Summary of “Christopher Nolan Gets Candid on the State of Movies, Rise of TV and Spielberg’s Influence – Variety”

There have been extensive doom-and-gloom scenarios about the demise of movies lately, but writer-director Christopher Nolan isn’t among those sounding the death knell.
Last summer, as the box office and attendance careened toward their lowest levels in decades, Nolan put his artistry where his optimism was – delivering a jolt of pure cinema with “Dunkirk.”
“At a time when there’s all kinds of storytelling around, movies that gravitate toward things that only movies can do carve out a place for themselves,” Nolan tells Variety during a wide-ranging interview at this year’s Toronto Film Festival.
With “Dunkirk,” Nolan has crafted a different kind of war film, one that owes more to kinetic thrillers like “Gravity” and “Mad Max: Fury Road” than to such classics of the genre as “Paths of Glory” or “Patton.” Instead of documenting vast troop movements or drilling into the intricacies of military strategy by cutting to shots of generals around a desk planning their next attack, Nolan drew an in-your-face portrait of war that zeroes in on the grunts pinned down against the ocean.
Viewing “Saving Private Ryan” helped Nolan understand how to differentiate “Dunkirk.”
With “Dunkirk,” Nolan delivers something tighter, tenser and more consuming.
“A scenario in which movies and television become more similar elevates television but diminishes movies.”Christopher Nolan.
Nolan likes seeing movies in the theater, hailing the communal experience of watching a story unfold with an audience.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Syracuse’s Jim Boeheim Is the Greatest Coach Who Never Fit the Part”

Jim Boeheim is one of the greatest college basketball coaches to ever live.
Boeheim, after all, has won 903 games as Syracuse’s head coach, placing him directly behind Mike Krzyzewski as the second-winningest Division I men’s coach of all time.
Unlike other top coaches who fit that description, Boeheim has never had much charisma or an intimidating presence demanding of respect.
Tyler Olander won more national championships in four years as a player than Boeheim has in 40-plus years as a coach.
It would be reckless to suggest that Boeheim will never coach a nationally relevant Syracuse basketball team again, but it also doesn’t take a wild imagination to envision a scenario in which that becomes the case.
On Page 2 of his 2014 autobiography, Bleeding Orange-Page 2!-Boeheim addresses his anxieties in length, writing that he has “a fear of failing every day.” He mentions how winning never makes him happy but losing always makes him sad. In recalling his national championship triumph in 2003, Boeheim writes, “Those feelings of euphoria lasted about two days, maybe three. Then it was time, once again, for worry. Time, once again, for fear.” His book is littered with memories of being slighted, including the time that Dave Schellhase took the roster spot on the 1966 Chicago Bulls that Boeheim felt he deserved.
Boeheim’s college head coach, Fred Lewis, went 91-57 in his tenure from 1962-68, with his greatest career achievement being that he convinced Bing to come to Syracuse.
Boeheim doesn’t fit the part of a legendary college basketball coach because he never fit the part.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Bike theft is not inevitable’: Vancouver rolls out a cycle crime revolution”

Today, a remarkable turnaround has taken place on Granville Island, which was at the time the worst spot in Canada’s worst city for bike theft.
Allard found a litany of barriers that have prevented meaningful action against bike theft: police are often burdened with other priorities, while stolen bikes can be sold online with impunity.
The first phase was a global app-based database of bikes geared to riders and police forces, intended to both discourage theft and aid the return of recovered bikes.
A turning point came when he was introduced to Brunt, the veteran Vancouver beat cop who was working on bike theft after being posted to light duty following an injury.
Together, the pair have turned Vancouver into a test case for a more comprehensive approach to stopping bike theft.
Across Vancouver, the number of bike thefts fell 20% in the first year the pair worked together.
“Cycling needs to be convenient, and there will always be some risk of theft, but what’s encouraging is they have demonstrated some very clear steps in reducing bike thefts,” Jane says.
If Allard can inspire his hometown police force to take the problem as seriously as Vancouver does, he thinks he can put a dent in the cross-border sales that fuel bike thefts in both cities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Remembering Toronto and Philadelphia’s Roy Halladay, 1977-2017”

