Summary of “This chart spells out in black and white just how many jobs will be lost to robots”

When robots come for our jobs, the first people to fall will be those working in retail and fast food restaurants as well as the ubiquitous secretaries who are an indispensable part of the corporate world.
It may not happen overnight but slowly, machines are gaining on man’s turf and in a decade or two, about 50% of jobs in existence today will have gone the way of dinosaurs, or in this case, automation, according to Henrik Lindberg, chief technology officer at Swedish fintech company Zimpler.
Using data from a comprehensive employment report from University of Oxford, Lindberg drew up a monochrome chart, reproduced by Visual Capitalist, that illustrates a society that is increasingly relying on robots.
“As computers get better at, for example, perception-think self-driving car-those services jobs are likely next up to be replaced by machines,” said Jeff Desjardins, an editor of Visual Capitalist.
In the chart above, the black field shows jobs that will disappear with automation while the white represents those that are projected to survive.
It will also likely affect low-income workers more than those making six figures.
Still, even as mankind continues to cede the labor force to robots, it’s not necessarily the end of civilization as we know it.
“While machines destroy jobs, they also often create new ones,” said Desjardins, echoing Marc Andreessen’s view that robots will not replace people en masse.
To be sure, not all job losses can be blamed on robots.
As the graphic below shows, even without automation, the composition of the U.S. job market has changed over the years as the U.S. economy evolves, making some industries virtually obsolete while others thrive.

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Summary of “Man who mowed lawn with tornado behind him says he ‘was keeping an eye on it.'”

A photo of a man in Alberta mowing a lawn with a tornado swirling behind him has been causing a storm on social media.
Cecilia Wessels snapped the picture of her husband, Theunis, on Friday evening as the twister passed near their home in Three Hills.
Wessels said she was woken by her nine-year-old daughter who was upset that there was something like a tornado in the sky, but her father wouldn’t come inside.
Theunis Wessels said the tornado was actually much further away than it appears in the photo, and that it was moving away from them.
There have been no reports of injuries from the tornado, although some other photos show downed trees and a barn with its roof ripped off.
“I literally took the picture to show my mum and dad in South Africa, ‘Look there’s a tornado,’ and now everyone is like, ‘Why is your husband mowing the lawn?'” Cecilia Wessels said Saturday.
“Our whole street, everyone was on their back patios taking pictures,” she said.
Theunis Wessels said he was keeping watch of his surroundings and saw the twister form as the swirling connected from the sky and the ground to form the funnel.
Both said tornadoes are not common in South Africa, but Theunis said he watched a TV program about storm chasers, so he’s familiar with them.
“It looks much closer if you look in the photo, but it was really far away. Well, not really far, far away, but it was far away from us,” he said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Alternative Facts Are The Norm In Public Understanding Of Science”

The notion of alternative facts was roundly mocked on social media.
One viral post depicted the cover of a fake children’s book – The Little Golden Book of Alternative Facts – on which a bird was labeled “Butterfly,” a chair “Table,” and a dog “Cat.” Alternative facts like these are absurd, and no one would endorse them.
There are many alternative facts that are just as absurd from an empirical point of view but widely endorsed nonetheless: that dinosaurs once coexisted with humans; that humans appeared on Earth in their current form; that the sun revolves around the Earth; that vaccines cause autism; that genetically modified foods are dangerous to eat; that humans are not responsible for climate change.
Alternative facts about political issues, like the size of inauguration crowds or the birthplace of Barack Obama, receive significant media attention and public ire, but alternative facts about science do not.
Alternative facts about science are commonplace; they are a well-established and long-accepted backdrop for public discourse about scientific issues.
Why are we outraged by alternative facts in politics but complacent about alternative facts in science? There are likely several reasons, but chief among them is that alternative facts in politics defy common sense, whereas alternative facts in science are completely sensible.
In my book Scienceblind: Why Our Intuitive Theories About the World Are So Often Wrong, I describe several intuitive theories of the physical world and several intuitive theories of the biological world that not only impede our ability to learn science but also make us susceptible to scientific misconceptions – or, in today’s parlance, alternative facts about science.
These two cases illustrate that alternative facts about science are just as pernicious as alternative facts about politics, if not more so.
Alternative facts about science go unnoticed by many non-scientists because they are grounded in alternative theories of how the world works.
If we are committed to combating alternate facts – as we should be – then we must also combat the alternative theories that license them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dissecting Marissa Mayer’s $900,000-a-Week Yahoo Paycheck”

