Summary of “The New York Review of Books”

If Donald Trump’s nominee to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy, who announced his retirement on June 27, is confirmed by the Senate, the Supreme Court will have a stable majority of conservative justices for the first time since before the New Deal.
A federal court blocked the law, but its passage signals clearly that the Court will come under pressure to revisit Roe v. Wade.
Many Court observers, including Ginsburg, have suggested that it generated lasting controversy because the Court decided it without first laying the foundation with prior incremental decisions.
Just as liberals would no longer be able to rely on the Supreme Court to strike down anti-abortion measures, they would have to concentrate on winning elections and lobbying members of Congress to secure other rights that they are currently seeking to win in court.
In the Lochner era, so-called after a 1905 decision blocking a New York State maximum-hours law for bakers, the Court struck down much progressive state legislation as violating the liberty of contract, a right it found in the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.
It is what happened during the New Deal, when the justices’ resistance led Franklin Roosevelt to try to pack the Court.
Today’s Court enjoys more independence and public legitimacy than the Court that Roosevelt confronted did, and it is far from obvious that it would give in to Democratic pressure.
A durable conservative majority on the Supreme Court could impose substantial changes in American rights and law, especially in areas where liberals have in recent decades relied on courts and administrative agencies rather than Congress or state legislatures to implement progressive policies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Be Less Distracted With Your Kids”

You want to be more present for your children, to engage with them from a place of intention and connection rather than distraction and knee-jerk reactions.
Sometimes it’s hard because the present moment sucks.
Our responses to whatever is going on with our kids, whether it’s awesome or awful, will be more empathic and effective, and parenting will feel easier and more enjoyable when we’re fully present.
At the risk of stating the obvious, you just can’t be present for something if you’re trying to do something else at the same time.
Each time you do this, you’re making it just a little bit easier to stay present for whatever else shows up, including a meltdown in Aisle 2 at the grocery store.
While it’s possible to stay present while you’re racing through life, it’s not easy.
Finding something to appreciate requires you to get out of your spinning brain and back into the present moment, whether it’s ultra-absorbent diapers or the GPS tracking app on your son’s smartphone.
Each time you do this, you’re calming down your cranked up nervous system and bringing your awareness back to the present moment.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How language shapes our perception of reality”

Does an English speaker perceive reality differently from say, a Swahili speaker? Does language shape our thoughts and change the way we think? Maybe.
Some studies say that people don’t actually see color unless there is a word for it, but other studies have found that speakers of the Dani language can see the difference between yellow and red despite only having one word for them.
Because of the vocabulary, English speakers might organize things left to right, whereas a speaker of Guugu Yimithirr might orient them in a mirrored position.
The Hopi language doesn’t require past or present tense, but has validity markers, which requires speakers to think about how they came to know a piece of information.
One study conducted by Stanford researchers found that Spanish and Japanese speakers didn’t remember who is to blame for accidental events as much as those who speak English do.
English speakers get to the point in speech quicker than say, a Chinese speaker would, says Birner.
Tsedal Neeley, an associate professor at Harvard Business School, studied the company for five consecutive years after the mandate and discovered that employees who weren’t native Japanese speakers or English speakers proved to be the most effective workers in the end, even though they had it the roughest in the beginning.
If we believe that language shapes how we think, will learning a new language change the way you think? Probably not, says Birner, but if the newly acquired language is very different than the one you already speak, it might reveal a new way of looking at another culture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Ohio Startup Rebuilds Lives One Piece of Fried Chicken at a Time”

He wanted to accomplish this goal using a somewhat unusual product: spicy fried chicken.
“Fried chicken is this great equalizer of humanity,” DeLoss said recently as we sat in the crowded mezzanine overlooking Columbus’ North Market, where his flagship restaurant is located.
Neither of them had ever fried chicken before they bought a table-top fryer.
Hot Chicken promoted him quickly, so that by the time I met him in April he was a low-level manager earning $11 an hour plus tips.
Richard Mason, the employment specialist at House of Hope, has referred roughly 25 men to jobs at Hot Chicken over the years, and about six of them work there now.
Hot Chicken focuses on helping its employees stabilize their lives.
The first client Kindway referred to Hot Chicken was Shannon Wilson, a former heroin addict who started working at the restaurant three years ago and is now the company’s executive coordinator.
DeLoss’ ultimate goal is to expand Hot Chicken into a national chain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The King Has Landed: Making Sense of LeBron James in Purple and Gold”

