Summary of “David Chang’s Culinary Universe Is Still Growing”

AS AT ALL David Chang restaurants, the kitchen at Majordōmo-the first Los Angeles outpost in Chang’s Momofuku culinary empire-is open to the dining room.
TABLE TALK “How do you appreciate someone else’s culture?” says David Chang.
David Chang was sick of the notion that great cooking was the exclusive province of fine dining, so he changed the whole industry.
First, Chang offers a mea culpa to Richard Hargreave, Momofuku’s director of food and beverage special projects, about how his willful ignorance hurt his restaurants’ wine lists: “What I’ve realized is, I don’t know shit. I’m glad that we get to work with you.” Later, with Parra-Sickels, who cooked at Momofuku Ssäm Bar and Momofuku Noodle Bar before moving back to his native L.A., Chang reflects on his monomaniacal early years: “If I could go back in time, I’d beat the shit out of myself. I was like, ‘What? How could you f-ing leave? To start a family? What are you doing?’ I was so f-ing naive. I had no idea.”
One difference between Chang the Bad Boy and Chang the Emerging Elder Statesman is that, through empathy and life experience, he understands those concerns now.
Chang’s first review in the New York Times in 2005 said, “Momofuku occupies the realm of deeply personal restaurants defined by one person’s vision and drive.” Today, Chang remains a presence, albeit a somewhat withdrawn one, in the kitchens even as he attends to corporate matters and his media ventures.
“And it’s only now after Tony passed that some of that has weighed quite heavily on me.” The sudden loss of Anthony Bourdain, whom Chang has called a sage, an oracle, a mentor and “My North Star,” left Chang reeling.
Still wrestling with the impact of Bourdain’s suicide in June, Chang was inspired to open up on his podcast about his own mental health issues and later his struggles with severe workaholism.

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Summary of “Can Baking Reduce Stress and Anxiety?”

Young Americans’ long work hours might mean they’re less likely to come home every night in time to roast a chicken instead of ordering takeout, but many of them seem to have turned to weekend baking as a salve for the ambient anxiety of being alive in 2018.
There’s a good reason for that: Baking actually can be really relaxing.
“We’re at a time when people who aren’t used to any self-care practices are having to develop them for the first time in their lives,” Kat Kinsman, a food journalist who’s written a book on her struggles with anxiety, told me.
“People are afraid to spend money, and they’re feeling like shit. Baking is cheap, it’s easy, and it’s visceral.”
That combination of attributes brought Kinsman back to baking while in grad school for metalworking, years after she had taken it up as a quiet, nerdy kid in order to offer treats to friends.
Folu Akinkuotu, a 28-year-old who lives in Boston and works in e-commerce-and someone whose impressive off-hours baking exploits I follow on social media-also started baking more in college as a way to make friends during her freshman year.
“It’s nice to be able to bake and know that I’m creating something that has a beginning and an end and people can enjoy it,” she says.
“A lot of people have jobs that traffic in ideas or theoretical things, so it’s nice to make physical things.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sherrod Brown Wants to Bring a Working-Class Ethos Back to the Democratic Party”

Sherrod Brown, the liberal Democratic senator from Ohio, has often seemed a politician from the radio era, with a baritone thick with particulate matter, suits whose pressed lines disintegrate as the day wears on, and curly gray hair that can swell into an accidental bouffant.
The press, the Party, its donors, the amateur strategists toying with electoral maps in their browsers-everyone discovered Sherrod Brown as a Presidential candidate at once.
“He’d gone into Youngstown and made those very specific promises.” Brown asked the President to talk with Barra, to try to keep the plant from closing, but Trump didn’t commit to it.
Brown grew up in Mansfield, Ohio, midway between Columbus and Cleveland, within the professional class.
On the bleak Election Night in 2016, watching the returns at home with a few family members, aides, and friends, Brown declared that negotiating with Trump on trade was possible.
As Sherrod Brown becomes a national figure, his trudging approach to politics is evolving into a brand, much as Bernie Sanders’s did, a few years ago.
The field of potential Democratic candidates is thick with current and former senators should he run, Brown might soon find himself being attacked by his colleagues and friends.
“Going back to Pope Francis, he admonishes parish priests early in his papacy to go out and smell like the flock,” Brown said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My year of reading African women, by Gary Younge”

