiding spots behind the sun’s glare, and millions of Americans will experience their first total solar eclipse.
All the while, scientists who study eclipses will be buzzing around their equipment to take the measure of the sun, its atmosphere and its interaction with our own atmosphere.
The moon is about 400 times smaller than the sun, but the sun is about 400 times farther away, so they line up almost exactly.
The sun streams radiation and charged particles through a wind that it constantly blows in all directions, and while we know the solar wind originates in the corona, scientists are not sure exactly how, or why.
Typically, a coronagraph covers an area around 1.4 times the radius of the sun, obscuring arguably the most important region – the one closest to the sun’s surface.
Scientific instruments can observe coronal structures, measure material escaping from the sun at speeds of 1,000 miles per second, and capture instabilities in the sun’s plasma and magnetism that would otherwise be outshone.
Scientists will fly in at least three airplanes, including a National Science Foundation jet that will measure the sun in infrared.
Until it reaches the sun in a few years, an eclipse offers the most intimate possible window into the star’s behavior.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Chronic Fatigue Syndrome’ Severity Linked To Several Proteins Of Inflammation”

Many patients see the name “Chronic fatigue syndrome” as trivializing and misleading, giving the impression that they’re simply tired or depressed.
Now, the Stanford researchers have linked ME/CFS to variations in certain cytokines, immune-signaling proteins, that track with illness severity.
Out of 51 cytokines investigated via sophisticated fluorescence-based testing, only two of the cytokines differed, in their total concentrations, between the ME/CFS and control groups.
Levels of 17 of the cytokines varied dramatically between the patients with mild versus severe ME/CFS symptoms.
According to Dr. Anthony L. Komaroff, a Harvard internist and epidemiologist who has written a commentary to accompany the study, “For many years medical scientists have speculated that the symptoms of ME/CFS might be caused by cytokines, molecules that the immune system use to wage war against foreign invaders of the body. Past studies have shown high levels of many cytokines but it was not clear that these high levels were causing symptoms.”
What the latest research shows, Komaroff tells Shots, is that “Levels of many cytokines do correlate with symptoms: The higher the blood level, the worse the symptoms. That supports the theory that the cytokines are a cause of the symptoms.”
Two classic laboratory measures of inflammation are sedimentation rate – the ability of red blood cells to clump together, which isn’t a factor in ME/CFS – and C-reactive protein, which reflects levels of a single cytokine that wasn’t one of those linked to severity in this study.
The multidisciplinary Stanford team is now working on developing a panel that could be used commercially, that would test for around five of the 17 cytokines and would likely involve the doctor first classifying patients by severity in order to interpret the results.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?”

More comfortable in their bedrooms than in a car or at a party, today’s teens are physically safer than teens have ever been.
Teens who visit social-networking sites every day but see their friends in person less frequently are the most likely to agree with the statements “A lot of times I feel lonely,” “I often feel left out of things,” and “I often wish I had more good friends.” Teens’ feelings of loneliness spiked in 2013 and have remained high since.
Teens who spend more time on social media also spend more time with their friends in person, on average-highly social teens are more social in both venues, and less social teens are less so.
At the generational level, when teens spend more time on smartphones and less time on in-person social interactions, loneliness is more common.
In 2011, for the first time in 24 years, the teen suicide rate was higher than the teen homicide rate.
The teen suicide rate was even higher in the 1990s, long before smartphones existed.
What’s the connection between smartphones and the apparent psychological distress this generation is experiencing? For all their power to link kids day and night, social media also exacerbate the age-old teen concern about being left out.
Two national surveys show that teens who spend three or more hours a day on electronic devices are 28 percent more likely to get less than seven hours of sleep than those who spend fewer than three hours, and teens who visit social-media sites every day are 19 percent more likely to be sleep deprived.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Wireless mesh networks explained”

You would be forgiven for thinking that wireless mesh networking is just another marketing bullet point for new Wi-Fi routers, a phrase coined to drive up prices without delivering benefits.
Mesh networks are resilient, self-configuring, and efficient.
Mesh networks solve a particular problem: covering a relatively large area, more than about 1,000 square feet on a single floor, or a multi-floor dwelling or office, especially where there’s no ethernet already present to allow easier wired connections of non-mesh Wi-Fi routers and wireless access points.
The concept of mesh networks first appeared in the 1980s in military experiments, and it became commercially available in the 1990s.
Mesh networking treats each base station as a node that exchanges information continuously about network conditions with all adjacent nodes across the entire set.
Mesh networks don’t retransmit all the data passing through among a set of base stations.
Luma Home, Inc. The principle behind all wireless networking is “How do I transmit this number of bits in the smallest number of microseconds and get off and let someone else use it?” explains Matthew Gast, former chair of the IEEE 802.11 committee that sets specs used by Wi-Fi. Mesh networks manage this better than WDS. In some cases, Gast notes, a mesh node might send a packet of data to just one other node; in others, a weak signal and other factors might route the packet through other nodes to reach the destination base station to which the destination wireless device is connected.
Because you don’t have to plan where mesh nodes go, mesh systems automatically reconfigure as you add nodes.

The orginal article.