Summary of “Want to Create Your Own Apps? Apple Will Teach You How to Code-for Free”

Maybe you have a cool app in mind that you would like to develop, but you don’t know whom to hire to code it, much less have the money.
No problem: For DIY types of people, Apple has released a free app development curriculum in the iBooks Store.
While the curriculum is designed for high school and community college students – and select schools will start offering the curriculum this fall – you don’t have to attend school to learn to code in Swift, Apple’s programming language.
In case you aren’t aware, you can also learn to code with Swift using Swift Playgrounds.
Granted, downloading a set of textbooks and teacher guides isn’t the same as taking classes; then again, for many people self-paced learning is the best kind of learning.
You can learn to code whenever you have time, not on someone else’s schedule.
The app economy is already huge, and the automation economy – and the need for the ability to, if not program, at least understand the technology and issues underlying automation programming – will grow exponentially in the years to come.
Plenty of people already do: According to Apple, Swift Playgrounds has been downloaded more than one million times, and the add-on “Everyone Can Code” has been downloaded nearly half a million times.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Silicon Valley Pushed Coding Into American Classrooms”

Computer science is also essential to American tech companies, which have become heavily reliant on foreign engineers.
Along the way, Code.org has emerged as a new prototype for Silicon Valley education reform: a social-media-savvy entity that pushes for education policy changes, develops curriculums, offers online coding lessons and trains teachers – touching nearly every facet of the education supply chain.
Code.org’s multilevel influence machine also raises the question of whether Silicon Valley is swaying public schools to serve its own interests – in this case, its need for software engineers – with little scrutiny.
Code.org is now one of the largest providers of free online coding lessons and more comprehensive computer science curriculums.
The rise of Code.org coincides with a larger tech-industry push to remake American primary and secondary schools with computers and learning apps, a market estimated to reach $21 billion by 2020.Last year, Apple rolled out a free app, called Swift Playgrounds, to teach basic coding in Swift, a programming language the company unveiled in 2014.Photo.
Mr. Partovi, for his part, was hoping to go viral with a message that coding could improve students’ job prospects.
Mr. Partovi noted that Code.org had opposed a “More extreme” coding bill in Florida that would have required students to obtain industry certification.
One of its first results was a new program, developed with Oracle, to train public-school teachers how to teach students Java, Oracle’s popular coding language.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Plot to Disrupt the NCAA with a Pay-for-Play HBCU Basketball League”

The way Schwarz and his HBCU league co-founders-Ohio-based sports and entertainment attorney Richard Volante and Washington, D.C.-based author and historian Bijan Bayne-see it, the NCAA is a bit like a traditional taxi company, while their concept is akin to Uber or Lyft.
The league would consist of at least 16 members drawn from the four current NCAA Division I and II HBCU conferences, institutions such as Howard University and Florida A&M; its athletes would be full-time students.
In the HBCU league, Schwarz says, athletes like De La Haye would be encouraged to market themselves.
A basketball league featuring the nation’s top collegiate talent-the future NBA players who currently attend schools like Duke University and the University of Kentucky-could provide a much-needed shot in the arm to HBCU athletics as a whole.
Schwarz says the proposed league also would dovetail with the HBCU mission to serve and support the African-American community.
Suppose North Carolina A&T joins a pay-for-play HBCU basketball league.
Most important, Schwarz says, a pay-for-play HBCU league will have a unique advantage over the NCAA, one that previous upstart sports operations such as the United States Football League have lacked.
Volante concedes, likely would put an HBCU league out of business.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Google Took Over the Classroom”

Although business practices like encouraging educators to spread the word to their peers have become commonplace among education technology firms, Google has successfully deployed these techniques on a such a large scale that some critics say the company has co-opted public school employees to gain market dominance.
Mr. Nelson, the former education official in Oregon, reported similar frustrations over student privacy when his state negotiated a contract with Google.
Mr. Bout of Google said that the tech company had “Always taken the compliance needs of our education users seriously.” He added that “Even early versions” of the company’s agreements for its education apps had “Addressed” the federal education privacy law.
Since adopting Google apps, Chicago schools have saved about $1.6 million annually on email and related costs, a district spokesman said.
Google then enlisted Mr. Tidmarsh, who now works in technology at a health care company, to share his enthusiasm by contributing to a Google blog.
In the post, Mr. Tidmarsh described creating 270,000 school Google accounts.
In 2012, as part of her effort to become a Google Certified Innovator in education, she said, she came up with the idea of having Chicago Public Schools hold a free conference – called Googlepalooza – to train teachers on Google’s tools.
In the fall of 2011, Google invited school administrators to its Chicago office to meet Mr. Casap, hoping to interest them in Chromebooks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Telling children ‘hard work gets you to the top’ is simply a lie”