Feeling it was time to fix my radar, I decided, when it came to fiction, to read only African women for a year.
“It used to be just a few writers published mostly as part of an educational series,” explains Margaret Busby, editor of Daughters of Africa, the landmark anthology of writing by women of African descent, which came out in 1992.
“Until you can no longer count the number of African women writers who have broken through then we’ve still got work to do,” says Busby, whose sequel, New Daughters of Africa, comes out next year.
With the year almost up I have read 18 books by authors from Morocco, Ghana, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Senegal, Egypt, Somalia, Uganda, Ethiopia and Cameroon.
In his satirical 2006 Granta essay, How to Write About Africa, Binyavanga Wainaina advises: “Never have a picture of a well-adjusted African on the cover of your book, or in it, unless that African has won the Nobel prize … Taboo subjects: ordinary domestic scenes, love between Africans, references to African writers or intellectuals, mention of school-going children who are not suffering from yaws or Ebola fever or female genital mutilation.”
A pecking order emerges among wives and children, in a range of abusive relationships between men and women, women and women and women and their children, producing rivalries that propel plots.
Somewhere deep in my subconscious I must have decided that books by African women would be harder than those by some other demographics.
On some level I must have had reading African women down as self-improving but not necessarily enjoyable, when in fact it was mostly the latter and often both.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Influencers Are Faking Brand Deals”

When Allie, a 15-year-old lifestyle influencer who asked to be referred to by a pseudonym, scrolls through her Instagram feed, sometimes the whole thing seems like an ad. There’s a fellow teen beauty influencer bragging about her sponsorship with Maybelline, a high-school sophomore she knows touting his brand campaign with Voss water.
“People pretend to have brand deals to seem cool,” Allie said.
“In the influencer world, it’s street cred,” said Brian Phanthao, a 19-year-old lifestyle influencer in San Diego who sees fake ads all over Instagram.
Phanthao said most of the people he sees doing it grew up watching influencers and now aspire to their lifestyle.
“They’re very influenced by influencers.” At first he was astounded that brands he recognized would partner with some of the people he saw on his feed.
Evans said staging these fake promotions “Makes you seem like you’re in a position to be getting things for free, which helps you build your brand or media kit It makes you seem more established, like you have brands that you’re working with. That means you’re producing good content and you’re worthy of approaching and offering these opportunities to.”
A lifestyle influencer who posts under the name Trendy Ambitious Blonde, posted a photo of herself with a Betsey Johnson bag she purchased with her own money and tagged the company, she was featured on its website.
The owner of one sunglasses brand, who asked to remain anonymous so as not to alienate anyone in the influencer community, said the practice has put him in a tough position as a stream of mid-level influencers post mediocre-quality sponsored content seemingly on his behalf, without his approval or control.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When will electric airliners make sense?”

There are companies that are planning to develop electric passenger aircraft.
So who’s being realistic? To find out, an international team has done an evaluation of whether battery-powered electric aircraft can become viable and when it’s possible they’ll reach the market.
Assuming these electric aircraft could be built, would they actually lower emissions? At present, no.
Given the average emissions involved with powering the US grid, the emissions involved with powering an electric aircraft would be about 20 percent higher than those generated by a modern, efficient jet engine.
Once the additional warming effects of aircraft are taken into consideration, the electric aircraft comes out ahead by about 30 percent.
Assuming future solar production leads to a discount on electric use during the day, it could help the economics of electric aircraft; currently, they only make sense economically with fuel at about $100/barrel.
The authors estimate that an effective range of about 1,100 kilometers would allow electric aircraft to cover 15 percent of the total air miles and nearly half the total flights.
Upping the range to 2,200 kilometers would allow 80 percent of the global flight total to be handled by electric aircraft.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Still have your childhood teddy? The psychological power of the toys we keep”

