Summary of “Andre Iguodala Is What Makes the Warriors Truly Unstoppable”

Golden State is unbeatable when he is on his game; that’s the version of Iguodala the Warriors will need to beat the Rockets in the Western Conference finals.
He’s no longer quite as fast as he was in his prime, but he makes up for it with an astounding basketball IQ. Iguodala is almost always in the right position.
There’s nothing flashy about his game: Iguodala is a patient player who understands his role, reads the floor, and makes the simple play.
My favorite Iguodala play from this year’s playoffs happened during Game 4 against New Orleans, a sequence that topped off a 17-4 opening run that put the Warriors firmly back in control of the series.
Iguodala caught a glimpse of the future in 2013 during a playoff series against the Warriors as a part of a 57-win Nuggets team.
When Iguodala hit free agency that offseason, he recruited the Warriors as much as they recruited him.
“We said, ‘Do we have to sell you on anything?’ He said, ‘Look, I feel like this is the place I want to play.’ He was looking at a team that was financially strapped with arguably no way to get him.” Iguodala waited out Dwight Howard, whom the Warriors were also pursuing, refusing offers for more money as they figured out how to clear cap space to sign him.
The best version of Iguodala makes his stars better and the other team’s stars worse.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These Shipping Containers Have Farms Inside”

Los Angeles startup Local Roots retrofits 40-foot-long shipping containers, turning them into “TerraFarms” that yield as many leafy greens as five acres of farmland-only faster, using as little as 1 percent of the water.
The company leases TerraFarms to wholesalers, restaurant chains, and SpaceX. The United Nations is preparing to field-test them, too.
Chief Executive Officer Eric Ellestad, a venture capitalist who’s raised about $11 million for Local Roots, says he’ll stand by the taste of the greens grown in the former containers, no salad dressing required.
Twenty-five gallons of water a day is all each TerraFarm’s hydroponics needs.
To maximize water efficiency and recirculation, hundreds of sensors track such factors as airflow and water temperature and feed the data to TerraFarms staffers for real-time tweaking.
Four thousand heads of lettuce can come from a single TerraFarm every 10 to 12 days.
Overhead. Local Roots buys old containers from the Port of Los Angeles for about $5,000 and retrofits them for more than double that.
Customers place the container farms at food distribution centers so they can cut out days or even weeks of produce travel time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Poke Bowls Could Be The Next Convenience Food. Here’s Why.”

These ready-to-eat poke bowls are the latest step in the Hawaiian dish’s quick march on the mainland from fine dining appetizer to mass-market convenience food.
It’s a journey that’s been expedited by Acme Smoked Fish, a Brooklyn-based specialty food company that dreamed up a twist that gave poke a 30-day shelf-life recipe – swapping out raw fish for smoked fish.
Acme, whose smoked fish products already can be found in supermarkets around the country, launched its nouveau poke bowls in supermarkets like Costco and Kroger about a year ago.
After the mainstreaming of sushi in the US, fine dining chefs started introducing poke, which sparked the current wave of fast-casual poke joints and roaming food trucks.
There are even poke bowl franchises: Pokéworks, which was founded in 2015 and now has nearly 20 locations, plans to have more than 100 locations in two years and Sweetcatch Poke is franchising.
Jason McVearry, co-founder of LA’s Poké-Poké said, “I wouldn’t call smoked fish and rice from a vending machine poke…at all.” Steve Dizon, who opened his San Francisco poke food truck Bonito Poke last year, raised an eyebrow at the mention of smoked fish.
Lisa Skolnick, an LA native who now lives in Kansas City, said she found Acme’s Blue Hill Bay poke bowls in Costco, where they sold in a pack of two for about $15. “I got my kids hooked on them,” she said.
Unfazed by apparent poke shortages in Kansas City, Acme’s Schiff has been actively pitching the company’s poke bowl to gas stations and convenience stores.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is your kid grumpy, stubborn or defiant? This might be the reason”