So why did Ms. Mayer receive more than $900,000 a week? The answer, like so many things about Yahoo, is surprisingly complicated.
After the $4.5 billion sale to Verizon, shareholders will still own an investment company with $57 billion of stock in two Asian internet companies, Alibaba Group and Yahoo Japan.
As Yahoo shareholders profited, so did Ms. Mayer.
Most of Ms. Mayer’s paycheck ultimately came from the gains in Yahoo’s Alibaba and Yahoo Japan investments, over which she had little control.
Thanks to an investment made in 2005, Yahoo had a 24 percent stake in Alibaba, which today is China’s leading e-commerce company.
Yahoo also owns about 36 percent of Yahoo Japan, now worth about $9 billion, that it received as part of a deal struck in 1996, shortly after Yahoo was founded.
Through a combination of acquisitions and hiring, she vastly expanded Yahoo’s mobile team, which initially produced some buzzy hits like the Yahoo Weather app and Yahoo News Digest, along with more prosaic updates of core Yahoo features like fantasy sports and email.
Ms. Mayer largely failed in her quest to make Yahoo a “Daily habit” for more users in online video, search and messaging.
Peter Monaco, who was a vice president for engineering at Yahoo for three years before leaving for Facebook last September, said Ms. Mayer does not get enough credit for transforming Yahoo’s culture.
Ms. Mayer, who once made the grueling trek to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest peak, said last year that fixing Yahoo was like climbing a mountain.

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Summary of “Popular People Live Longer”

The human body’s sensitivity to popularity may reflect the effects of natural selection over thousands of years.
As social beings, we protected one another, shared resources and collaborated to gain advantages over other species.
Our popularity may have an effect on our DNA.George Slavich and Steve Cole, experts in the field of human social genomics at the University of California, Los Angeles, have described our genomic material as being exquisitely “Sensitive to social rejection.” They study what happens immediately after we’ve been left by a romantic partner, excluded from a social event, rejected by a stranger or even simply told that we may be judged by others we care about.
Professors Slavich and Cole suggest that ancestral humans who had no peers to defend them no longer had a great need to be protected from viruses – who would infect them? – so their bodies conserved energy by reducing their vigilance to infection.
That’s most likely why our concern for social standing begins so early and persists throughout our lives.
Dozens of studies reveal that children’s popularity can be measured reliably by age 3, and it remains remarkably stable not just through the next dozen years of primary and secondary education but also across contexts, as they move from community to community and into adulthood.
This same research reveals that there is more than one type of popularity, and most of us may be investing in the wrong kind.
Likability is markedly different from status – an ultimately less satisfying form of popularity that reflects visibility, influence, power and prestige.
Status can be quantified by social media followers; likability cannot.
We may be built by evolution to care deeply about popularity, but it’s up to us to choose the nature of the relationships we want with our peers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your mind can be trained to control chronic pain. But it will cost you”

Interest is again surging in a treatment method called biopsychosocial pain management, which trains patients to manage chronic pain with tools ranging from physical therapy to biofeedback to meditation.
It helped Carl White, a 43-year-old social worker from Leroy, Minn. The catch? It can take weeks and cost tens of thousands of dollars – and thus remains out of reach for most patients with chronic pain.
When pain is not just physical Chronic pain affects nearly 50 million Americans, according to the American Pain Foundation.
Chronic pain has a substantial psychological element: Being in pain often leads to self-imposed isolation.
“In the case of chronic pain, that system has gone awry,” Sperry said.
So although the pain may have originated in the foot, patients end up with headaches, chronic nausea, chronic fatigue, and back pain – developing a host of other symptoms as the brain short-circuits.
“Focusing solely on a pain generator in the body,” like a herniated disc or nerve damage, “Utterly and completely misses the chronic, complex, changing nature of chronic pain” as it’s processed and experienced in the brain over time, said Dr. Tracy Jackson, an associate professor of anesthesiology and a pain specialist at Vanderbilt University.
It’s tough to estimate how many people with chronic pain develop a dependence on medications, but in 2014, about 2.5 million adults had opioid addictions – and many of those addictions started with a prescription for potent pain pills.
“If it’s a 1-to-10 pain scale., a chronic pain patient will say, ‘Mine’s at a 12 or 13,'” White said.
Sperry has appealed to Congress to accelerate the shift with more funding – not just for chronic pain and addiction treatment, but also for medical education.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Making a Marriage Magically Tidy”

A year into our marriage, my husband said: “Would you mind keeping the dining room table clean? It’s the first thing I see when I come home.”
To keep my buzz going, I asked my husband if I could clean his closet.
My husband played hopscotch, never uttering a word of contempt, seemingly O.K. to coast on the memory of a pristine home as if it had been a once-in-a-lifetime bucket-list thrill like white-water rafting or winning a Pulitzer.
I scared myself straight by binge-watching “Hoarders.” What do you mean that woman couldn’t claw her way through her grocery bag “Collection” to give her husband CPR? That was not going to happen to me.
My husband confessed that his inheritance of Greek doilies and paintings of fishing boats from his grandmother did not spark joy.
The downside is that my husband has created a monster.
Without hesitation, my husband will always choose the apartment.
My husband says, “You’re like a dominatrix Donna Reed.”.
In our 21 years together, my husband’s nature hasn’t changed.
Because now, when my husband comes home, the first thing he sees is me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Scientists discover a sixth sense on the tongue-for water”