The origins of Ann Bradley’s Teddy are lost in family lore – it was a gift from either her mother or her grandmother – but she has gone on to comfort the 58-year-old from Swindon, as well as her daughter and now her new granddaughter.
The transition in Winnicott’s “Transitional object” refers to the shift every infant must make, as he wrote, “From a state of being merged with the mother to a state of being in relation to the mother as something outside and separate”.
A transitional object tends to be chosen in the first six months of life and to have qualities reminiscent of the mother: it is soft; it can be stroked, cuddled and bitten; and, on a symbolic level, it links to maternal care.
Possessions such as Chris’s Boo-Boo help an infant to navigate the experience of difference and separation from the mother, inside whom they spent the first nine months of their existence, so that one can become two.
“Because my mother couldn’t afford a teddy bear, one of her nursing colleagues made Ted out of the only material she had – a kind of green hessian, with black felt eyepatches. At present, he looks very dishevelled.” He has been in Graham’s life for seven decades: “He was a very, very significant part of my childhood for a while and he’s part of me.”
Ted still represents “Stability and durability. Things may change, but he won’t – and that’s still a source of comfort when times are difficult.”
Her grandmother packed a couple of cotton saris in her suitcase and Roulet’s mother cut out a large square for her to take to bed.
“Even Chris, who lost his Boo-Boo before he was five, still carries a tissue around in his pocket and touches it for comfort from time to time. As our conversation is about to come to an end, he is suddenly startled by a memory.”It just flashed in front of me,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Google Tracks Your Personal Information”

It started in the early 2000s, when people-in return for having access to Google products and seeing more relevant ads-allowed Google to have all their data.
Today, Google provides marketers like me with so much of your personal data that we can infer more about you from it than from any camera or microphone.
Back in December 2008, Hal Roberts, a fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard, spoke about Google Ads as a form of “Gray surveillance.” Roberts described Google as “a system of collective intelligence” that, along with marketers, hoarded and exploited your data.
I will explain, in everyday language, how Google and Google Ads work “Under the hood” to track your data.
Then I will expose, from an insider’s perspective, what the vast majority of the public doesn’t know: how Google Ads is abused by search engine marketers and how people are essentially bought and sold through this platform.
I will cover what Google has tried to do to fix Google Ads.
Google users would not be so forthright with the search engine if they understood how far down this rabbit hole goes.
With the insider information I will provide, I hope readers can return to a place where Google is not the only option available to tell their fears, regrets, hopes, and dreams.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emergency room bills: what I learned from reading 1,182 ER bills”

For the past 15 months, I’ve asked Vox readers to submit emergency room bills to our database.
I’ve read emergency room bills from all 50 states and the District of Columbia.
I’ve even submitted one of my own emergency room bills for an unexpected visit this past summer.
Since we started this project, multiple senators have introduced bills to prevent surprise emergency room bills – including one directly inspired by our project.
I’ll stop collecting emergency room bills on December 31.
According to GoodRX, a website that tracks drug prices, an entire vial of this drug can be purchased at a retail pharmacy for between $15 and $50. This is something that I saw over and over again reading emergency room bills: high prices for items that a patient could have picked up at a drugstore.
As many as 34 percent of emergency room visits lead to out-of-network bills in Texas – way above the national average of 20 percent.
4) It is really hard for patients to advocate for themselves in an emergency room setting Since I started working on this project, one of the questions I get most frequently is: How do I avoid a surprise ER bill? Or how can I get my ER bill lowered?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can we cheat ageing?”

BBC World Service podcast The Inquiry quizzed some of the world’s leading researchers about the nature of ageing – and about the cutting-edge science that could ‘cure’ it, from the role of microbiomes to 3D-printed organs.
Watching her grow older, all while remaining sound, made Wang wonder about the secrets of ageing.
As cells gets older, they divide to replace cells that are dying or getting worn out, but this is not a perfect process.
“It’s almost like the cell saying ‘I’m an old cell and you guys have been around here about the same sort of amount of time as I have, so you must be old too’,” says Lorna Harries, professor of molecular genetics at England’s University of Exeter.
These senescent cells are almost ‘contaminating’ other cells with age and as we grow older, more and more of our cells become senescent until our body is overwhelmed.
To test the skin cell’s age when the experiment ran its course, they applied a particular dye that would turn cells blue if they were senescent.
The experiment effectively rejuvenated old cells and turned them into young cells, making hers the first experiment ever to have reversed ageing in human cells.
Perhaps one day we will be able to replace our damaged organs, take supplements that give us a youthful microbiome and stop our cells from ageing.

The orginal article.