Summary of “U.S. Fertility Rate Reaches a Record Low”

The present overall fertility rate puts the United States population below replacement level, but that does not mean the population is declining.
“Yes, it’s below replacement level, but not dramatically so,” Dr. Brady said.
The birthrate for women ages 30 to 34 rose by 1 percent over the 2015 rate, and the rate for women ages 35 to 39 went up by 2 percent, the highest rate in that age group since 1962.
Women ages 40 to 44 also had more babies, up 4 percent from 2015.
The rate for women 45 to 49 increased to 0.9 births per thousand from 0.8 in 2015.The birthrate among unmarried women went down, to 42.1 per 1,000 from 43.5 in 2015, a drop of 3 percent and the eighth consecutive year of decline since the peak of 51.8 in 2007 and 2008.There were differences by race: 28.4 percent of white babies had unmarried parents, 69.7 percent of black babies and 52.5 percent of Hispanics.
The preterm birthrate – babies born before 37 weeks of gestation – increased to 9.84 percent from 9.63 percent in 2015.
This is the second year in a row of increases in preterm birth after a decline of 8 percent from 2007 to 2014.The highest rate of preterm birth was among non-Hispanic blacks, at 13.75 percent, and lowest among Asians, at 8.63 percent.
In 2016, 31.9 percent of births were by cesarean section, compared with 32 percent in 2015.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Great White Celebrity Vacuum”

Call it a great white celebrity vacuum – or the continued erosion of old-school, white star power.
The white celebrity vacuum suggests that ideals and expectations of womanhood, and white womanhood in particular, are in flux.
The overarching reason has much more to do with how the election – and the fact that 53% of white women voted for Trump – has revealed the fault lines in the celebrity-sustained myth of the well-intentioned white woman.
Put differently, it’s increasingly hard for many women – women of color, but also white women – to trust or idealize white women.
White women in our everyday lives, white women as voters, white women on juries, and, by extension, white female celebrities, who have repeatedly fumbled or ignored the conversations of race, class, and gender that, in this hyperpoliticized moment, seem most vital and urgent.
No celebrity emblematizes this general distrust in white celebrity – and the well-intentioned, yet inwardly focused white woman in particular – more than Taylor Swift.
Swift grew up upper-middle class in Wyomissing, Pennsylvania – a deeply white suburb of Reading, Pennsylvania, that, like many other white suburbs, swung from voting for Obama in 2008 to Trump in 2016.
There might be a white female celebrity around the corner, just waiting to make people feel better about white women in America today.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It’s Not Just Mike Pence. Americans Are Wary of Being Alone With the Opposite Sex.”

In recent news about Uber and Fox News, women see cautionary tales about being alone with men.
Others described caution around people of the opposite sex, and some depicted the workplace as a fraught atmosphere in which they feared harassment, or being accused of it.
“Temptation is always a factor,” said Mr. Mauldin, 29.One reason women stall professionally, research shows, is that people have a tendency to hire, promote and mentor people like themselves.
Over all, people thought dinner or drinks with a member of the opposite sex other than a spouse was the most inappropriate, with more people disapproving than approving.
Fewer than two-thirds of respondents said a work meeting alone with a member of the opposite sex was appropriate; 16 percent of women and 18 percent of men with postgraduate degrees said it was inappropriate.
People who lived in rural areas, people who lived in the South or Midwest, people with less than a college education and people who were very religious, particularly evangelical Christians.
Shelby Wilt, 22, of Gilbert, Ariz., said she and her boyfriend socialize alone with friends of the opposite sex.
“Organizations are so concerned with their legal liabilities, but nobody’s really focused on how to reduce harassment and at the same time teach men and women to have working relationships with the opposite sex,” said Kim Elsesser, author of “Sex and the Office: Women, Men and the Sex Partition That’s Dividing the Workplace.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Women in Tech Speak Frankly on Culture of Harassment”