On Tuesday, former Phillies and Blue Jays pitcher Roy Halladay died in a plane crash in the Gulf of Mexico.
Roy Halladay struck out nine and allowed one run in seven innings to earn the win.
Like Verlander, Halladay was a veteran pitcher at the top of his game, joining a team built on a potent and homegrown offense in search of the ring that had long eluded him.
In just his 11th start in a Phillies uniform, Halladay set down 27 consecutive Marlins for the first perfect game by a Phillies pitcher in 46 years.
Shortly thereafter, Halladay’s partnership with catcher Carlos Ruiz grew into a bromance that was visible from space - the stocky, light-hitting Panamanian, lovingly called “Chooch” by Phillies fans, became the mastermind behind the Phillies’ dominant pitching staff, a Sports Illustrated cover athlete, and Halladay’s lucky charm.
The most direct outgrowth of Halladay’s involvement was Zoo With Roy, a blog about a pseudonymous penguin who wanted to go to the Philadelphia Zoo with Roy Halladay.
A year later, the 102-win Phillies lost in the first round to the Cardinals in five games, with the final blow coming after the first batter Halladay faced in Game 5 scored the game’s only run.
I never met Roy Halladay, never high-fived him as a fan or interviewed him as a reporter, but he changed my life all the same.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Wild at heart: how one woman and her husband live out in the woods”

Miriam Lancewood has been living off grid, in the wild, for seven years now and she can still pinpoint the exact moment she knew she had truly broken with social norms.
Her husband, Peter, proudly tells me she could beat most men in a fight: “Miriam is the hunter and I’m the cook. She’s much stronger than me. Women are better shots,” he says.
It seems Miriam is not the only woman to think that women are missing out.
Miriam and Peter spent months training for that first winter in South Marlborough, New Zealand: long, demanding treks, first-aid courses; reading survival and foraging books – working out by the spoonful exactly how much flour, pulses, tea bags they’d need.
The question Miriam often gets asked by her readers is how they can afford to live as they do.
“They want to know how to do it.” As in, how to marry a woman 30 years younger? The age gap can be difficult to ignore; Miriam mentions it several times in her book, mainly because other people keep bringing it up.
Miriam and Peter often use the word “Trapped” to describe how other people live.
“You have to have a regular income. You have to settle down.” She laughs: “It scares me just thinking about it.” Miriam describes how men they do meet on their travels will often suddenly open up about their personal lives: “They say they wish their wives would come out hunting with them or if they had a choice again, they would never have children. That was the end of their freedom, they say.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “A unified theory of Taylor Swift’s reputation”

Swift announced her latest album, Reputation, by deleting all of her old social media posts, replacing them with a video of a snake hissing, in what appeared to be a reference to her reputation as a lying snake.
The video for her first single off Reputation, “Look What You Made Me Do,” concluded with a lineup of Swifts spouting the most common critiques of Taylor Swift at each other: Her surprised face is annoying and fake; she’s constantly playing the victim.
Since the beginning of her career, Swift’s celebrity image has been caught in a tug-of-war between intimacy and control, one characterized by two distinct identities: Taylor Swift, nerdy teen and girl next door, who just happens to naturally be able to give voice to your deepest feelings in her songs; and Taylor Swift, micromanaging CEO of a billion-dollar business whose marquee product is her own public image.
The resulting profile hit most of the beats of the traditional early Taylor Swift profile – her precocity, her wholesome blondness – but it lingered on one idea in particular: Swift’s persona insisted on a profound intimacy with her fans, on the idea that their feelings were her feelings and that there was no barrier between them.
The two poles of Swift’s persona have helped her successfully revamp her image with every new album cycle Every time Swift launches a new album, she tweaks her hair and her style and her talking points to suggest that there’s a new Taylor to go with the new sound.
Image building is the arena in which Taylor Swift the audience’s best friend and Taylor Swift the control freak have the ability to work together most seamlessly: The control freak watches the tides of public opinion and figures out exactly what kind of person it is that the world wants her to be, and then the best friend embodies it.
Swift works endlessly to control the gossip press, which helps boost her intimacy with fans One of the big criticisms of Taylor Swift is that she writes songs about her ex-boyfriends in what can be interpreted as petty acts of revenge.
In the end, they synthesize together into the form of naked robot Taylor – but actual Taylor Swift doesn’t seem to be willing or able to manage such a fusion.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core”

