Summary of “Colombians have for years grown amazing coffee. Finally, they’re drinking it.”

“We grew the best. But Colombians just weren’t used to drinking quality coffee.”
In Colombia, domestic consumption of coffee – which lagged global trends for years – is skyrocketing, with experts citing the wider availability of better-quality coffee as a major factor.
The good coffee has excited the senses of Colombians like Parra, who feel as if they are discovering their nation’s most famous export for the first time.
Colombians began to get a taste of premium coffee at least as far back as the early 2000s, when Juan Valdez – the now-global chain established by the national coffee federation – began opening cafes.
Coffee drinking per capita in Colombia still lags places such as the United States, France and Brazil.
“We discovered that Colombians – I mean all Colombians, including the working class – really wanted a good cup of coffee,” Gasca said.
His company, Azahar Coffee Co., opened its first Bogota coffee shop in a makeshift metal container in 2013.
Alejandro Gutierrez, chef at Salvo Patria – a Bogota restaurant that started as a coffee shop six years ago – recently tasted coffee grown and roasted in the battled-scarred Meta region.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 things mentally strong people don’t do”

If you feel like you’re constantly self-sabotaging yourself from achieving your goals, here are five key tips from “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do” to help you develop mental strength, conquer hurdles, and ditch your fears.
Don’t try to change things beyond your control – change your responses.
‘t do anything about the bad things that happen to you – and these are bound to occur, no matter how well-prepared you are.
The good news is that you can change your reflexes and responses when things go awry.
The reason so many people perceive change to be scary is not only because stability is comfortable, of course, but because we tend to assume a small change will overhaul our lives completely – which can only make us put it off all the more.
Become your own coach and take a close, objective look at your behavior in situations that you dislike or dread. Which habits are holding you back? Would you like to change them? Train yourself to shift these impulses one by one, while reminding yourself of the goals and values you want to stick to.
Don’t assume things that went wrong in the past will repeat themselves – forgive yourself and focus on making it better this time around.
You can check out all the key insights from “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do” on Blinkist.

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Summary of “The State Of Small Business Marketing”

Small businesses are adopting new marketing technologies.
Most small business owners already know the power of word of mouth marketing.
Few small business owners outsource their marketing.
54% of small businesses outsource graphic design and website design according to the 2017 WASP Barcode Technologies “State of Small Business Report.” But only 14% outsource their marketing, public relations, and advertising.
“This comes up again in other studies. In the InfusionSoft 2017″Small Business Marketing Trends Report, 70.8% of small businesses reported doing their marketing in-house.
Street Fight’s research on small business owners found that among business owners that either do their marketing themselves, delegate it to an internal team, or outsource it to an agency, the owners who do their marketing themselves are the least satisfied with their results.
So how bad is it? Well, 29% of small businesses still don’t have a website, according to Clutch’s third annual Small Business Survey.
It’s a good opportunity for them, too: Websites are regularly named as the most effective marketing channel for small to medium businesses.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to actually remove pesticides from your fruit”

If you google “How to get pesticides off fruit” you’re greeted by a flurry of blogs all promising the solution.
Water can remove some of the pesticides from a piece of fruit, so a basic scrub under the tap will help at least a little.
The extent to which this rather lackadaisical method works will depends on the fruit itself; some skins will more readily release the pesticides contained therein.
A solution of sodium bicarbonate and water can remove even more pesticides than water alone, provided you have more than a minute to spare.
In the experiments, Gala apples that were allowed to soak in baking soda for eight minutes had significantly reduced pesticide residue on the surface, and at 12-15 minutes there were virtually no pesticides left.
Their analysis relied on unproven theories about how pesticides might interact with one another, and thus has skewed results.
It’s not clear how worried you should be about those pesticides in the first place.
The allowable dose for methamidophos on bell peppers was 49.5 times higher than the actual amount of pesticide, and that was the fruit with the highest exposure.

The orginal article.

Summary of “CRISPR Bacon: Chinese Scientists Create Genetically Modified Low-Fat Pigs”

CRISPR Bacon: Chinese Scientists Create Genetically Modified Low-Fat Pigs : The Salt Scientists have used CRISPR, a new gene-editing technique, to create pigs that can keep their bodies warmer, burning more fat to produce leaner meat.
In a paper published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists report that they have created 12 healthy pigs with about 24 percent less body fat than normal pigs.
The scientists created low-fat pigs in the hopes of providing pig farmers with animals that would be less expensive to raise and would suffer less in cold weather.
Roberts doubts the Food and Drug Administration would approve a genetically modified pig for sale in the United States.
The scientists edited a mouse version of the gene into pig cells.
Next, scientists implanted the genetically modified cloned pig embryos into 13 female pigs.
Three of the female surrogate mother pigs became pregnant, producing 12 male piglets, the researchers report.
Tests on the piglets showed they were much better at regulating their body temperatures than normal pigs.

