Summary of “Nine Skills Worth Teaching Your Children to Build Personal and Financial Independence”

I came up with a healthy list of skills that I felt I could help build in my children with the end goal of helping them to develop into financially and personally independent adults.
As with the previous article, I combined them down into nine skills that can be built in older children, preteens, and teenagers, each of which sets them on a path to financial and personal independence from their parents.
What’s the value in this? If you are a parent, the independence of your children has a huge bearing on your financial future.
Here are nine skills that you should be helping your children and teenagers to master, along with two or three specific tactics for bringing out those skills.
How do you help your children develop project management and nascent time management skills?
Putting your children in a position to intimately understand the connection between hard work and reward is a key part in helping them build a work ethic.
How do you help your children develop these kinds of professional skills?
Here are two simple strategies you can use to build this skill in your children.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How People with Different Conflict Styles Can Work Together”

Neither style is better or worse, and your default style is probably due to several factors: your past experiences with conflict, the conventions of the culture you’re from or work in, the organizational context, and even gender norms.
While each of us generally has a preferred approach, it’s rare for a person to avoid or seek out conflict all the time.
Still, it’s useful to know what your natural tendency is and, when you get into a conflict with someone else, to put some thought into the other person’s style.
If you’re a seeker and the other person is an avoider, how should you handle the situation? And is all hope of reaching a resolution lost if you’re both avoiders?
How does he typically communicate and how does he prefer to be communicated with? Is she more of a straight shooter who tells it like it is, or does she tend to beat around the bush? If you frequently work with the person you’re having the conflict with, you may already be familiar with their style.
It may be that you’re fighting with an overseas colleague whom you see in person only at annual meetings, or your conflict may be with a manager in a different department who sits in another building.
You’ll want to consider how your styles interact.
One of you needs to take the lead. Say directly, “I know neither of us likes conflict, but instead of ignoring the problem, what can we do about it?” Do your best to draw the other person out in a sensitive, thoughtful way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is Surfing More Sport or Religion?”

Nature is God, she says, the sea holy water, and surfing a meditation-a comparison that would have likely resonated with the poet Philip Larkin, who wrote, “If I were called in / To construct a religion / I should make use of water.” While pop culture and the subculture of surfing have both contributed to the mystical reputation of wave-riding, psychology and neuroscience may play an even bigger role, with researchers finding that water is a key ingredient-if not the key ingredient-in experiences people often call holy.
Look at the brain of a surfer or swimmer in an fMRI, Nichols said, and you’ll see a more distributed set of points, a more spherical thinking, than when you’re, say, solving a math problem, which takes more prefrontal cortex power.
Housman isn’t a surf jock arguing for more wave pools and more Olympics.
“I’d push back on surfing being called a sport alone,” he said, leaving the activity’s definition open-ended.
His point which many surfers would echo, is to let surfing be surfing.
Steven Kotler’s book West of Jesus captured this tension well: “The irony of it was that most of the people considered surfing a religious experience and that their religious experience was being ruined by all the others surfing for the same reason.”
So why does surfing appear to be so much more freighted with spiritual meaning than other water sports? One key distinction is the structure and pace of the activity.
As Housman suggested, surfing is not unique in its ability to give people more happiness, well-being, and awe.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Decide Which Tasks to Delegate”

Our “Angel” of favorite tasks and projects is someone else’s devil, and vice versa.
Very straightforward tasks can be handled by anyone but you.
You can easily step in when the task is 80% complete and give approval, oversight and/or direction on next steps.
Terrible At: Tasks that not only do not fall into your strengths, but an area where you feel unequipped.
Time Sensitive: Tasks that are time-sensitive but compete with other priorities; there isn’t enough time to do them all at once, so you delegate an important and time-sensitive task so that it can be done in parallel to your other project-based deadlines.
One of the central differentiators for determining what to delegate is checking in frequently to examine what’s on your plate and ask: What can you and only you do? How can you delegate the rest?
Your assignment: Over the course of the next two weeks, make a note of tasks that fall under the 6 T’s above.
For more ideas on what to delegate, check out this list of 75+ tasks I’ve delegated in the last year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Best Tips for Beating Procrastination”

My trick is to imagine my future self and to do things for this future self – “Connie of the Future.” I picture how grateful Connie of the Future will be if I’ve laid out work clothes for next week, or done food prep for that night in the morning, or answered an email that Connie of the Present doesn’t feel like doing.
Tim.Best of Smarter Living How to Survive a Lavish Wedding: One of the main ways to survive a lavish wedding is to let any embarrassing moments slide off you like good caviar.
How to Find the Right Therapist: To find The One, the author needed to date around and swipe her way through therapists.
How Well Do You Know The World?: These photos are all selected from spots that made our Places to Go in 2017 list.
How to Raise a Reader: From the moment you’re expecting your first child, you are bombarded with messages about the importance of reading.
Aid a grieving friend by offering specific ways you can help.
How to Survive a Lavish Wedding: One of the main ways to survive a lavish wedding is to let any embarrassing moments slide off you like good caviar.
Here are some ways to reduce your impact when you fly.5 Cheap(ish) Things That Could Disproportionately Improve Your Life: You don’t always have to spend big to see a big impact.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 1 Thing You Need for Success, According to Michael Jordan and Tony Robbins”

