Summary of “Lower Income Could Affect Memory and the Brain for the Worse”

In the most recent of these papers, scientists found a link between being lower on the socioeconomic ladder and changes in the brain.
The researchers were looking for two things: first, how much gray matter the subjects had in their brains; second, how their brain networks were organized.
It’s generally considered to be a good thing for brain networks to be “Segregated” in this way.
The researchers then correlated those brain images with the subjects’ education and employment histories-together, their overall socioeconomic status.
Both measures are correlated with better memory and are considered protective against dementia and other signs of brain aging.
The stress of being low on the socioeconomic totem pole raises levels of allostatic load-a measure of stress hormones that cause wear and tear on the body, including the brain.
“It’s consistent with the idea that lifelong experiences might influence brain health.”
In the PNAS study, the relationship between socioeconomic status and the brain measures didn’t hold up for the very youngest adults or the very oldest adults in the sample.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Crush Them’: An Oral History of the Lawsuit That Upended Silicon Valley”

Just how similar were Microsoft’s actions two decades ago to what’s going on today? And how critical was the government’s lawsuit to unseating Microsoft from its perch of power to make room for a new crop of innovators? On the 20th anniversary of the filing of the Justice Department’s suit, we asked the lawyers who tried the case, the competitors who found themselves under Microsoft’s heel, and the journalists tasked with making sense of it all to recount tech’s most important legal battle, in their own words.
In August 1995, the same month Netscape went public, Microsoft released the first version of Internet Explorer.
IV. A Villain Is Born At a splashy press conference on May 18, 1998, Attorney General Janet Reno claimed that Microsoft had “Used its monopoly power to develop a choke hold on the browser software needed to access the internet.” That day the Department of Justice and 20 state attorneys general formally filed their complaint against Microsoft.
Michael Pettit: If there was a product that interfered with what Microsoft’s vision was, Microsoft employees would use language like let’s go “Knife the baby,” meaning let’s kill off that technology.
There’s a strong libertarian streak to Silicon Valley, and so that was kind of the master narrative that the Microsoft legal team was advancing.
Houck: If there hadn’t been the lawsuit or hadn’t been the [consent] decree, based on their past behavior, Microsoft very well might have done things that made it a lot more difficult for Google.
Microsoft might have learned a lesson and behaved in a more open or respectful way with competitors, but the whole industry moved to a world where the platform owner has more power than the platform owner ever presumed to have in the days of Microsoft.
The Microsoft case didn’t stop tech companies from amassing never-before-seen power.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Boost Your Retirement Fund With These Minor Lifestyle Changes”

Taking care of your health is an important part of your financial well-being-but you don’t need to make drastic changes to reap the benefits.
Turns out, simply following your doctor’s orders more closely could lead to a healthier retirement fund.
According to data recently analyzed by HealthyCapital, a 45-year-old man with a chronic condition like high blood pressure “Can save an average of $3,285 annually over his lifetime” by making adjustments like taking his medications as prescribed and cutting back on his sodium intake.
“To put this into perspective, if this person invested the annual savings into a typical retirement portfolio, he could generate an additional $100,348 for retirement by age 65,” the report finds.
A 45 year-old-man with diabetes who makes minor changes will save an estimated $2,788 a year in health care costs before retirement, totaling $86,117 if invested.
While the report uses a 45-year-old as the case study, it’s never too late to start taking better care of your health.
The report notes that “50 percent of Americans diagnosed with a chronic condition do not take their prescribed medication after six months,” which is especially true for people with high blood pressure because they may not physically notice results from taking their medication.
It may seem like common sense, but it drives home an important point: You have some control over your habits and your health, and simple changes can dramatically increase your standard of living.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout is on pace for the greatest season in MLB history”

Mike Trout started the game on the bench – his first day off of the season – and finished it with 3.51 WAR. The game’s best player was on pace to produce 14.2 wins above replacement.
It’s almost unimaginable – nobody has cracked 12 WAR in a half-century, and no active player has ever WAR’d higher than 2016 Trout’s 10.5 – but it’s time to take seriously the possibility that we’re watching the greatest season of all time.
Trout is on pace to draw 143 walks, which would match Joey Votto’s 2015 season for the most since Bonds.
Only two batters have chased fewer pitches out of the strike zone than Trout has this season.
Probably my favorite hitless Trout game of the season so far.
Just how good is Mike Trout? He’s so good, it took three rounds of swapping astounding stats to decide which numbers best cement his growing stature in baseball history.
If not for that double play or that fly out, Trout very well might have batted as the winning run, the best hitter in baseball getting the chance to win it, the best-case scenario for the Angels.
Mike Trout is to every other inner-circle baseball superstar what Babe Ruth’s 1923 season was to Babe Ruth’s discography: the best and somehow also easy to overlook.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Next Time You Want to Complain at Work, Do This Instead”