Mammalian taste buds may have an additional sixth sense-for water, a new study suggests.
The finding could help explain how animals can tell water from other fluids, and it adds new fodder to a centuries-old debate: Does water have a taste of its own, or is it a mere vehicle for other flavors?
A few recent brain scan studies also suggest that a region of human cortex responds specifically to water, she says.
“Almost nothing is known” about the molecular and cellular mechanism by which water is detected in the mouth and throat, and the neural pathway by which that signal is transmitted to the brain, says Zachary Knight, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Francisco.
The brain must receive information about water from the mouth and tongue, because animals stop drinking long before signals from the gut or blood could tell the brain that the body has been replenished, he says.
“The most surprising part of the project” was that the well-known, acid-sensing, sour TRCs fired vigorously when exposed to water, Oka says.
When given the option of drinking either water or a clear, tasteless, synthetic silicone oil, rodents lacking sour TRCs took longer to choose water, suggesting the cells help to distinguish water from other fluids.
After training the mice to drink water from a spout, the team replaced the water with an optic fiber that shone blue light on their tongues.
The rodents never learned that the light was just an illusion, but kept drinking long after mice drinking actual water would.
More research is needed to precisely determine how the acid-sensing taste buds respond to water, and what the mice experience when they do, Oka says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Australian convict pirates in Japan: evidence of 1830 voyage unearthed”

Fresh translations of samurai accounts of a “Barbarian” ship in 1830 give startling corroboration to a story modern scholars had long dismissed as convict fantasy: that a ragtag crew of criminals encountered a forbidden Japan at the height of its feudal isolation.
Its maverick skipper was William Swallow, a onetime British cargo ship apprentice and naval conscript in the Napoleonic wars, who in a piracy trial in London the following year told of a samurai cannonball in Japan knocking a telescope from his hand.
The ship anchored on 16 January 1830 off the town of Mugi, on Shikoku island, where Makita Hamaguchi, a samurai sent disguised as a fisherman to check the ship for weapons, noted an “Unbearable stench in the vicinity of the ship”.
With the help of a local volunteer manuscript reading group, Russell has since worked at translating written accounts of the ship’s arrival by Hamaguchi and another samurai, Hirota, now held by the Tokushima prefectural archive.
Bound to violently repel them by order of Japan’s ruling shogun, the samurai commanders showed some restraint, giving the foreigners advice on wind direction after raining down cannon balls and musket shot on their ship.
“The men on the ship do not look hungry at all and in fact they seem to be mocking us by diving off the stern and climbing back onto the ship again,” Mima said.
David Lawson, the Australian consul general in Osaka, said his office agreed there was “Strong evidence that the ship depicted in this account, as recorded by the people of Tokushima, was the brig Cyprus, which had been pirated by convicts escaping from the British penal colony which is now known as Hobart, Tasmania”.
I think we can say with a fair degree of certainty it was the first Australian ship.
Hirst said the Cyprus “In my opinion, must have been the first Australian ship to reach Japan”.
“I think we can say with a fair degree of certainty it was the first Australian ship.”

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Summary of “Looking For Right And Wrong In The Philippines”

Our family had owned the farm since the end of World War II, when the US government granted the land to my great-grandfather for his service as a guerrilla fighter resisting the Japanese occupation.
Uncle Pepo, my mother’s cousin, a dentist of modest means, was the farm’s de facto manager because he lived closer to it than anyone else in the family.
From his home in Iligan City, a bustling industrial town on the northern tip of Mindanao, the southernmost island of the Philippines, the farm was less than an hour’s drive up the mountains and into the jungle.
Her cousins who remained in the Philippines, all busy with professional careers, wanted the farm off their hands too.
Over my two weeks in the Philippines in April, hitting more than a dozen big and small cities from the northern tip to the southern edge, I spoke to scores of people – vendors, farmers, professors, drivers, politicians, cops, writers, business owners, lawyers, dentists – and nearly all of them, even those who voted against him, said they believe that their president is making the country better.
A family of tenant farmers who worked on our land lived here, Pepo said.
The conditions of our family farm made it unappealing to potential buyers.
The vast expanse of the farm surrounded us – the banana grove on the left, the durian trees beyond it, the empty corn fields across the center, the giant coconut trees to the right in the grassy fields where the livestock grazed.
Perhaps we would have developed the farm into a lucrative enterprise, built a big house for Sargento and his family, and paid for all of their schooling.
The farm, whether or not my family sells it, served its purpose for me – as a memory to keep, a reminder of what I left long ago.

The orginal article.