Summary of “6 Things You Need to Recover From Every Day”

When it’s time to call it a day, completely detach yourself from work and become absorbed in the other areas of your life.
The 9-5 work schedule was developed during the industrial revolution for factory workers, whose work was mostly physical labor.
If you set things up clearly, people at work will respect that when you’re away, you’re not available except in case of emergency.
Recover From TechnologyIn our technology-overwhelmed world, the only way to properly recover from work is to set healthy boundaries on your technology.
Experienced substantially higher sleep quality and less sleep “Disturbances”Increased ability to maintain enthusiasm to get things done while working.
Recover From People”Time alone is really essential, to get away and contemplate, think, and wonder.” - Jim Rohn.Just as you need recovery from work and technology, you also need some healthy recovery from people.
Billionaire Sara Blakely, founder of Spanx, drives a fake 40-minute commute to work despite living 5 minutes from work.
Fasting can reverse binge eating disorders, and help those who find it difficult to establish a correct eating pattern due to work and other priorities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Carmageddon is Coming”

The electric drive-train is also more efficient and powerful than the ones in petrol or diesel cars, which lose most of their energy through heat.
That’s why Daimler-Mercedes, the world’s oldest car company, is planning to spend $15 billion on building 10 new models of electric vehicles by 2022.
It’s why legendary car designer Henry Fisker just unveiled a new vehicle that has a top speed of 250km/h, a range of 640km and charges from totally flat to full in 36 minutes.
Today, every single major car company says they’ll have fully autonomous vehicles on the road before 2021 and a few, like Tesla and General Motors, say they’ll be ready to go in a year.
Most of these estimates are too conservativeTwo years after the tipping point, car prices will crash as people give up their vehicles and new car sales for individuals will drop to nearly zero, meaning carnage for car dealerships, auto insurers and repair shops.
Bad news for doctors and nurses, who are going to need to find new work when car accidents, responsible for more than half of the admissions to emergency rooms in most OECD countries, disappear.
If parking goes away, road capacity increases by several times and an on-demand ride is the cost of a coffee, then we need to start thinking much more generally, not just about cars, trucks and roads but cities, land use and real-estate.
Cars have remade cities over the past century, and if cars are now going to change entirely, cities will change too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Investor Who Took On Uber, And Silicon Valley”

Kapor Klein decided to write an open letter to Uber – which she published with her husband – after a young woman shared an explosive account of sexual harassment at Uber headquarters.
“Go to Sequoia, go to Benchmark, go to Kleiner, go to Accel, go to Andreessen, go to Khosla,” she names the kings of much-storied Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park, Calif. She’s sitting inside the Kapor Center for Social Impact – a name that spells out the intent of the place.
Kapor Klein and her husband bought this four-story building in central Oakland – what’s become the edge of Silicon Valley as tech expands beyond Cupertino, Mountain View and San Francisco – and it houses an investment arm, research and philanthropic projects.
Kapor Klein faults the investor class, which holds on to the myth of meritocracy, that they are the hyper-rational conduits of capital and it so just happens that white men are the most worthy.
Castro, who is based in Albany, N.Y., describes Kapor Klein as “Protective,” an early investor who tries to shoo away others who don’t share their values.
In some ways, Kapor Klein wants young people who grew up poor to channel Silicon Valley’s sense of entitlement – the idea that it’s OK to fail; that failure is necessary; and that one deserves support anyway.
Kapor Klein disagrees – and Uber’s monumental meltdown is arguably proof she was right.
Kapor Klein wants the world to understand: Yes, she spoke out when others would not.

The orginal article.

