Summary of “What’s the Problem with Feminism?”

The first one is called What’s the Problem with Men? In it, I discuss a lot of the unhealthy cultural forces that lead men to oppress women.
The current feminist movement is not a protest against unjust laws or sexist institutions as much as it is the protest against people’s unconscious biases as well as centuries-worth of cultural norms and heritage that disadvantage women.
Despite the constant drumming of 77 cents women earn on the dollar compared to men, when you factor in the fact that men work longer hours, more dangerous jobs, and retire later, the wage gap today is actually only something like 93 to 95 cents for every dollar a man earns.
Tribal feminism laid out a specific set of beliefs – that everywhere you look there is constant oppression from the patriarchy, that masculinity is inherently violent, and that the only differences between men and women are figments of our cultural imagination, not based on biology or science.
“That’s the Trench You’re Willing to Die In?”. Sam Harris, the famous atheist author as well as a bona fide far-left progressive and severe critic of women’s oppression worldwide, found himself in the crosshairs of tribal feminists recently.
Previous generations of feminists were willing to die in the trenches of getting women the right to vote, to go to college, to have an equal education, for protection from domestic violence, and workplace discrimination, and equal pay, and fair divorce laws.
Today, tribal feminists are more interested in enforcing thoughts and perceptions about women, rather than actually becoming the women they wish others to see.
One of the many stereotypes that men ascribed to women when doing this was that women were overly concerned with their feelings and the ways others perceived them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Men Harass Women? New Study Sheds Light On Motivations”

A May study from Promundo, an international research group, and U.N. Women sheds fresh light on men’s motivations for harassing women on the streets in four areas in the Middle East: Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco and the Palestinian territories.
“We know quite a lot about women and girls but about men and boys” when it comes to harassment, says Shereen El Feki, co-author of the report and the author of Sex and the Citadel: Intimate Life in a Changing Arab World.
The report found that of the 4,830 men surveyed, as many as 31 percent in Lebanon to 64 percent in Egypt admitted to having sexually harassed women and girls in public, from ogling to stalking to rape.
The U.S. isn’t immune – 65 percent of 2,000 women surveyed said they had experienced street harassment, according to a 2014 study conducted by the research firm GfK for Stop Street Harassment, an advocacy group.
In the Palestinian territories, Morocco and Egypt, young men with secondary-level education were more likely to sexually harass women than their older, less-educated peers.
Generally, men who have finished high school or college hold more enlightened attitudes toward women than those who have had no primary school or schooling at all, says Barker, who has studied men and gender equality in over 20 countries.
The harassment is also a way for young men to “Get their kicks,” says El Feki.
Holly Kearl, executive director for Stop Street Harassment and author of Stop Global Street Harassment: Growing Activism Around the World, says she is not surprised.

The orginal article.

Summary of “American Chipmakers Had a Toxic Problem. So They Outsourced It”

Reproductive dangers are among the most serious concerns in occupational health, because workers’ unborn children can suffer birth defects or childhood diseases, and also because reproductive issues can be sentinels for disorders, especially cancer, that don’t show up in the workers themselves until long after exposure.
Kim began compiling and analyzing occupational-health studies about semiconductor workers worldwide, a body of work that had drawn little attention in South Korea despite the industry’s importance there.
Kim could see that Pastides pointed to these same chemicals when he did his study at Digital Equipment, as did the Johns Hopkins scientists working with IBM. The IBM study found miscarriage rates tripled for women who worked specifically with EGEs.
Historical reproductive-health studies connected microelectronics production to fatal birth defects in the children of male workers, childhood cancers among the children of female workers, and infertility and prolonged menstrual cycles.
They got five years of physician-reimbursement records through 2012 for women of childbearing age working at plants owned by the country’s three largest microelectronics companies: Samsung, SK Hynix, and LG. Samsung and SK Hynix accounted for the vast majority of women in the study, as the two have long been among the world’s largest chipmakers.
The findings were conservative, because many women don’t go to the doctor for miscarriages, and because production workers couldn’t be separated in the study from those who worked in offices.
Even today, the chipmakers themselves sometimes don’t know what they’re bringing into their facilities and exposing their workers to.
A movement in South Korea to recognize the health consequences of toxic exposure for semiconductor workers has slowly amassed political, social, and cultural gravity over the course of a decade.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A letter to my sons after watching Wonder Woman”

Wonder Woman is a pretty big deal, and it’s something many of us doubted we’d see in our lifetime: a good DC Comics movie.
There’s a lot going on here, and it’s something I think we should talk about, because I don’t want you to hear about Wonder Woman from the streets.
No, this isn’t how women feel watching Marvel films You know how the first chunk of the movie featured no men? It’s kind of tempting to think that uncomfortable feeling we both experienced is what women feel every time they watch a superhero movie with a mostly male cast.
Women don’t go to the movies expecting to see themselves in the heroes; they’ve spent their entire lives consuming pop culture that is meant to make white men like us feel good and powerful.
It’s important to examine our feelings, but just be aware this isn’t a magical window into what women feel watching the majority of superhero films.
Wonder Woman shows us a happy, healthy environment where we’re not needed for manual labor, war or sex.
Wonder Woman is set in 1918, and shows how little respect Diana is given once she enters London society.
Because Wonder Woman doesn’t have the luxury of being just a movie, and like everything else in this life it has to be twice as good to get the same amount of basic respect because a white guy isn’t the most visible character.