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Summary of “The problem of doctors’ salaries”

An unavoidable part of the high cost of U.S. health care is how much we pay doctors – twice as much on average as physicians in other wealthy countries.
Because our doctors are paid, on average, more than $250,000 a year, and more than 900,000 doctors in the country, that means we pay an extra $100 billion a year in doctor salaries.
There are two parts to the high pay received by our doctors relative to doctors elsewhere, both connected to the same cause.
The first is that our doctors get higher pay in every category of medical practice, including general practitioner.
Policymakers have a number of tools to use to introduce more competition, weaken the doctors’ cartel and get their pay more in line with counterparts elsewhere.
The admission of many more doctors would put downward pressure on the pay of doctors in the United States, as insurers would have a new pool of physicians to add to their networks who will accept somewhat lower compensation.
One more approach is being tested in Missouri, Kansas and Arkansas: While a doctor can’t practice independently without completing a U.S. residency program, those states recently passed laws allowing foreign-trained doctors to practice under the supervision of a U.S.-trained doctor.
Doctors generally enjoy a great deal of respect in society, and Americans tend not to think of their high salaries as part of the health care cost problem.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Action Bronson’s Expansive Appetites”

The best of the bunch is “F*ck, That’s Delicious,” a travel show hosted by the rapper and bon vivant Action Bronson, which will begin filming its third season next year.
Though Bronson has worked as a cook, and is familiar with the nuances and language of haute cuisine, he and his cronies refuse to acknowledge a chasm between high and low fare.
At a tasting, Bronson insists upon his own reading of a Georgian wine.
Bronson’s most obvious predecessor is Anthony Bourdain, the writer and former chef, whose latest series, “Parts Unknown,” airs on CNN. Bourdain jets off to exotic or otherwise underexplored sites, skulks about in a black leather jacket, pounds beers, and, as the show ends, delivers shrewd cultural commentary via voice-over.
Bronson takes his lasagna outside and stands on the sidewalk.
Batali seems vaguely disappointed by Bronson’s energy level.
A second Viceland series starring Bronson, “The Untitled Action Bronson Show,” premières this week.
The thirty-minute show-a kind of deranged “Emeril Live,” in which Bronson cooks and muses in the Munchies test kitchen, alongside special guests-will air Monday through Thursday at 11:30 P.M. I attended a recent taping in Brooklyn.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Blood-thinning drugs ‘can reduce risk of dementia by up to 48%'”

Blood-thinning drugs could protect against dementia and stroke in people with an irregular heartbeat, research suggests.
A study found that patients being treated for atrial fibrillation were less likely to develop dementia if they were taking anticoagulants.
While the findings could not prove cause and effect, they “Strongly suggested” blood-thinning pills protect against dementia in patients with the condition, the team said.
Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke and blood clots, which some experts think may appear in the brain and help trigger dementia.
Monitoring each person’s progress provided 1.5m years of follow-up during which 26,210 patients were diagnosed with dementia.
“Prof Jeremy Pearson, associate medical director at the British Heart Foundation, said:”Strokes caused by a clot blocking the blood vessels in the brain are a major cause of dementia, and atrial fibrillation is an important risk factor as it increases the chances of these clots forming.
“By treating AF patients with blood-thinning drugs, you reduce the risk of both stroke and dementia.”
“Dr Carol Routledge, head of science at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said:”The findings highlight a need to investigate this link further, but the nature of the study prevents us from firmly concluding that anticoagulants reduce the risk of dementia.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why This Cardiologist Is Betting That His Lab-Grown Meat Startup Can Solve the Global Food Crisis”

In a 1932 essay predicting sundry future trends, Winston Churchill wrote, “We shall escape the absurdity of growing a whole chicken in order to eat the breast or wing, by growing these parts separately under a suitable medium.” The basic science to grow meat in a lab has existed for more than 20 years, but no one has come close to making cultured meat anywhere near as delicious or as affordable as the real thing.
“They’re the leader in clean meat. There’s no one else that far along,” says venture capitalist Steve Jurvetson, whose firm led Memphis Meats’ recent $17 million Series A. Before he met Valeti in 2016, Jurvetson spent almost five years researching lab-grown meat and meat alternatives, believing the market was set to explode.
Lab meat, he says, “Because it’s meat, can be cooked any way meat is cooked. People can buy it off the shelf, take it home, and cook it in the ways they’ve known for centuries.”
Those arguments led Hampton Creek, one of the best-known and best-funded plant-based food startups, to expand into clean meat.
“It’s not crazy to think you might one day be able to brew meat at $1 per pound.”Ryan Bethencourt, a Memphis Meats investor.
Cultivating meat should have high startup costs but low operational costs: Given the right conditions, living cells divide on their own.
Electric cars are an apt metaphor, because whenever clean meat does hit supermarkets, it will almost certainly be pricier than conventional meat.
While Missouri’s pig farmers may see their doom in a world of meat without animals, companies that buy meat from farmers view it very differently, explains Jurvetson.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Up in the Air: Meet the Man Who Flies Around the World for Free”

With wide ears, Buddy Holly glasses and a shock of strawberry-blond hair, Schlappig resembles Ralphie from A Christmas Story if he’d grown up to become a J. Crew model.
Schlappig owes his small slice of fame to his blog “One Mile at a Time,” a diary of a young man living the life of the world’s most implausible airline ad. Posting as often as six times a day, he metes out meticulous counsel on the art of travel hacking – known in this world as the Hobby.
It’s not simply how-to tips that draw his fans, it’s the vicarious thrill of Schlappig’s nonstop-luxury life – one recent flight with a personal shower and butler service, or the time Schlappig was chauffeured across a tarmac in a Porsche.
Schlappig read one detailed post after another that insisted Manufacture Spend was the only true way to fly for free – like sliding a coin into a slot machine and yanking it back with clear string.
As a conciliatory gesture for anything broken on a given flight, United offered coupons to passengers worth $200 or $400. Every time he boarded a plane, Schlappig looked for something broken – a headset or an overhead light – and racked up the coupons.
“A lot of people get shafted. But it also creates an opportunity for people who can break the system and live like Schlappig. They’re chasing around these people who are trying to game a system that they themselves set up.”
Schlappig has barely stepped off the elevator into the hotel’s glistening VIP lounge when someone shouts, “Is that who I think it is?” Two stout men and a blonde see a beaming Schlappig heading toward them, all hugs and first names.
“The world is so big, I can keep running,” Schlappig says.

The orginal article.