In addition to both being multimillionaires and having thousands of raving fans, Tony Robbins and Michael Jordan have something big in common: high standards.
Robbins frequently talks about his own high standards as well.
“Every event has to be better. Talk to anyone who has been to our events five, 10 years, some of our trainers. They’ll say, ‘I don’t know how he does it. He always finds a way to make it better.’ That’s not an ego thing, that’s a standard in me. I have to find the way,” he said.
“Lasting change is different than a goal. You don’t always get a goal, but you get your standards.” He advises that a key to raising your standards is to change shoulds into musts.
Tony has identified three keys to develop and execute against high standards.
“You have competition every day because you set such high standards for yourself that you have to go out every day and live up to that.” -Michael Jordan.
“Results don’t come without action. If you identify yourself in a new way and own that every day, then that becomes the standard on how you’ll live. You’ll find a way to make that standard real,” says Robbins.
“Whatever you really want, wants don’t get met consistently, standards do.” -Tony Robbins.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Rich People Do That Poor People Don’t”

“He that is good for making excuses is seldom good for anything else.”- Benjamin FranklinWhen the founder of Pinterest was first working to build popularity around his app, he was what some might call relentlessly resourceful - persistent in his journey towards success, while having the ability to quickly and cleverly overcome obstacles and difficulties.
At the time, Pinterest wasn’t worth the $5 billion that it is today, nor did it have anywhere close to its massive following of 150 million monthly users.
In order to attract new users, Pinterest’s founder would sneak into Apple stores and set Pinterest as the default landing page on their display devices.
When customers would visit Apple to test out a Macbook or the latest iPhone, the first thing they would see after opening the screen was Pinterest.
The majority of people in this position would either make excuses or give up the moment their big idea wasn’t gaining traction - blaming their environment, blaming themselves or blaming others.
Rich people are relentlessly resourceful, they always figure out a way to succeed and make more money, regardless of their circumstances.
When rich people are dealt a bad hand, they don’t blame the dealer, they shut the hell up and still figure out a way to win.
If you want to be rich, face every one of life’s challenges with these words in mind.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Our 2 Best Tips for Dealing With Picky Eaters”

First, you want your kid to eat a wide variety of foods, because that ups the chances they’ll consume healthier and more nutrient-rich fare, rather than just chicken nuggets and fries.
Kids who are adventurous eaters growing up, tend to be more adventurous eaters as adults.
Being an adventurous eater makes life easier, smoother, and more fun, allowing him or her to confidently dine in a variety of homes, in a variety of countries, without being the kind of priggish person who turns their nose up at unfamiliar dishes and orders the most Americanized item on the menu.
How can parents nip picky eating in the bud while their kids are still malleable?
Institute the “Try one bite of everything; eat as much as you’d like of what you like” rule.
Meal kit services like Blue Apron – in which you get a weekly box of ingredients to cook into meals at home – work against picky eating in a couple of ways.
When you have children that are picky eaters, you tend to keep cooking the same meals – the ones you know they like – over and over again.
So there you go: our 2 best tips for dealing with picky eaters, as field-tested in the McKay household.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Snopes Faces an Ugly Legal Battle”

In the summer of that year, Bardav had entered into an agreement with a newish San Diego company called Proper Media to “Provide content and website development services as well as advertising sales and trafficking” to Snopes.
The San Diego Union Tribune visited the Proper Media offices, out of which Snopes employees were working.
In a story as old as media, the site’s editors worried that the co-owners didn’t understand what Snopes was, and that they only wanted to juice its revenues, so they could sell it.
On March 10, in an action that Proper Media disputes, David Mikkelson canceled the contract that had been in place governing interactions between Bardav and Proper Media.
Proper Media’s lawyer, Karl Kronenberger, told me that they’ve alleged that “David Mikkelson has engaged in gross financial, technical, and corporate mismanagement.” Mikkelson told me that Proper Media “Continue to hold themselves out as authorized advertising representatives. They have continued to collect the revenue and they have not paid us any advertising revenue.”
Mikkelson is seeking an injunction to force Proper Media to hand over control of the site.
Proper Media is seeking to remove Mikkelson as a director of Bardav.
If a resolution to the dispute isn’t reached soon, it could mean the end of both Proper Media and Snopes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hedge Fund Uses Algae to Reap 21% Return”

Hedge fund manager Desmond Lun’s 21 percent average return over the last four years springs from an unlikely source – a petri dish of algae.
Computational biologists like Lun are late to the quant wave that’s upending hedge funds.
Lun, who has a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, spent a decade developing models that decipher how genes interact and influence each other – and published 18 academic papers related to predicting cellular behavior.
As the genome project produced reams of data, Lun saw an opportunity to break ground in computational biology and in 2006 joined the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, a crossroads for scientists and hedge fund managers.
There Lun met senior computational biologist Nick Patterson, a former cryptographer who had spent a decade at Renaissance Technologies making mathematical models.
Another Lun colleague, genomic researcher Jade Vinson, left Broad for the same pioneering quant hedge fund for 10 years.
Lun, who was born in Hong Kong, splits his time between his firm in Pennsylvania and lab at Rutgers, where he’s undertaken an ambitious long-term project: creating computer models that predict how cells behave, using data from blue-green algae and other sources.
The models allow Lun to re-engineer genes for useful purposes: he has modified E. coli for production of bio-fuel for transportation.

The orginal article.