The orginal article.

Summary of “deadspin-quote-carrot-aligned-w-bgr-2”

Most of these women are young, in their teens and early 20s, and exist as beginners outside the special effects industry, teaching themselves how to do the makeup or studying it in specialized schools.
A lot of special effects makeup bloggers say that commenters-particularly men-are confused as to why these young women are prioritizing guts and gore over traditional makeup.
The most popular makeup trends today, what consumers seem to want the most, tends toward a heavy self-care angle: taking time for yourself to put on a face mask, looking for natural products, slathering on acidic serums to perfect your skin so you don’t need makeup.
Gory special effects makeup blogging defies everything makeup is “Supposed” to offer women, and what women are “Supposed” to want from makeup, on Instagram and elsewhere in 2017.
In an industry that increasingly demands young women be “Well”-which so often means conventionally pretty, gooey, laboriously clean inside and out-it is refreshing that there is a parallel Instagram universe where girls are using makeup to make themselves look purposefully unwell.
“If you look on social media the majority of people doing special effects makeup are women and if if you look at the schools for special effects the majority of students are women,” Jones confirms.
Age makeup is the hardest kind of special effects technique to do, she says.
While younger Instagrammers like Haese and Ferner aren’t sure if they even want to pursue special effects makeup professionally, Kiana Jones is steadily trying to move above and beyond her Instagram.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why being grumpy at work is good for you”

I grew up, like so many junior employees, understanding that the way to get and keep a good job was through hard work and unflappable politeness.
“The argument for promoting happiness at work has always been primarily about productivity,” he notes.
“People who focus on being happy actually, over time, become less happy.” Depending on where you work, efforts to boost morale could include everything from offering office employees free ice cream on Fridays to instructing baristas to fake cheerfulness during their early-morning shifts.
Even the more sophisticated and well-intentioned efforts-like providing technology so workers can work from home easily-can dissolve the important distinctions between work and private life.
Dieter Zapf, the chairman of the work and organizational psychology department at the University of Frankfurt am Main, has conducted thousands of interviews of customer-service workers forced to hide their true emotions from customers.
A study published in 2011 in the Academy of Management Journal concluded that faking a smile at work can worsen your mood and cause you to withdraw from your work.
All workers benefit when their emotional well-being is not being dictated by corporate overlords or being manipulated for company gain.
Like Melissa Sloan, Mears is quick to point out that the burden of emotional labor tends to be shouldered more heavily by people in the working class: “Professional women can probably pull off being grumpy a lot more easily than service working women-part of that is the class privilege of being in the professions.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dystopian dreams: how feminist science fiction predicted the future”

Feminist science fiction does tend to feel fresh – its authors have a habit of looking beyond their particular historical moment, analysing the root causes, suggesting how they might be, if not solved, then at least changed.
Where does the story of feminist science fiction begin? There are so many possible starting points: Margaret Cavendish’s 1666 book The Blazing World, about an empress of a utopian kingdom; one could point convincingly to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as an exploration of how men could “Give birth” and what might happen if they did; one could recall the 1905 story “Sultana’s Dream” by Begum Rokeya, about a gender-reversed India in which it’s the men who are kept in purdah.
The link with feminist science fiction? Theodora and Alfred Kroeber’s daughter was Ursula Le Guin, the science fiction author.
Of course, not every author of feminist science fiction was taught how to make a fire in the wilderness by her parents.
Feminist – or let’s say gender-questioning – science fiction asks insistently, through careful construction of different societies, how much of what we think now, today, in generic western culture about men and women is innate in the human species and how much is just invented.
The Handmaid’s Tale is probably the most famous work of feminist speculative fiction ever published; certainly it’s one with a huge and appreciative audience outside the borders of the “Genre” science fiction and fantasy readership.
In Joanna Russ’s novel The Female Man, four women from four parallel worlds meet, travelling from world to world to see how their lives could have been different under a different system.
Feminist science fiction does have a way of finding resonances in the modern world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Men and the Manufacturing Decline”

Once, men had good earnings, especially when compared with women.
Now these men don’t earn much more than women do, and so fewer people are getting married, and more children are being born out of wedlock.
The authors show that these trends have been much more pronounced in areas that have lost a significant number of manufacturing jobs, where, as a result, men’s prospects have declined disproportionately.
In areas impacted by a trade shock, the numbers of marriageable men relative to women declined, because men had migrated elsewhere, joined the military, or fallen out of the labor force.
Fewer men were working in manufacturing, which tended to mean their wages were lower than they had been when manufacturing had more of a presence in their area.
These patterns seem to hinge on whether men are making more money than women, the authors found.
“It does appear that places where manufacturing is prevalent, it’s kind of a fulcrum, a cornerstone of a way of life where men have relatively stable, modestly high earnings and women are more likely to be married to them,” Autor said.
In past times of economic hardship, birth rates plummeted because women didn’t want to marry and have babies with men who didn’t have jobs.

The orginal article.