The tech industry has long suffered a gender imbalance, with companies such as Google and Facebook acknowledging how few women were in their ranks.
The investor has been accused of sexually harassing entrepreneurs while he worked at three different venture firms in the past seven years, often in meetings in which the women were presenting their companies to him.
Several of Silicon Valley’s top venture capitalists and technologists, including Reid Hoffman, a founder of LinkedIn, condemned Mr. Caldbeck’s behavior last week and called for investors to sign a “Decency pledge.” Binary has since collapsed, with Mr. Caldbeck leaving the firm and investors pulling money out of its funds.
The chain of events has emboldened more women to talk publicly about the treatment they said they had endured from tech investors.
Ms. Pao lost the case, but it sparked a debate about whether women in tech should publicly call out unequal treatment.
“Having had several women come out earlier, including Ellen Pao and me, most likely paved the way and primed the industry that these things indeed happen,” said Gesche Haas, an entrepreneur who said she was propositioned for sex by an investor, Pavel Curda, in 2014.
At a mostly male tech gathering in Las Vegas in 2009, Susan Wu, an entrepreneur and investor, said that Mr. Sacca, an investor and former Google executive, touched her face without her consent in a way that made her uncomfortable.
“After being made aware of instances of Dave having inappropriate behavior with women in the tech community, we have been making changes internally,” 500 Startups said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Men Don’t Want to Be Nurses. Their Wives Agree.”

In theory, nursing should appeal to men because it pays fairly good wages and is seen as a profession with a defined skill set.
Just 10 percent of nurses are men, despite “Are You Man Enough to Be a Nurse?” posters and other efforts to enlist men.
The hope is to focus on millennials who may be less bound by notions of traditional masculinity, said Brent MacWilliams, president of the American Assembly for Men in Nursing and a former commercial fisherman who is now an associate professor of nursing at Wisconsin-Oshkosh.
He has seen more men apply to nursing schools, but he acknowledges his group will fall short of its goal of 20 percent male nurses by 2020.Nursing and teaching, another growing field dominated by women, may require levels of education or training that can be daunting for those men who were less successful in school but made a good living in manufacturing.
Just 20 percent of the students are men, although that represents an increase from 10 percent 15 years ago.
Men who become home health care aides are more often minorities, according to Janette S. Dill, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Akron who has studied gender and the health care industry.
“I sometimes wonder if health organizations don’t want men to come into these jobs because they’ll demand higher wages,” Professor Dill said.
“We need to reinvent pink-collar jobs so men will take them and won’t be unhappy – or women, either.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Refugee Scholarship Helped Woman Yemeni Scientist Escape Her War-Torn Homeland”

Two years ago, Eqbal Dauqan was going to work in the morning as usual.
Dauqan is a woman scientist in what’s possibly the hardest place on Earth to be a woman: Yemen.
In 2014, Dauqan was named one of the top women scientists in the developing world by the Elsevier Foundation.
In March 2015, Dauqan’s hometown of Taiz got pulled into Yemen’s bloody civil war.
Dauqan turns to her computer and brings up some photos.
After the bombings began, Dauqan had to stop her research.
Then one day, after spending months in hiding, Dauqan had an idea: Maybe her science could get her out of the war.
Dauqan works long hours in labs, continues to publish papers and mentor students.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s the Problem with Feminism?”

The first one is called What’s the Problem with Men? In it, I discuss a lot of the unhealthy cultural forces that lead men to oppress women.
The current feminist movement is not a protest against unjust laws or sexist institutions as much as it is the protest against people’s unconscious biases as well as centuries-worth of cultural norms and heritage that disadvantage women.
Despite the constant drumming of 77 cents women earn on the dollar compared to men, when you factor in the fact that men work longer hours, more dangerous jobs, and retire later, the wage gap today is actually only something like 93 to 95 cents for every dollar a man earns.
Tribal feminism laid out a specific set of beliefs – that everywhere you look there is constant oppression from the patriarchy, that masculinity is inherently violent, and that the only differences between men and women are figments of our cultural imagination, not based on biology or science.
“That’s the Trench You’re Willing to Die In?”. Sam Harris, the famous atheist author as well as a bona fide far-left progressive and severe critic of women’s oppression worldwide, found himself in the crosshairs of tribal feminists recently.
Previous generations of feminists were willing to die in the trenches of getting women the right to vote, to go to college, to have an equal education, for protection from domestic violence, and workplace discrimination, and equal pay, and fair divorce laws.
Today, tribal feminists are more interested in enforcing thoughts and perceptions about women, rather than actually becoming the women they wish others to see.
One of the many stereotypes that men ascribed to women when doing this was that women were overly concerned with their feelings and the ways others perceived them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Men Harass Women? New Study Sheds Light On Motivations”