Fifteen months into a wide-ranging investigation by the agency’s counterintelligence arm, known as Q Group, and the F.B.I., officials still do not know whether the N.S.A. is the victim of a brilliantly executed hack, with Russia as the most likely perpetrator, an insider’s leak, or both.
There is broad agreement that the damage from the Shadow Brokers already far exceeds the harm to American intelligence done by Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor who fled with four laptops of classified material in 2013.Mr. Snowden’s cascade of disclosures to journalists and his defiant public stance drew far more media coverage than this new breach.
“Is NSA chasing shadowses?” the Shadow Brokers asked in a post on Oct. 16, mocking the agency’s inability to understand the leaks and announcing a price cut for subscriptions to its “Monthly dump service” of stolen N.S.A. tools.
Long known mainly as an eavesdropping agency, the N.S.A. has embraced hacking as an especially productive way to spy on foreign targets.
There were PowerPoint presentations and other files not used in hacking, making it unlikely that the Shadow Brokers had simply grabbed tools left on the internet by sloppy N.S.A. hackers.
N.S.A. employees say that with thousands of employees pouring in and out of the gates, and the ability to store a library’s worth of data in a device that can fit on a key ring, it is impossible to prevent people from walking out with secrets.
The third is Reality Winner, a young N.S.A. linguist arrested in June, who is charged with leaking to the news site The Intercept a single classified report on a Russian breach of an American election systems vendor.
American officials believe Russian intelligence was piggybacking on Kaspersky’s efforts to find and retrieve the N.S.A.’s secrets wherever they could be found.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Link Between Alcohol and Cancer? It’s Not Nearly as Scary as It Seems”

The absolute risks for that 40-year-old would go to 1.78 percent from 1.45 percent for the moderate drinker, and to 2.33 percent for the heavy drinker.
It found a harmful relationship between three of them and light drinking.
A 2013 meta-analysis in the Annals of Oncology that looked at all cancers found that, over all, light drinking was protective; moderate drinking had no effect; and heavy drinking was detrimental.
Randomized controlled trials of alcohol show that light to moderate drinking can lead to a reduction in risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and stroke.
These protective factors may be greater than all the other negative risk factors that might be associated with light or moderate drinking.
The absolute risks of light and moderate drinking are small, while many people derive pleasure from the occasional cocktail or glass of wine.
It’s perfectly reasonable even if a risk exists – and the overall risk is debatable – to decide that the quality of life gained from that drink is greater than the potential harms it entails.
A 30 percent increase in risk sounds scary, but an increase from 1 percent to 1.3 percent absolute risk does not, though these are the same things.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Nudge Me: The Limits of Behavioral Economics in Medicine”

At first glance, behavioral economics – the basis of Richard Thaler’s recent Nobel Prize in Economics – seems like a rich field of potential solutions.
Those excited about the potential of behavioral economics should keep in mind the results of a recent study.
It pulled out all the stops in trying to get patients who had a heart attack to be more compliant in taking their medication.
Getting patients to change their behavior is very hard.
In the past, we’ve tried making drugs free to patients to get them to adhere to their medications and improve outcomes.
We’ve tried lotteries to nudge people to achieve better compliance.
Maybe financial incentives, and behavioral economics in general, work better in public health than in more direct health care.
Behavioral economics may offer us some fascinating theories to test in controlled trials, but we have a long way to go before we can assume it’s a cure for what ails Americans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Coca-Cola, Netflix, and Amazon Learn from Failure”

In May, right after he became CEO of Coca-Cola Co., James Quincey called upon rank-and-file managers to get beyond the fear of failure that had dogged the company since the “New Coke” fiasco of so many years ago.
Even Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, arguably the most successful entrepreneur in the world, makes the case as directly as he can that his company’s growth and innovation is built on its failures.
Why, all of a sudden, are so many successful business leaders urging their companies and colleagues to make more mistakes and embrace more failures?
So what’s the right way to be wrong? Are there techniques that allow organizations and individuals to embrace the necessary connection between small failures and big successes? Smith College, the all-women’s school in western Massachusetts, has created a program called “Failing Well” to teach its students what all of us could stand to learn.
“What we’re trying to teach is that failure is not a bug of learning it’s the feature,” explained Rachel Simmons, who runs the initiative, in a recent New York Times article.
When students enroll in her program, they receive a Certificate of Failure that declares they are “Hereby authorized to screw up, bomb, or fail” at a relationship, a project, a test, or any other initiative that seems hugely important and “Still be a totally worthy, utterly excellent human being.” Students who are prepared to handle failure are less fragile and more daring than those who expect perfection and flawless performance.
In a presentation to other CEOs, Doyle described two great challenges that stand in the way of companies and individuals being more honest about failure.
Creating “The permission to fail is energizing,” Doyle explains, and a necessary condition for success – which is why he titled his presentation, with apologies to the movie Apollo 13, “Failure Is an Option.” And that may be the most important lesson of all.

The orginal article.