I had been on the phone for over an hour, almost all of that time listening to Frank*, a senior manager at Jambo, a technology company, complain about his boss, Brandon.
I added up all the time I’d spent listening to people at Jambo complain about each other that week: 3 hours and 45 minutes.
My friend, the legendary executive coach Marshall Goldsmith, interviewed more than 200 of his clients and what he discovered matched previous research he read, but found hard to believe: “a majority of employees spend 10 or more hours per month complaining – or listening to others complain – about their bosses or upper management. Even more amazing, almost a third spend 20 hours or more per month doing so.”
When we complain about someone else, the uncomfortable feelings begin to dissipate because complaining releases the pent up energy.
When we complain to people who seem to agree with us – and we almost always complain to people who seem to agree with us – we solicit comfort, camaraderie, connection, support, and justification, which counteracts the bad feelings with some fresh, new good ones.
We almost never complain directly to the person who is catalyzing our complaints, we complain to our friends and families.
Then you go to the next meeting and you complain about the person who just yelled.
Let complaining – and the feeling that leads to complaining – be the red flag that it should be: something wrong is happening and you are probably not powerless to do something about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Amazon cuts Whole Foods prices for Prime members in new grocery showdown”

Amazon.com Inc and Whole Foods Market are making a surgical strike in the already brutal grocery price war.
On Wednesday, Whole Foods debuted a much-anticipated loyalty program that offers special discounts to Prime customers, including 10 percent off hundreds of sale items and rotating weekly specials such as $10 per pound off wild-caught halibut steaks.
Amazon previously announced free two-hour delivery from Whole Foods stores for members of Prime, its subscription club with fast shipping and video streaming.
The new loyalty strategy will test whether Amazon’s $13.7 billion deal for Whole Foods brings much-feared disruption and an intensified price war to the $800 billion U.S. grocery industry dominated by Walmart Inc and Kroger Co. Whole Foods, with 463 U.S. stores and roughly 1 percent share of the fragmented U.S. grocery market, has gained momentum since the Amazon merger last summer, Whole Foods co-founder and Chief Executive John Mackey told Reuters.
Still, Philadelphia-area Whole Foods shopper and Prime member Heather Kincade, 46, is going to need convincing.
LOWER MARGINS. In Amazon, Whole Foods has found an owner that is famously comfortable spending away profits on new businesses or on lower prices.
“Given how important it is for Amazon to provide value for their customers, and customers value lower prices, I would think they’d be comfortable operating Whole Foods at a lower margin while experimenting with the operating model,” said Tom Furphy, former vice president of consumables and AmazonFresh, and now chief executive of Consumer Equity Partners.
CEO Rodney McMullen told Reuters earlier this month that the chain’s prices will “Absolutely” be lower than Whole Foods on the typical shopper’s basket of about 50 items per week.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Sixers, the Celtics, and the Next Era of the NBA”

Both teams had a shot to land the Lakers pick, so they shoehorned Celtics president Rich Gotham next to Sixers representative Elton Brand.
As recently as three weeks ago, the idea for this column was something along the lines of “Welcome to your fresh new hell, America.” With the Sixers facing the Celtics in the second round, it seemed like a preview of the Eastern Conference finals for the next five years, with the fan bases from both teams happily battling each other and annoying the rest of the league along the way.
In retrospect, after the Celtics dispatched the Sixers in five games despite not having their two best players, I feel a little less fuzzy.
Unlike the Sixers, the Celtics are guaranteed to add two more All-Stars to an already-loaded team when Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward return next season.
If the Sixers are in good shape, it would appear that the Celtics are in great shape.
Which only makes it harder to look at what the Celtics have going forward and think the Sixers still need more if they want to keep up in what figures to be a long, intense race.
No one can be certain what the Sixers will get out of him or if he’ll return to form-even if the Sixers front office might like to pretend otherwise.
The Celtics lost their two best players and still motored to the conference finals; if the Sixers blew out two tires, they’d be back in the lottery repair shop.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is How a Newspaper Dies”