Summary of “deadspin-quote-carrot-aligned-w-bgr-2”

Step 2: Tunneling Out Via VPN. Enter the VPN or Virtual Private Network program, one of the best tools you’ve got when it comes to staying anonymous and safe on the web.
Whichever VPN you choose and install-and we’d recommend paying for a reputable one-it creates a secret, sealed tunnel between your computer and the VPN’s own servers.
Those servers can be located anywhere in the world, which is why VPNs are a popular choice for people wanting to spoof their location.
As far as your digital footprint goes, a good VPN keeps you anonymous from just about everyone but the VPN company itself and the most determined hackers or law enforcement agencies.
Many VPNs sell themselves on the anonymity they promise to provide, but you need to be very careful and do a little research-resources like That One Privacy Site and The Best VPN can help here.
Once you get a VPN installed, you’re effectively at the mercy of your VPN rather than your internet provider as far as tracking your web history goes, so adjust your expectations and activities accordingly.
These apps definitely add security and safety to your browsing, but not necessarily anonymity-Lifehacker has an excellent guide to VPN misconceptions.
As we said at the start, staying completely anonymous on the web is a tricky task, but get yourself on a wide network of public Wi-Fi points, with a solid, privacy-conscious VPN and an incognito mode session, and you’re off to a very good start.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Power Causes Brain Damage”

If power were a prescription drug, it would come with a long list of known side effects.
The historian Henry Adams was being metaphorical, not medical, when he described power as “a sort of tumor that ends by killing the victim’s sympathies.” But that’s not far from where Dacher Keltner, a psychology professor at UC Berkeley, ended up after years of lab and field experiments.
Subjects under the influence of power, he found in studies spanning two decades, acted as if they had suffered a traumatic brain injury-becoming more impulsive, less risk-aware, and, crucially, less adept at seeing things from other people’s point of view.
Which gives a neurological basis to what Keltner has termed the “Power paradox”: Once we have power, we lose some of the capacities we needed to gain it in the first place.
Power, the research says, primes our brain to screen out peripheral information.
It’s difficult to stop power’s tendency to affect your brain.
Lord David Owen-a British neurologist turned parliamentarian who served as the foreign secretary before becoming a baron-recounts both Howe’s story and Clementine Churchill’s in his 2008 book, In Sickness and in Power, an inquiry into the various maladies that had affected the performance of British prime ministers and American presidents since 1900.
“Hubris syndrome,” as he and a co-author, Jonathan Davidson, defined it in a 2009 article published in Brain, “Is a disorder of the possession of power, particularly power which has been associated with overwhelming success, held for a period of years and with minimal constraint on the leader.” Its 14 clinical features include: manifest contempt for others, loss of contact with reality, restless or reckless actions, and displays of incompetence.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Exit Interview: Bob McGinn, Packers Journalist”

After 38 years covering the Packers for Wisconsin newspapers, Bob McGinn left the beat last month and put his house up for sale in Green Bay.
Highly respected for his diligence, knowledge of the game and his tireless tape study of every play, he taught a generation of NFL writers how to cover football teams.
“I would get letters from fans quoting Bob McGinn. He timed the hang time of punts! He timed the hang time for the snapper to get it back !”.
This exit interview is McGinn on the record about football, about the Packers, about journalism.
It’s not just about his favorite Packer stories, but also about the state of the media business, the state of football coverage, the line there has to be between reporter and team, and the McGinn style.
The MMQB: You documented how fortunate it was that Aaron Rodgers didn’t have to play the first couple of years-he just wasn’t ready.
McGinn: “Yes! Yes, by all means. I played it. I got knocked out. A lot of kids suffer concussions in soccer. Yeah, I don’t think kids should be playing until 13 or 14. I didn’t put on pads until I was a freshman in high school and I’m glad. You want your body to develop, it’s way too young to start stuff. But once you get to high school and a certain age, the padding today, the safety measures, I think it is a great sport and I don’t have any problem with it.”
McGinn: “No, but I will miss sitting there after Packer games on that Monday for seven or eight hours with that remote, and the mysteries of the game, back and forth, 20 times maybe on a one-yard run, just trying to figure out what happened and knowing and having talked to enough players, that I kind of know the scheme and I know what should happen, and just going back and forth and seeing why this play failed, who was at fault or who threw a great block on a great play. That was really fun. And then I love the act of writing.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “People Don’t Follow Titles: Necessity and Sufficiency in Leadership”