“If you work hard, and do the right thing, you will be able to get on in life.” I believe that it is a promise that we have no capacity to fulfil.
You then continue on to yet another prestigious institution for your tertiary education, say Oxford or Cambridge University, and yet more quads with manicured lawns.
Then you end up in the oasis of Middle Temple working as a barrister: more manicured lawns and, yes, you guessed it, more quads.
The former trajectory, in some or all its forms, is much more likely to lend itself to a more successful life in Britain.
More leadership and more risk-taking are required on this front.
Your vocabulary and conjugation will give much more away, but never your accent, apart from regional perhaps.
We need to do more to double down on improving environments both at home and at school which continuously constrain potential.
If the adage that hard work truly matters rings true, then we must do more – at all levels of society – to make it a reality.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Check This Box if You’re a Good Person”

Every year I’d read over 2,000 college applications from students all over the world.
The problem is that in a deluge of promising candidates, many remarkable students become indistinguishable from one another, at least on paper.
The most surprising indication of kindness I’ve ever come across in my admissions career came from a student who went to a large public school in New England.
The custodian wrote that he was compelled to support this student’s candidacy because of his thoughtfulness.
This student, the custodian wrote, had a refreshing respect for every person at the school, regardless of position, popularity or clout.
It gave us a window onto a student’s life in the moments when nothing “Counted.” That student was admitted by unanimous vote of the admissions committee.
The way a student acts toward his parents on a campus tour can mean as much as a standardized test score.
Whether or not he even decides to go to college when the time is right, I want him to resemble a person thoughtful enough to return a granola bar, and gracious enough to respect every person in his community.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Prepare the Next Generation for Jobs in the AI Economy”

With the world becoming increasingly digital, computer science is as vital in the arts and sciences as writing and math are.
The number of students taking Advanced Placement exams in computer science is growing dramatically, but the 58,000 students taking the AP Computer Science A test last year still pales in comparison to the 308,000 who took the AP Calculus AB test.
Expanding computer science at the high school level not only benefits the students, but could help the field of computer science by encouraging more students – and a more diverse group of students – to consider computer science as a career.
We’re too often teaching programming as if it were still the 90s, when the details of coding were considered the heart of computer science.
Beyond 9th grade, we believe schools should provide electives such as robotics, computational math, and computational art to nurture students who have the interest and the talent to become computer scientists, or who will need computers to enhance their work in other fields.
These schools all boast committed faculty members who have a background or training in computer science.
A major hurdle is that our schools face a severe shortage of teachers who are trained in computer science.
As with science and math, we need governmental standards driving K-12 computer science education, along with textbooks, courses and ultimately a highly trained national cadre of computer science teachers that are tied to those standards.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Increasing Salaries So Teachers Don’t Have To Become Principals”

Spencer Campbell spends much of his days walking the halls of Elk Ridge Middle School, checking breezeways for kids playing hooky, redirecting foot traffic between classes and checking on substitute teachers.
“As a teacher I was making $43,000 a year and I had a part-time job where I would work another 20,” he says.
“There’s not a step in the ladder between teacher and administrator,” Campbell says.
“It’s just teacher. And administrator.”
“The problem is that there is a big disparity between what teachers make and a living wage in lots of places,” says Janice Voorhies, the president of the Jordan District school board where Campbell works.
The board recently approved a salary increase, including an additional $7,000 for beginning teachers.
In the meantime, classrooms will continue to lose teachers like Spencer Campbell.
“That’s one less amazing teacher a kid has.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Check This Box if You’re a Good Person”

Working in undergraduate admissions at Dartmouth College has introduced me to many talented young people.
Every year I’d read over 2,000 college applications from students all over the world.
The problem is that in a deluge of promising candidates, many remarkable students become indistinguishable from one another, at least on paper.
The most surprising indication of kindness I’ve ever come across in my admissions career came from a student who went to a large public school in New England.
The custodian wrote that he was compelled to support this student’s candidacy because of his thoughtfulness.
This student, the custodian wrote, had a refreshing respect for every person at the school, regardless of position, popularity or clout.
Over 15 years and 30,000 applications in my admissions career, I had never seen a recommendation from a school custodian.
It gave us a window onto a student’s life in the moments when nothing “Counted.” That student was admitted by unanimous vote of the admissions committee.
The way a student acts toward his parents on a campus tour can mean as much as a standardized test score.
Whether or not he even decides to go to college when the time is right, I want him to resemble a person thoughtful enough to return a granola bar, and gracious enough to respect every person in his community.

The orginal article.