Summary of “Warren Buffett’s best investing advice for beginners”

This was Warren Buffett’s response, on his 87th birthday, when asked about his best investment advice.
Well, fortunately you can learn from investors who DO have experience – investors like Warren Buffett himself.
Warren Buffett says that the best investment one can make is on his/her own abilities.
Warren Buffett says that many people think quite a bit before making any investment – and sometimes think TOO much.
One of the best investment tips from Warren Buffett is to not put too much stock into each and every news headline that you see.
You might be astonished to know that even Warren Buffett makes mistakes – big ones too.
According to Buffett, the secret to getting a better return on investment is to buy a stock and forget about it.
There are two principles behind this: if you buy a stock for less than it’s true worth, the stock’s price will eventually converge with it’s intrinsic value; and if you buy a wonderful business, the value of that business will compound and increase exponentially the longer you hold on to it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Science is a public good in peril”

The rise of the 20th-century research university in the United States stands as one of the great achievements of human civilisation – it helped to establish science as a public good, and advanced the human condition through training, discovery and innovation.
While there is virtually no research exploring the precise impact of perverse incentives on scientific productivity, most in the academic world would acknowledge a shift towards quantity in research.
Warnings of systemic problems go back to at least 1991, when the NSF director Walter E Massey noted that the size, complexity and increased interdisciplinary nature of research in the face of growing competition was making science and engineering ‘more vulnerable to falsehoods’.
The NSF defines research misconduct as intentional ‘fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism in proposing, performing, or reviewing research, or in reporting research results’.
Since 1975, in life science and biomedical research, the percentage of scientific articles retracted has increased tenfold; 67 per cent of the retractions were due to misconduct.
From climate science to galvanic corrosion, we have seen research published that denigrates the scientific ethos, and undermines the credibility of the scientific community and everyone in it.
We can openly acknowledge and address problems with perverse incentives and hypercompetition that are distorting science and imperilling scientific research as a public good.
Fourth, universities can take measures immediately to protect the integrity of scientific research, and announce steps to reduce perverse incentives and uphold research misconduct policies that discourage unethical behaviour.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple Is Ramping Up Work on AR Headset to Succeed iPhone”

Apple Inc., seeking a breakthrough product to succeed the iPhone, aims to have technology ready for an augmented-reality headset in 2019 and could ship a product as early as 2020.
As with previous products, Apple isn’t waiting around for someone else to create a chip capable of powering its AR headset.
Just as tvOS powers the Apple TV, macOS runs on Macs and watchOS runs on Apple Watches, “rOS” will power Apple’s AR headset.
Apple hasn’t finalized how users will control the headset and launch apps, but is investigating touch panels, voice-activation via Siri and head gestures.
The company has discussed pairing the headset with its own version of the App Store, where users would be able to download content, just as they do with the iPhone, Watch, Apple TV and Mac.
Because Apple doesn’t have a fully operational headset of its own, engineers have begun using HTC Vive headsets for testing purposes.
Apple doesn’t plan to sell the gadget but instead aims to use it internally to test AR apps next year.
With the headset at least two years away, Apple wants to make it easier for developers to bring new AR features to the iPhone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Secret Life of Live Mascots”

See what life is like off the field for these living symbols of school pride.
Bevo XV took over the job in 2016, the centennial celebration of a live longhorn’s first game appearance, at the 1916 Texas A&M contest, replacing the previous mascot, a pit bull terrier named Pig.
That’s good for only the second-heaviest live mascot.
“We never make her do anything she doesn’t want to,” explains John Graves, CU’s live mascot program manager.
His new home is an obvious improvement over the living quarters of his predecessors, who have lived adjacent to Tiger Stadium since 1936.
In 1924, head cheerleader Vic Huggins decided his school needed a live mascot to compete with rivals such as NC State, which at the time would trot out a live wolf for games.
“You’d be doing well to be living this ol’ boy’s life right here,” says Don Basnight, Hogan’s grandson, as he pets Rameses XXII with one hand and slips him a handful of sheep feed with the other.
Unlike some live mascots, Rameses’ location is no secret.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The New Margaret Atwood Adaptation Explores The Real Horror Of Patriarchy”

Alias Grace, Netflix’s new six-episode adaptation of the novel by Margaret Atwood, opens in a way that’ll make you think you’re watching Masterpiece Theater: credits running over images of household objects and faded drawings, paired with a mournful violin score.
In The Handmaid’s Tale, Hulu’s recent Emmy-winning adaptation of another Atwood novel, patriarchy is stretched to a dystopian dimension, with fertile women made to serve as childbearing chattel for those in power.
Atwood first wrote about Grace Marks – who became a vivid fixture in the Canadian imaginary over the course of her trial – in The Journals of Susanna, a poetry collection published in 1970.
In 1997, Atwood returned to Grace Marks with Alias Grace, approaching her story through the plot device of a fictional doctor, newly enlightened by the nascent principles of psychology, attempting to determine whether or not Grace had indeed committed the murders or was subject to momentary insanity.
Alias Grace becomes a meditation on the way true crime narratives are formed, but it also explodes the existing narrative around Grace herself.
Without giving away any spoilers, it’s clear that Grace has sublimated the rage of living under patriarchy, but it’s unclear how, exactly, that manifested – and whether psychology is even equipped to understand the complex processes that occur over the course of decades of repressed trauma.
While it’s happenstance that Alias Grace willenter public consciousness amid an avalanche of allegations against men who have exploited their power to abuse, harass, or otherwise violate women, those allegations and Alias Grace are simply two different vantages of the same reality – in which patriarchy is never not in the process of finding ways to sustain itself.
As both Alias Grace and the specifics of recent stories from accusers make clear, men and women alike become ready accessories to interactions, relationships, and ideologies that keep patriarchy in place.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Thank You for Your Undivided Attention”