One mother’s investigation into why her child was acting so stubborn led to a surprising discovery: He was discouraged.
The root of an at-times defiant, difficult child: discouragementRudolf Dreikurs, a 20th century psychologist who focused much of his work on parenting, observed that, “A misbehaving child is a discouraged child.”
Sometimes a child who is misbehaving frequently is struggling with discouragement, 20th century psychologist Rudolf Dreikurs found.
After struggling to understand why her very smart child refused to do his homework, one mom finally asks the right question.
This is one of the hardest places to pull a kid out of because the child’s behavior makes adults feel the same emotions that the child is feeling: hopeless, helpless, and inadequate.
These uncomfortable emotions are frequently masked by the child with defiance and lack of motivation.
Tips for encouraging your child, combating defiant behaviorPulling our child out of this hole takes creativity and patience.
Break a task down into small steps and ask your child to just do one step at a time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Bankrupt Ideology of Business School”

In his 2017 book on business school The Golden Passport, which focuses on Harvard, Duff McDonald names this as the central failure of today’s MBA programs.
MBA students may be dealing into the financial system of a New Gilded Age, but our social policy positions reflect a far more progressive era.
Not once have I heard a discussion of unions while in business school.
Students become like major corporations that sponsor Pride floats for employees or air heartening commercials of workers’ biracial families, then adopt practices that make those peoples’ lives more precarious.
Ask today’s business school student to describe the world of his or her dreams, and you’ll likely hear a description of the current system-just with more representative figures in positions of power.
In the 2016 presidential election, Harvard Business School polled students on their choice of candidate.
Privilege confers responsibility beyond itself, and one need not invoke pitchforks marching up the eighteenth fairway to show why MBA students have self-interested reasons for rethinking our ideology.
A more dynamic approach to addressing society’s problems, one which challenges students’ assumptions and moral priorities, might propel business schools to a more credible status in the public square, and allow them to finally become incubators of principled economic leaders rather than managers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Faced Off Against The World’s Best Chess Player. You Will Totally Believe What Happened Next.”

That’s how I found myself in Conference Room 8 in the headquarters of the U.N. last week playing chess against maybe the best chess player who has ever lived – and who also happens to be, at age 27, the reigning world champion and at the height of his awesome powers.
To my nervously trembling chagrin, they’d set up my chess board correctly and in the traditional fashion: I had only the one queen and the two rooks and so forth, and somehow it was deemed appropriate that Carlsen start with the identical and equal number of pieces.
Awaiting the world chess champion, I harbored no such idiotic delusions as I sat at an enormous horseshoe table, fretting and adjusting the pieces.
The event was a “Clock simul,” short for “Simultaneous exhibition with clocks,” in which each of us “Challengers” sat at our own boards while Carlsen, the “Exhibitor,” darted around the room, rarely taking more than a few seconds to make any move before moving on to his next victim.
It would soon defend my extant queen, which on the next move fled down the board to put Carlsen in check – I put Magnus Carlsen in check! I confess that for precisely 1.5 seconds I thought, “I am going to fucking win.”
I recorded Carlsen’s and my moves and later ran them through the powerful computer chess engine Stockfish, which evaluates every position and provides an estimate of who’s more likely to win.
Carlsen will face an American of somewhat greater chess note than I – Fabiano Caruana, the world No. 2 – in a match in November to defend his world championship crown.
I asked Carlsen if he considered his game against me to be part of his official world championship preparation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Pain and Pleasure of Breaking Up with My Cellphone”

My relationship with my phone was unhealthy in a lot of ways.
Philosophers Andy Clark and David Chalmers argued in their 1998 paper “The Extended Mind” that when tools help us with cognitive tasks, they become part of us-augmenting and extending our minds.
Today the idea that phones specifically are extensions of ourselves is receiving a lot of recent attention.
If I’m honest, much of what I did on my phone could be characterized as mindless.
While Clark celebrates the idea of innovative devices ushering in new possibilities for the mind, I find myself wondering what we might be giving up along the way.
Without my phone, I’m more fully myself, both in mind and body.
Now, more than ever, I know that looking at my phone is nothing compared to looking at my daughter while the room sways as I rock her to sleep, or how shades of indigo and orange pour in through the window and cast a dusky glow over her room, or the way her warm, milky breath escapes in tiny exhalations from her lips, or how the crickets outside sing their breathless, spring lullaby.
See, once I looked up from my phone, I remembered that each experience could be a symphony for the senses, just like it had been when I was a child and, thank God, there was no such thing as smartphones.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Credit score ratings: Is artificial intelligence scoring more fair?”