A May study from Promundo, an international research group, and U.N. Women sheds fresh light on men’s motivations for harassing women on the streets in four areas in the Middle East: Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco and the Palestinian territories.
“We know quite a lot about women and girls but about men and boys” when it comes to harassment, says Shereen El Feki, co-author of the report and the author of Sex and the Citadel: Intimate Life in a Changing Arab World.
The report found that of the 4,830 men surveyed, as many as 31 percent in Lebanon to 64 percent in Egypt admitted to having sexually harassed women and girls in public, from ogling to stalking to rape.
The U.S. isn’t immune – 65 percent of 2,000 women surveyed said they had experienced street harassment, according to a 2014 study conducted by the research firm GfK for Stop Street Harassment, an advocacy group.
In the Palestinian territories, Morocco and Egypt, young men with secondary-level education were more likely to sexually harass women than their older, less-educated peers.
Generally, men who have finished high school or college hold more enlightened attitudes toward women than those who have had no primary school or schooling at all, says Barker, who has studied men and gender equality in over 20 countries.
The harassment is also a way for young men to “Get their kicks,” says El Feki.
Holly Kearl, executive director for Stop Street Harassment and author of Stop Global Street Harassment: Growing Activism Around the World, says she is not surprised.

The orginal article.

Summary of “American Chipmakers Had a Toxic Problem. So They Outsourced It”

Reproductive dangers are among the most serious concerns in occupational health, because workers’ unborn children can suffer birth defects or childhood diseases, and also because reproductive issues can be sentinels for disorders, especially cancer, that don’t show up in the workers themselves until long after exposure.
Kim began compiling and analyzing occupational-health studies about semiconductor workers worldwide, a body of work that had drawn little attention in South Korea despite the industry’s importance there.
Kim could see that Pastides pointed to these same chemicals when he did his study at Digital Equipment, as did the Johns Hopkins scientists working with IBM. The IBM study found miscarriage rates tripled for women who worked specifically with EGEs.
Historical reproductive-health studies connected microelectronics production to fatal birth defects in the children of male workers, childhood cancers among the children of female workers, and infertility and prolonged menstrual cycles.
They got five years of physician-reimbursement records through 2012 for women of childbearing age working at plants owned by the country’s three largest microelectronics companies: Samsung, SK Hynix, and LG. Samsung and SK Hynix accounted for the vast majority of women in the study, as the two have long been among the world’s largest chipmakers.
The findings were conservative, because many women don’t go to the doctor for miscarriages, and because production workers couldn’t be separated in the study from those who worked in offices.
Even today, the chipmakers themselves sometimes don’t know what they’re bringing into their facilities and exposing their workers to.
A movement in South Korea to recognize the health consequences of toxic exposure for semiconductor workers has slowly amassed political, social, and cultural gravity over the course of a decade.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A letter to my sons after watching Wonder Woman”

Wonder Woman is a pretty big deal, and it’s something many of us doubted we’d see in our lifetime: a good DC Comics movie.
There’s a lot going on here, and it’s something I think we should talk about, because I don’t want you to hear about Wonder Woman from the streets.
No, this isn’t how women feel watching Marvel films You know how the first chunk of the movie featured no men? It’s kind of tempting to think that uncomfortable feeling we both experienced is what women feel every time they watch a superhero movie with a mostly male cast.
Women don’t go to the movies expecting to see themselves in the heroes; they’ve spent their entire lives consuming pop culture that is meant to make white men like us feel good and powerful.
It’s important to examine our feelings, but just be aware this isn’t a magical window into what women feel watching the majority of superhero films.
Wonder Woman shows us a happy, healthy environment where we’re not needed for manual labor, war or sex.
Wonder Woman is set in 1918, and shows how little respect Diana is given once she enters London society.
Because Wonder Woman doesn’t have the luxury of being just a movie, and like everything else in this life it has to be twice as good to get the same amount of basic respect because a white guy isn’t the most visible character.

The orginal article.