Summary of “If Humble People Make the Best Leaders, Why Do We Fall for Charismatic Narcissists?”

The research is clear: when we choose humble, unassuming people as our leaders, the world around us becomes a better place.
Humble leaders improve the performance of a company in the long run because they create more collaborative environments.
A study of 161 teams found that employees following humble leaders were themselves more likely to admit their mistakes and limitations, share the spotlight by deflecting praise to others, and be open to new ideas, advice, and feedback.
German sociologist Max Weber defined charisma as “Of divine origin or as exemplary, and on the basis of it, the individual concerned is treated as a leader.” Research evidence on charismatic leadership reveals that charismatic people are more likely to become endorsed as leaders because of their high energy, unconventional behavior, and heroic deeds.
Although the socialized charismatic leader has the aura of a hero, it is counteracted with low authoritarianism and a genuine interest in the collective welfare.
In contrast, the personalized charismatic leader’s perceived heroism is coupled with high authoritarianism and high narcissism.
The problem is that we select negative charismatic leaders much more frequently than in the limited situations where the risk they represent might pay off.
If humble leaders are more effective than narcissistic leaders, why do we so often choose narcissistic individuals to lead us?
My own research shows that our psychological states can also bias our perceptions of charismatic leaders.
As a result, crises increase not only the search for charismatic leaders, but also our tendency to perceive charisma in the leaders we already follow.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Benedict Evan from Andreessen Horowitz predicts the future of electric and autonomous cars, VR and MR, machine learning, retail, e-commerce, and more”

On one hand, we have a set of profound changes coming as a result of new primary technology.
Electric and autonomous cars will change cities, virtual and mixed reality will change the entire computing experience, and machine learning is changing the kind of questions that computers can answer.
How do cities change if some or all of their parking space is now available for new needs, dumped on the market, or moved to completely different places? Where are you willing to live if access to public transport is everywhere and there are no traffic jams on your commute? How willing are people to go from their home in a suburb to dinner or a bar in a city center on a dark, cold, wet night if they don’t have to park and an on-demand ride is the cost of a coffee? And how does law enforcement change when every passing car is watching everything?
Once these really come to market, they may change the world just as much as the iPhone.
Machine learning is happening right now and rolls through, or perhaps underneath, the entire tech industry as a new fundamental computer-science capability-and of course enables both mixed reality and autonomous cars.
At the same time we have a set of more immediate changes, that have much more to do with consumer behavior, company strategy, and economic tipping points than with primary, frontier technology of the kind that Magic Leap or Waymo are building.
Again, this is especially important in the US, which is very over-served by pay TV: Almost everyone has it, and the average spend is much more than people in other developed markets typically pay, so there’s a lot of pent-up desire for change.
This will probably change, and the more that viewing shifts, the more that ad budgets will be reconsidered.
More deeply the more that buying shifts, the more that ad budgets might change.
How much, really, do AVs change shopping or the cost of home delivery? And what happens to your buying choices when machine learning means a pair of glasses can look at your living room and suggest a lamp based on your taste, and then show what it would look like in situ?

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Fix Your Broken Perception of Time”

What can we do? To fix our broken perception of time, we can reevaluate our relationship with it, become more aware of how we spend our days, and understand how our perception of time influences productivity.
One of the central questions in time perception research is whether our bodies have a single “Main clock”, or if our perception of time is governed by multiple structures in the brain.
As we get older, our organisms change, and so does our perception of time, making us feel like time is passing faster.
In his book “A Geography of Time”, Robert Levine explains how attitudes to time vary across countries and cultures.
Since our productivity is directly related to both, it’s easy to see how a distorted perception of time can negatively affect our performance.
We’ve looked at the causes of our broken perception of time and the consequences it has on our productivity.
Does your productivity spike at certain points during the day? Do you tend to work in large chunks of time? How much time do you waste on social media?
You will also become aware of how you spend your time, and hopefully realize what causes your perception of time to clash with reality.
If you’ve never tried volunteering or meditation, now is the time, as both can positively influence your perception of time.
No matter how much you tweak your perception of time, there will always be some time lost.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Gets Stolen From Restaurants? Everything”

Theater, well-designed restaurants turned regular customers into cunning thieves.
In a story on the subject in 2002, the New York Times highlighted several items that had been stolen from notable restaurants.
Restaurant thieves beware: Anything that costs from $1,000 to $3,000 counts as grand larceny.
The celebrity hangout gastropub The Spotted Pig has more things stolen from it than any other restaurant, claims co-owner Ken Friedman.
One night in 2014., the restaurant’s namesake, a 2-foot-long ceramic antique from England, which was chained to the front, was stolen.
The country Italian restaurant Coltivare in the Heights is known for its locavore pizzas and 3,000-square-foot garden, the source for dishes like the Backyard Lettuce and Herb Salad. That guests have walked in and grabbed vegetables and fruit off the vine doesn’t put it in the hall of fame of stolen-from restaurants; what really earned it legend status was when.
At the reopened mega Japanese restaurant Megu, the signature plates are disappearing.
It’s proved relatively easy for someone to slip the plates-used for dishes like Yellowtail Kanzuri and the Matcha Crepe Cake-into a large handbag: The restaurant estimates that about twice a week someone takes one.
Under the category of things that are technically useless outside the restaurant, here’s something interesting: At Underbelly, which celebrates the wildly diverse Houston food scene, the wine list is styled like a comic book with corresponding art and graffitied blurbs.
At the Cal-Italian restaurant Love & Salt in Manhattan Beach, the vibrantly colored, Americana tin salt and pepper shaker cans that hold the checks are routinely taken.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Millennial Obsession With Self-Care”