Around the start of the 2017 NBA playoffs, executives and agents across the NBA began to increasingly discuss the possibility of LeBron James taking his talents to the Lakers after hitting free agency in 2018.
LeBron James agreed to a four-year, $154 million contract with the Lakers, Klutch Sports announced in a press release on Sunday night.
With LeBron officially agreeing to sign with the Lakers, it’ll be fascinating to monitor what type of leverage the Spurs can create for Kawhi Leonard, who still desires to play for the Lakers, according to multiple league sources-all of whom say offers to the Spurs have been underwhelming.
If the Lakers play hardball, it’ll be difficult for the Spurs to create any leverage if Leonard is indeed hell-bent on joining the Lakers by any means necessary.
If the Lakers take a power-play route, they can give LeBron something he has never had in his career: a contender that’s built to last.
If James brings the Lakers back and starts a new era of glory days in Los Angeles, it’s another notch in his column for the GOAT argument.
If LeBron wins a title or titles in Los Angeles, it’d mean that his team toppled the so-called inevitable Warriors dynasty in the most loaded conference in league history and then took down a formidable opponent in the East: Likely either the young, hungry Sixers or a Celtics team helmed by his former teammate in Kyrie Irving.
The Lakers ultimately provide LeBron with a world of upside: the chance to win another title with his third team in a new conference in a new era while guiding the most popular basketball franchise in the world back to the top of the league.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Games Disorder Explained”

The WHO told me that it began evaluating the public-health implications of excessive use of computers, smartphones, and the internet in 2014, in response to concerns from its community.
Despite those concerns, gaming disorder made it into the ICD-11 draft as the only “Clinically recognizable and clinically significant syndrome” related to the broader category of computing and the internet.
Some researchers wonder if the WHO might be under pressure to codify gaming disorder.
In 2017, an article in the journal Professional Psychology: Research and Practice argued that two members of the WHO advisory group, Geoffrey Reed and Vladimir Poznyak felt political pressure to identify gaming disorder, particularly from member states where the consequences of excessive online gaming have been particularly extreme.
“There was no pressure or any communication to the WHO s.ecretariat from any government with a suggestion to consider inclusion of gaming disorder in ICD-11,” a spokesperson told me – while also acknowledging that members of the organization’s constituency have repeatedly brought attention to their “Concerns about the health consequences of gaming behavior.”
If the overuse of games or smartphones are a matter of behavior, then of course that behavior is bound to vary by region, nation, culture, and other social conditions.
Unlike a viral infection or an autoimmune condition, a behavioral disorder is particularly susceptible to the varied social contexts in which the behavior takes place.
What about people who dance to excess, or become obsessed with tanning parlors, or while away hours tapping and swiping on Instagram, or even those who read novels-the source of a moral panic in the 18th century-or watch football to the detriment of their social and work lives? If the purpose of the DSM or ICD is to help people, and if only a very small percentage of gamers are compelled to the point of pathological overuse, and if what is pathological in the first place is subjective, then why not create a broader Behavioral Overuse Disorder that could apply to anything, without prejudice?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Let’s make private data into a public good”

All are designed to maximize the advantages of sticking with Google: if you don’t have a Gmail address, you can’t use Google Hangouts.
The bulk of Google’s profits come from selling advertising space and users’ data to firms.
Let’s not forget that a large part of the technology and necessary data was created by all of us.
The low tax rates that technology companies are typically paying on these large rewards are also perverse, given that their success was built on technologies funded and developed by high-risk public investments: if anything, companies that owe their fortunes to taxpayer-funded investment should be repaying the taxpayer, not seeking tax breaks.
Measuring the value of a company like Google or Facebook by the number of ads it sells is consistent with standard neoclassical economics, which interprets any market-based transaction as signaling the production of some kind of output-in other words, no matter what the thing is, as long as a price is received, it must be valuable.
There is indeed no reason why the public’s data should not be owned by a public repository that sells the data to the tech giants, rather than vice versa.
The key issue here is not just sending a portion of the profits from data back to citizens but also allowing them to shape the digital economy in a way that satisfies public needs.
Mariana Mazzucato is a professor in the economics of innovation and public value at University College London, where she directs the Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The TSA wants to scan your snacks”