You walk out the door-you don’t remember if you remembered to say bye or not.
You tap them twice and whisper into them as the instructor yells out instructions.
You forgot to do it yesterday because you ran out of time.
You’d better use the meeting time efficiently to do other stuff.
You spend most of the time talking shit over Google Hangouts Messenger about the other people in the room to Sean.
You are able to pass the time by passively listening to what’s going on, and being entertained.
Something about getting out of a bad relationship and working in start-ups.
Need to plan ahead, because this is just not going to work out.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to get Oprah to say your name, and other life lessons from writer-comedian H. Alan Scott”

A series of interesting conversations with interesting people.
H. Alan Scott’s goal is to tell people stories, make them laugh, and to leave them with a perspective they hadn’t considered before.
We caught up with H. Alan to chat about all of the above, when he’s able to take a break for Bar Mitzvah planning, and what he’s been finding interesting on the web lately.
How did you get into comedy and writing in the first place?I was always a funny kid, and obsessed with Johnny Carson and funny daytime talk shows like The Rosie O’Donnell.
Before the show they let me do a weird set where I got the audience to say my name, “H.” So when I stood up to ask my question, the audience went, “H.” Shirley asked, “What’s H?” I said, “H. Alan Scott,” which promoted Oprah to say, “H. Alan Scott,” which prompted me to die right there on the spot.
Of course I choose how much I share, but I use my life as the basis for my work.
How do you decide what to write about next? And what impression do you hope to leave with your readers and the internet as a whole?My goal with everything I write is for the reader to be left with a perspective they maybe haven’t thought about before, or a fresh take on something.
If you had the chance to escape and read all of your current Pocket saves where would you go to do it?Palm Springs, on a couch, looking at people from the AC.Who would you want to see us interview next?Zach Stafford is the editor-in-chief of Grindr’s new magazine, INTO, and he’s the smartest most brilliant writer I know.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet The Riders Of The Sikh Motorcycle Club Of The Northeast”

In Skip Hollandsworth’s 2007 story about the notorious Texan motorcycle club the Bandidos, he notes, “They defend one another. They watch each other’s backs. That’s part of the brotherhood.” But that model of displaying loyalty – often through violence and a decidedly us vs. them mentality – is a world away from the ethos of the bikers who make up the Sikh Motorcycle Club of the Northeast.
Although motorcycle riders are required by law to wear a helmet in New York state, for the past six years club riders have traveled in the parade at a leisurely pace with nothing on their heads but their hair and their turbans.
So he shows them that a slice of wholehearted Americana joy can be theirs; he cuts through the Catskill Mountains on a Harley Davidson on the last day of summer, leather vest emblazoned with the colors of the Sikh Motorcycle Club, hair dutifully unshorn.
The members of the Sikh Motorcycle Club love to ride, to practice what KJ Singh, another founding member, calls “Wind therapy.” One bright morning in early June, three members met in front of a gurudwara in Nazareth, Pennsylvania.
Originally, the Sikh Motorcycle Club had gone by a different name: Khalsa.
In its practices and through its demands, requires submission – and the members of the Sikh Motorcycle Club are very conscious of being law-abiding citizens: husbands, fathers, and men of god.
Barninder had joined a local motorcycle meetup group prior to helping found the Sikh Motorcycle Club.
In the Sikh Motorcycle Club, he said, “You have a level of comfort with this group you don’t have with any other.” Amrita and Shelly, Daman’s wife, get along so well they joke about being a couple.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Many Strategies Fail Because They’re Not Actually Strategies”

Many strategy execution processes fail because the firm does not have something worth executing.
The strategy consultants come in, do their work, and document the new strategy in a PowerPoint presentation and a weighty report.
One major reason for the lack of action is that “New strategies” are often not strategies at all.
A real strategy involves a clear set of choices that define what the firm is going to do and what it’s not going to do.
Many strategies fail to get implemented, despite the ample efforts of hard-working people, because they do not represent a set of clear choices.
Others may represent a couple of the firm’s priorities and choices, but they do not form a coherent strategy when considered in conjunction.
Another reason many implementation efforts fail is that executives see it as a pure top-down, two-step process: “The strategy is made; now we implement it.” That’s unlikely to work.
Depending on your specific circumstances and strategy, this might involve taking on difficult clients or projects that fit your new strategy and that trigger learning throughout the firm.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Deep Intellect”

How can an octopus know anything, much less form an opinion? Octopuses are, after all, “Only” invertebrates – they don’t even belong with the insects, some of whom, like dragonflies and dung beetles, at least seem to show some smarts.
One volunteer who interacted with an octopus left the aquarium with arms covered in red hickeys.
How does an octopus decide what animal to mimic, what colors to turn? Scientists have no idea, especially given that octopuses are likely colorblind.
Breathing through a snorkel, she was watching Octopus vulgaris – the common octopus.
The octopus “Must have had some concept,” she said, “Of what it wanted to make itself feel safe enough to go to sleep.” And the octopus knew how to get what it wanted: by employing foresight, planning – and perhaps even tool use.
Mather is the lead author of Octopus: The Ocean’s Intelligent Invertebrate, which includes observations of octopuses who dismantle Lego sets and open screw-top jars.
“Octopuses,” writes philosopher Godfrey-Smith, “Are a separate experiment in the evolution of the mind.” And that, he feels, is what makes the study of the octopus mind so philosophically interesting.
Athena, to my sorrow, may live only a few more months – the natural lifespan of a giant Pacific octopus is only three years.

The orginal article.