Titles often come with the assumption people will follow you based on a title.
Being in a position of leadership is necessary to lead an organization, but that is not sufficient to get people moving towards a common goal.
In his book The Secret History of the Mongol Queens, Jack Weatherford tells an amazing story of the unlikely, but immensely successful, leadership of Manduhai the Wise.
First Manduhai had to keep herself and the boy, Dayan Khan, alive.
Manduhai demonstrated the courage and intelligence to lead and to provide what her people needed.
Her story teaches us the difference between necessity and sufficiency when it comes to leadership.
Manduhai ticked all the necessary boxes, being a Queen, choosing a descendant of Genghis Khan to rule by her side, and asking for meaningful spiritual blessings.
With the same assiduous devotion she had applied to the battlefield and the unification of the Mongol nation, Manduhai and Dayan Khan now set to the reorganization of the Mongol government and its protection in the future.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This is how Big Oil will die”

The Keystone XL closed thanks to a confluence of technologies that came together faster than anyone in the oil and gas industry had ever seen.
Let’s bring this back to today: Big Oil is perhaps the most feared and respected industry in history.
Oil is warming the planet - cars and trucks contribute about 15% of global fossil fuels emissions - yet this fact barely dents its use.
Oil fuels the most politically volatile regions in the world, yet we’ve decided to send military aid to unstable and untrustworthy dictators, because their oil is critical to our own security.
For the last century, oil has dominated our economics and our politics.
Big Oil will be cut down in the next decade by a combination of smartphone apps, long-life batteries, and simpler gearing.
To understand why Big Oil is in far weaker a position than anyone realizes, let’s take a closer look at the lynchpin of oil’s grip on our lives: the internal combustion engine, and the modern vehicle drivetrain.
Electric vehicles do not need oil changes, air filters, or timing belt replacements; the 200,000 mile Tesloop never even had its brakes replaced.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How artificial intelligence can deliver real value to companies”

Companies new to the space can learn a great deal from early adopters who have invested billions into AI and are now beginning to reap a range of benefits.
After decades of extravagant promises and frustrating disappointments, artificial intelligence is finally starting to deliver real-life benefits to early-adopting companies.
Most of the investment in AI consists of internal R&D spending by large, cash-rich digital-native companies like Amazon, Baidu, and Google.
In a McKinsey Global Institute discussion paper, Artificial intelligence: The next digital frontier?, which includes a survey of more than 3,000 AI-aware companies around the world, we find early AI adopters tend to be closer to the digital frontier, are among the larger firms within sectors, deploy AI across the technology groups, use AI in the most core part of the value chain, adopt AI to increase revenue as well as reduce costs, and have the full support of the executive leadership.
Early evidence suggests that there is a business case to be made, and that AI can deliver real value to companies willing to use it across operations and within their core functions.
Companies based in the United States absorbed 66 percent of all external investments into AI companies in 2016, according to our global review; China was second, at 17 percent, and is growing fast.
For many companies, this means accelerating the digital-transformation journey.
AI is not going to allow companies to leapfrog getting the digital basics right.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Radiohead’s ‘OK Computer’: An Oral History”

The band let us hang backstage over the course of two days at the Berkeley Greek Theater as they shared memories from that tumultuous and wildly innovative time in their lives, and a week later Thom Yorke sat down with RS at an Italian restaurant in Los Angeles to chat some more.
Thom Yorke: Having a big hit was a bit of a mind-fuck on one level, but it was extremely useful on another level.
Thom called me a few months after I thought the album was done and asked if I could record them in their rehearsal space.
Ed O’Brien: Thom used to demo a lot of stuff on tour, and we recorded at soundcheck, too.
Then Jonny scored the strings to his piano thing and Thom added some dialogue from Three Days of the Condor he’d taped off the TV. Thom Yorke: was from a book and then I did some reading up about it.
Thom Yorke: Partly we were told that’s what we had to do all this, and partly we thought, “Let’s really fucking go for it. Let the machine do what it needs to do and we’ll try to give it as much as we can.” But you end up feeling pretty fake really quickly.
There are times you’re in Northern Germany and the lights are going out at four in the afternoon and it’s freezing cold and Thom has a sore throat and you’re worried about the next few gigs.
Thom Yorke: Oh, did they? They’re still there, aren’t they? I was really fucked off about that because they were doing that and they’d deny it.

The orginal article.