For a preview of the newspaper industry’s coming death, turn your gaze to Colorado, where the withering and emaciated Denver Post finds itself rolling in profits.
For newspaper lovers, the cuts have been a disaster.
Why on Earth should Smith sell? Alden’s newspapers recorded nearly $160 million in profits during fiscal year 2017, analyst Ken Doctor reported in a comprehensive piece recently at NeimanLab.
Your grandfather is a pretty good stand-in for the average newspaper subscriber, too.
Habituated to his morning newspaper, he’ll resist cancelling his subscription no matter how raggedy the paper gets or how high the owners jack up the price.
“The old model of a general-purpose newspaper fit the industrial age when advertisers needed mass audiences to sell the products of mass production. But the marketplace no longer supports the model of a few messages to many people. Now it is many messages, each to a few people,” Meyer tells me via email.
Why pin exclusive blame on Smith for the demise of the Denver Post when there’s plenty of blame to go around? In 2008, then-Detroit News reporter Charlie LeDuff spotted another villain in the rot and decay of his newspaper as it downsized to three days a week of home delivery.
It’s not like the newspaper industry didn’t have advance warning of its demise.

The orginal article.

Summary of “From top sprinter to homeless in London”

I first met Jimmy Thoronka in a London park in March 2015.
West Africa was then in the grips of the deadly Ebola crisis and, fearing for his life, Jimmy had overstayed his visa, travelling south from Glasgow to London.
I called the president of Sierra Leone’s athletics association, Abdul Karim Sesay, who told me Jimmy was a very gifted athlete “And an all-round nice guy. Everybody likes him. He’s not just a sprinter – he’s Sierra Leone’s number one 100m sprinter. He has the potential to be one of the best in the world.”
We knew there was a risk that the publicity would bring him to the Home Office’s attention, but Jimmy had accepted that, saying, “What other options do I have?”.
Oliver Oldman, a solicitor at the London firm Bindmans, agreed to represent him, and advised Jimmy to apply for leave to remain rather than asylum.
This seemed more likely to succeed, though it meant Jimmy had to move out of his Home Office accommodation and was homeless once more.
The University of East London made inquiries with the Home Office: could Jimmy begin his studies? The answer was a curt no, not until his immigration status was regularised – a punitive decision that left Jimmy deflated.
Jimmy is still hoping to embark on a degree – in computer studies – at the University of East London in September.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Lesson of Eric Greitens, and the Navy SEALs Who Tried to Warn Us”

A former Navy SEAL who was once a rising star in the Republican Party, Greitens is now fighting allegations of sexual coercion, blackmail, invasion of privacy, and misuse of charity resources to fund his campaign.
In 2016, before Greitens was elected, a group of mostly anonymous current and former SEALs tried to sound the alarm about why they thought he was unfit for office.
After the killing of Osama bin Laden by SEAL Team Six in a 2011 raid, Navy SEALs became full-blown celebrities, and Greitens rode that fame to speaking tours, a spot on Time magazine’s 2013 “100 Most Influential People” list, and, eventually, the governor’s mansion.
Greitens avoided telling outright lies about his service or engaging in the kind of political commentary that other SEALs embraced-from the Fox News contributor Benjamin Smith calling Obama a Muslim to Carl Higbie’s use of racist, sexist, anti-Muslim, and anti-gay remarks during his time as a right-wing radio host.
The animus some SEALs felt toward Greitens flared in 2015, after he resigned from his position at The Mission Continues and announced his candidacy for governor in the Missouri Republican primary.
In one campaign ad, Greitens fires an assault rifle at a target that then explodes, and the words “Conservative. Navy SEAL” appear next to his face.
Incensed, Holzer and his fellow Navy SEAL Drago Dzieran appeared on Dana Loesch’s radio show to complain about Greitens’s use of SEAL iconography, and to demand that he “Run on his own record, not on the record of SEALs.” In March of that year, sixteen former and active SEAL team members involved with the video spoke out against Greitens in the Missouri Times, again anonymously.
Congressman Ryan Zinke, the current Secretary of the Interior and a former SEAL Team Six commander, called him “a highly decorated combat veteran with a proven record of leading from the front.” Rob O’Neill, the SEAL Team Six operator who claims to have shot Osama bin Laden, praised Greitens as a “Combat leader,” spoke at his rallies, and offered signed versions of the ISIS bumper stickers in exchange for a hundred-dollar donation to the Greitens campaign.

The orginal article.