There is one generation that has been consistently defined by its obsessions: avocado toast, memes, Harry Potter … and self-care.
Today, self-care, as it’s defined by Gracy Obuchowicz, a facilitator and self-care mentor and coach in Washington, D.C., “Assumes that we’re OK as we are and we just need to take care of ourselves … Self-care alone is not enough. You need to have self-awareness too. Self-care plus self-awareness equals self-love.”
While self-care has been around for centuries, it has only recently been co-opted by stars such as Solange and consumerized into self-care kits.
They spend twice as much as boomers on self-care essentials such as workout regimens, diet plans, life coaching, therapy and apps to improve their personal well-being.
It found that students reported using the Web to identify self-care strategies, alternative therapies and other information related to nutrition and fitness.
Do a quick Google search and you’ll find hundreds of articles about self-care, occasionally accompanied with lists of advice such as “Go to a farmers market” or “Buy a new candle” or “Drive with the windows down.” So it comes as no surprise that the generation that takes advantage of the Internet the most is also the generation that devotes the most time and money to the $10 billion self-care industry.
Im said we might find ourselves comparing our lives to the perfection we see on the Internet, which leads us to utilizing online tools for self-care – and the cycle continues.
Im said the introduction of social media throughout the millennial generation has increased understanding of mental illnesses and decreased the stigma.
Beyond social media, Obuchowicz said she has noticed an uptick in the interest in self-care lately, particularly since the election.
Obuchowicz says it’s more than just social media that has pushed millennials to the forefront of the self-care discussion.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Leftovers’ Examination of Life, Death, Einstein and Time Travel”

We all know that’s part of the package deal of being human, and if we don’t know that, we’re taught that by time, the slowest and most exacting teacher.
What if, for the briefest span of time, an observer could pause the hurtling energy of the universe and pin down every single place and time in which we exist? Everything seen, mapped, understood.
The gravity well of a black hole had hovered nearby, for such a long time.
Einstein was right: The passage of time depends on your perspective.
Slooowww motion: There was enough time to wish, from the bottom of my soul, for a different velocity, an alternate life.
These variations were there the whole time, or they are new.
Every single heartbreak I endured while going to the pharmacy, buying groceries, watching “Judge Judy” with mom, watching my father make coffee for the last time, his bones brittle and wrong – yes, Johnny Cash, I remember everything.
I thought the everyday aches I had to put to one side during a time of sheer survival had been dropped, had slunk away, had eroded over time.
Bearing witness is an act of love and a rebellion against that eternal asshole, time.
She wants to know that someone understands the magnitude of her loss, but who could? And at the same time, she doesn’t want to be defined by the unique conditions of her suffering.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Entropy: Why Life Always Seems to Get More Complicated”

Left to its own devices, life will always become less structured.
“The ultimate purpose of life, mind, and human striving: to deploy energy and information to fight back the tide of entropy and carve out refuges of beneficial order.” -Steven Pinker.
In the words of Yvon Chouinard, the founder of Patagonia, “The hardest thing in the world is to simplify your life because everything is pulling you to be more and more complex.”
Entropy helps explain many of the mysteries and experiences of daily life.
The collection of atoms that make up your body could be arranged in an infinite number of ways and nearly all of them lead to no form of life whatsoever.
In a universe where entropy rules the day, the presence of life with such organization, structure, and stability is stunning.
At the very least, life will not be optimal-maybe you didn’t grow up in the optimal culture for your interests, maybe you were exposed to the wrong subject or sport, maybe you were born at the wrong time in history.
Entropy provides a good explanation for why Murphy’s Law seems to pop up so frequently in life.
The difficulties of life do not occur because the planets are misaligned or because some cosmic force is conspiring against you.
Given the odds against us, what is remarkable is not that life has problems, but that we can solve them at all.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The human world is not more fragile now: it always has been”

How did we arrive at this moment in history, in which humanity is more technologically powerful than ever before, and yet we feel ourselves to be increasingly fragile? The answer lies in the long history of how we’ve understood the quintessence of ‘the human’, and the way this category has fortified itself by feeding on the fantasy of its own collapse.
Fears about the frailty of human wisdom go back at least as far as Ancient Greece and the fable of Plato’s cave, in which humans are held captive and can only glimpse the shadows of true forms flickering on the stone walls.
The philosopher Martha Nussbaum has long argued that an attempt to secure humans from fragility and vulnerability explains the origins of political hierarchies from Plato to the present; it is only if we appreciate our own precarious bodily life, and the emotions and fears that attach to being human animals, that we can understand and overcome racism, sexism and other irrational hatreds.
History suggests that the more we define ‘the human’ as a subject of intellect, mastery and progress – the more ‘we’ insist on global unity under the umbrella of a supposedly universal kinship – the less possible it becomes to imagine any other mode of existence as human.
The affirmation of basic human freedoms could become widespread moral concerns only because modern humans were increasingly comfortable at a material level – in large part thanks to the economic benefits afforded by the conquest, colonisation and enslavement of others.
A truly universal entitlement to security, dignity and rights came about only because the beneficiaries of ‘humanity’ had secured their own comfort and status by rendering those they deemed less than human even more fragile.
As the circle of humanity grew to capture the vulnerable, the risk that ‘we’ would slip back into a semi-human or non-human state seemed more present than before – and so justified demands for an ever more elevated and robust conception of ‘the human’.
The wasteland of Interstellar is one of resource depletion following human over-consumption; the world reduced to enslaved existence in Elysium is a result of species-bifurcation, as some humans seize the only resources left, while those left on Earth enjoy a life of indentured labour.
‘We’ have experienced an epoch of universal ‘human’ benevolence, a globe of justice and security as an aspiration for all, only by intensifying and generating utterly fragile modes of life for other humans.
This is why contemporary disaster scenarios still depict a world and humans, but this world is not ‘the world’, and the humans who are left are not ‘humanity’.

The orginal article.