Now, the Transportation Security Administration is coming for your snacks.
Passengers at airports across the country – including all three of the Washington region’s major airports – are reporting a rise in TSA agents instructing them to remove their snacks and other food items from their carry-ons and place them in those ubiquitous plastic bins for a separate screening.
The “Recommendation” appears to be gaining steam and moving rapidly into the territory of de-facto protocol, according to travelers who have received snack-related notices from their airlines, and who have been informed by rank-and-file TSA screeners that the snack checks are now standard practice.
Christina Saull, spokeswoman for the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, said that, so far, the new procedure has not led to longer wait times at either Reagan National or Dulles International airports.
“Of all the TSA rules, the arbitrarily enforced ‘dig every snack out of your bags’ is the dumbest,” tweeted Anne Keller after she encountered the snack screening at National.
The recommendation is gaining traction at smaller airports, too – in Boise, Idaho; Greenville, S.C.; and Manchester, N.H. “How bizarre,” tweeted Cindy Armstrong at Redmond Municipal Airport in Oregon.
“TSA asked me to take my snacks out of my bag and I feel personally victimized,” tweeted Thea Neal of Kansas City, Mo. When Neal, 29, a social-media manager for a greeting-card company, was asked to remove her snacks, she immediately panicked.
Happily, her snacks were returned after getting X-rayed in their separate bin.

The orginal article.

Summary of “GE’s Fall Has Been Accelerated by Two Problems. Most Other Big Companies Face Them, Too.”

The General Electric story, of a long-proud initial member of the Dow Jones Industrial Average falling out of that index – and appearing to be in competitive free fall – provides a powerful illustration of two effects we see throughout today’s corporate world: clueless, but deep-pocketed, activist investors and mergers and acquisitions folks masquerading as strategists.
During the Immelt era, the dominant mode had been of strategy by way of mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures, including most recently the disastrous merger of the GE oil and gas business with Baker Hughes in 2016.
In the fall of 2017 under Flannery, MA&D unsurprisingly became GE’s turnaround strategy tool.
The result is a boon for the private equity business, which gets to buy underperforming corporate divisions for a song and turn them around at a huge profit, and for the sellers of growth businesses, who get paid crazy multiples of earnings and sales for businesses that are purchased to generate growth for big companies that are, on their own, incapable of organic growth.
So on June 26, 2018, Flannery announced that GE was going to be fixed by doing more, and bigger, divestitures, this time spinning out the giant GE Healthcare and Baker Hughes businesses – and cutting costs some more.
Maybe a slimmed-down GE with only aviation, power, and renewable energy businesses will be able to focus on the strategy task of improving the customer competitiveness of that portfolio.
The happiest folks out there are probably GE Healthcare’s two big global competitors, Philips and Siemens Healthineers.
While GE Healthcare’s executives spend the next two years on carve-out audits, creating services and systems to replace the GE shared services, negotiating new stock-based compensation, and doing road shows for investors, Philips and Siemens executives will be focused on building their businesses at GE’s expense – an awesome window of opportunity for them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 50 best podcasts of 2018”

Stuart Goldsmith’s interview podcast sees top billing comedians give insights into how they bring out the laughs, whether it’s Katherine Ryan demonstrating her “Benevolent roast” or Shappi Khorsandi pinpointing her need to perform with a rant about her childhood.
Cariad Lloyd’s award-winning podcast about death is touching and, at times, downright hilarious, with guests including Sara Pascoe, Adam Buxton and David Baddiel.
Dry your eyes: there isn’t a new Streets album, but there is a Mike Skinner podcast.
Jonathan Zenti isn’t the most prolific podcaster and he admits that nothing will top his first episode, Host’s Fat, in which he talks about how he feels about being overweight.
He’s right: it’s one of the most incredible podcasts you’ll hear; full of honesty, raw emotion and an insight into why society has such a problem with people who take up more space in the world.
Good music podcasts are hard to come by, not least because you can’t really play music on a podcast for reasons of copyright.
After putting faux-advice podcast Mouth Time on ice last year, they’ve launched The Reductress Minute, a recap of the site’s best stories of the week, plus some all-time classics.
Dan Savage gives the best love and lust advice around in his distinctly NSFW podcast.

The orginal article.