Credit in China is now in the hands of a company called Alipay, which uses thousands of consumer data points-including what they purchase, what type of phone they use, what augmented reality games they play, and their friends on social media-to determine a credit score.
The decisions made by algorithmic credit scoring applications are not only said to be more accurate in predicting risk than traditional scoring methods; its champions argue they are also fairer because the algorithm is unswayed by the racial, gender, and socioeconomic biases that have skewed access to credit in the past.
Of course, algorithmic credit scoring isn’t confined to emerging credit markets.
‘ As Schulman’s Money2020 speech suggests, algorithmic credit scoring is fueled by a desire to capitalize on the world’s ‘unbanked,’ drawing in billions of customers who, for lack of a traditional financial history, have thus far been excluded.
Algorithmic credit scores might seem futuristic, but these practices do have roots in credit scoring practices of yore.
Early credit agencies, for example, hired human reporters to dig into their customers’ credit histories.
One credit reporter from Buffalo, New York noted that “Prudence in large transactions with all Jews should be used,” while a reporter in Georgia described a liquor store he was profiling as “a low Negro shop.” Similarly, the Retailer Credit Company, founded in 1899 made use of information gathered by Welcome Wagon representatives to collate files on millions of Americans for the next 60 years.
Maybe then we can really see if these systems are giving credit where credit is due.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Moat Map – Stratechery by Ben Thompson”

The idea of a network effect is that an additional user increases the value of a good or service, and indeed all of these companies depend on network effects.
For Facebook the network effect that matters is users – a social network’s most important feature is whether your friends and family are using it.
Google has network effects of its own, but they are less about users and more about data: more people searching makes for better search results, because of the system Google has built to relentlessly harvest, analyze, and iterate on data.
Microsoft, befitting the point I made above about the expansiveness of its ecosystem, has the most “Externalized” network effect of all: there is very little about Windows, for example, that produces a network effect, but the ecosystem on top of Windows produced one of the greatest network effects ever.
Google similarly has internalized its network effects and commoditized its supplier base; however, given that its supply is from 3rd parties, the company does have more of a motivation to sustain those third parties.
I continue to believe that Apple’s moat could be even deeper had the company considered the above Moat Map: the network effects of a platform like iOS are mostly externalized, which means that highly differentiated suppliers are the best means to deepen the moat; unfortunately Apple for too long didn’t allow for suitable business models.
On the opposite side of the map are phone carriers in a post-iPhone world: carriers have strong network effects, both in terms of service as well as in the allocation of fixed costs.
In the case of Apple and apps, for example, I absolutely believe the company could have made different strategic choices had it fully appreciated the interaction between supplier differentiation and network effects.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We can’t forget about mass transit when we talk about the ‘future of transportation'”

For an event that was supposed to be about the “Future of transportation,” and part of a broader week-long festival about the “Future of everything,” it was oddly focused on personal – not public – transportation.
Typically, public transportation involves citywide systems that are complex and require a lot of money to be operated.
Fixing public transportation requires cooperation, planning, and the acceptance of the community.
Co/THHGntRMjC.- The New York Times May 12, 2018 Another problem, perhaps, is that the best ideas for improving public transportation are simply not flashy.
Neither does mobile ticketing, which seems like something that could have been widely implemented years ago, but has still not been adopted by some of the biggest transportation systems in the world.
It’s just not as exciting a solution as “Self-driving cars.” So if we’re going to have to drag our cities into the future, we need to be vigilant in remembering public transportation when we talk about the flashy stuff.
You can argue with the companies methods for expansion so far – and many are – but at least CEO Toby Sun mentioned public transportation.
The most salient point about public transportation came from someone who was showing off a product that isn’t even meant to move people: Sasha Hoffman, the COO of Piaggio Fast Forward, a robotics wing of Italian scooter giant Piaggio.

The orginal article.