Summary of “deadspin-quote-carrot-aligned-w-bgr-2”

Most of these women are young, in their teens and early 20s, and exist as beginners outside the special effects industry, teaching themselves how to do the makeup or studying it in specialized schools.
A lot of special effects makeup bloggers say that commenters-particularly men-are confused as to why these young women are prioritizing guts and gore over traditional makeup.
The most popular makeup trends today, what consumers seem to want the most, tends toward a heavy self-care angle: taking time for yourself to put on a face mask, looking for natural products, slathering on acidic serums to perfect your skin so you don’t need makeup.
Gory special effects makeup blogging defies everything makeup is “Supposed” to offer women, and what women are “Supposed” to want from makeup, on Instagram and elsewhere in 2017.
In an industry that increasingly demands young women be “Well”-which so often means conventionally pretty, gooey, laboriously clean inside and out-it is refreshing that there is a parallel Instagram universe where girls are using makeup to make themselves look purposefully unwell.
“If you look on social media the majority of people doing special effects makeup are women and if if you look at the schools for special effects the majority of students are women,” Jones confirms.
Age makeup is the hardest kind of special effects technique to do, she says.
While younger Instagrammers like Haese and Ferner aren’t sure if they even want to pursue special effects makeup professionally, Kiana Jones is steadily trying to move above and beyond her Instagram.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why being grumpy at work is good for you”

I grew up, like so many junior employees, understanding that the way to get and keep a good job was through hard work and unflappable politeness.
“The argument for promoting happiness at work has always been primarily about productivity,” he notes.
“People who focus on being happy actually, over time, become less happy.” Depending on where you work, efforts to boost morale could include everything from offering office employees free ice cream on Fridays to instructing baristas to fake cheerfulness during their early-morning shifts.
Even the more sophisticated and well-intentioned efforts-like providing technology so workers can work from home easily-can dissolve the important distinctions between work and private life.
Dieter Zapf, the chairman of the work and organizational psychology department at the University of Frankfurt am Main, has conducted thousands of interviews of customer-service workers forced to hide their true emotions from customers.
A study published in 2011 in the Academy of Management Journal concluded that faking a smile at work can worsen your mood and cause you to withdraw from your work.
All workers benefit when their emotional well-being is not being dictated by corporate overlords or being manipulated for company gain.
Like Melissa Sloan, Mears is quick to point out that the burden of emotional labor tends to be shouldered more heavily by people in the working class: “Professional women can probably pull off being grumpy a lot more easily than service working women-part of that is the class privilege of being in the professions.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dystopian dreams: how feminist science fiction predicted the future”

Feminist science fiction does tend to feel fresh – its authors have a habit of looking beyond their particular historical moment, analysing the root causes, suggesting how they might be, if not solved, then at least changed.
Where does the story of feminist science fiction begin? There are so many possible starting points: Margaret Cavendish’s 1666 book The Blazing World, about an empress of a utopian kingdom; one could point convincingly to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as an exploration of how men could “Give birth” and what might happen if they did; one could recall the 1905 story “Sultana’s Dream” by Begum Rokeya, about a gender-reversed India in which it’s the men who are kept in purdah.
The link with feminist science fiction? Theodora and Alfred Kroeber’s daughter was Ursula Le Guin, the science fiction author.
Of course, not every author of feminist science fiction was taught how to make a fire in the wilderness by her parents.
Feminist – or let’s say gender-questioning – science fiction asks insistently, through careful construction of different societies, how much of what we think now, today, in generic western culture about men and women is innate in the human species and how much is just invented.
The Handmaid’s Tale is probably the most famous work of feminist speculative fiction ever published; certainly it’s one with a huge and appreciative audience outside the borders of the “Genre” science fiction and fantasy readership.
In Joanna Russ’s novel The Female Man, four women from four parallel worlds meet, travelling from world to world to see how their lives could have been different under a different system.
Feminist science fiction does have a way of finding resonances in the modern world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Men and the Manufacturing Decline”

Once, men had good earnings, especially when compared with women.
Now these men don’t earn much more than women do, and so fewer people are getting married, and more children are being born out of wedlock.
The authors show that these trends have been much more pronounced in areas that have lost a significant number of manufacturing jobs, where, as a result, men’s prospects have declined disproportionately.
In areas impacted by a trade shock, the numbers of marriageable men relative to women declined, because men had migrated elsewhere, joined the military, or fallen out of the labor force.
Fewer men were working in manufacturing, which tended to mean their wages were lower than they had been when manufacturing had more of a presence in their area.
These patterns seem to hinge on whether men are making more money than women, the authors found.
“It does appear that places where manufacturing is prevalent, it’s kind of a fulcrum, a cornerstone of a way of life where men have relatively stable, modestly high earnings and women are more likely to be married to them,” Autor said.
In past times of economic hardship, birth rates plummeted because women didn’t want to marry and have babies with men who didn’t have jobs.

The orginal article.