Summary of “Why Are We So Unwilling to Take Sylvia Plath at Her Word?”

Back in April, the Guardian dropped an apparent literary bombshell-new letters had been discovered from the poet Sylvia Plath, alleging horrific physical abuse at the hands of her husband, the British poet Ted Hughes.
Even, from time to time, by Hughes himself, who casually claims to have burned Plath’s journals from the last two years of her life, in his forward to the 1982 Journals of Sylvia Plath.
In the hunt for a deeper understanding of Sylvia Plath, things are always going missing.
The only way we can discount the certainty of that abuse is if we choose to disbelieve Plath at her repeated word in her journals, reports to friends and family, and now, it seems, letters to Dr. Ruth Barnhouse, Plath’s therapist-turned-confidante.
Paul Alexander’s Rough Magic contains a dramatic account of Hughes attempting to strangle Plath on their honeymoon in Benidorm, Spain-a grim tale supposedly told to the author by Aurelia Schober Plath, Sylvia’s mother, who allowed herself to be interviewed for the book.
Plath, the Real Plath, always elusive, was in here, I felt.
Barely a year later, as the newly married couple was teaching in Massachusetts, Plath caught Hughes with another woman, a co-ed; this erupted in a spectacular fight, which left Plath with a sprained thumb and Hughes with “Bloody claw marks.” Again and again, some similar fight; again and again, she forgave him, sometimes turning the blame on herself.
Ted Hughes gaslit Plath for the seven years that they were married, and when she died? The bulk of the American and British literary establishment picked up where he left off.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Globalisation: the rise and fall of an idea that swept the world”

In a panel titled Governing Globalisation, the economist Dambisa Moyo, otherwise a well-known supporter of free trade, forthrightly asked the audience to accept that “There have been significant losses” from globalisation.
“Rejecting globalisation,” the American journalist George Packer has written, “Was like rejecting the sunrise.” Globalisation could take place in services, capital and ideas, making it a notoriously imprecise term; but what it meant most often was making it cheaper to trade across borders – something that seemed to many at the time to be an unquestionable good.
Called “Anti-globalisation” by the media, and the “Alter-globalisation” or “Global justice” movement by its participants, it tried to draw attention to the devastating effect that free trade policies were having, especially in the developing world, where globalisation was supposed to be having its most beneficial effect.
That month, Martin Wolf argued in a column that globalisation had “Lost dynamism”, due to a slackening of the world economy, the “Exhaustion” of new markets to exploit and a rise in protectionist policies around the world.
Possessed of a panoply of elite titles – former chief economist of the World Bank, former Treasury secretary, president emeritus of Harvard, former economic adviser to President Barack Obama – Summers was renowned in the 1990s and 2000s for being a blustery proponent of globalisation.
From 1948 to 1990, world trade grew at an annual average of nearly 7% – faster than the post-communist years, which we think of as the high point of globalisation.
In his 2011 book The Globalization Paradox, Rodrik concluded that “We cannot simultaneously pursue democracy, national determination, and economic globalisation.” The results of the 2016 elections and referendums provide ample testimony of the justness of the thesis, with millions voting to push back, for better or for worse, against the campaigns and institutions that promised more globalisation.
One reason, says Wolf, was that “a very, very large proportion of the gains from globalisation – by no means all – have been exploited. We have a more open world economy to trade than we’ve ever had before.” Citing The Great Convergence, Wolf noted that supply chains have already expanded, and that future developments, such as automation and the use of robots, looked to undermine the promise of a growing industrial workforce.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Exciting Life and Lonely Death of a Basketball Vagabond”

The Toronto encounter would also lead me to to Jackson’s father, Brett, a former center at U.C.L.A. and the one person whose life, in some ways, was just like his son’s.
After 13 years of marriage, he and Lesle Davis split up when Jackson was in the first grade.
For Jackson, the estrangement from his mother lasted over a decade and ended only when he visited her and his half brother, Robin Anselme, at his mother’s Florida home a few years ago.
Jackson clashed with his father at times, and basketball could be the most contentious subject of all.
Still, with the help of his stepmother Jackson managed to get admitted to Snow College in Ephraim, Utah, where he played for a coach named Curtis Condie.
After two years there, Condie recommended him to Iowa State’s coach, Larry Eustachy, thinking Eustachy would appreciate Jackson.
Tough, emotionally vulnerable, loyal and rebellious all at once, Jackson Vroman reminded Eustachy of himself.
In February 2006, Brett was watching on TV in Salt Lake City when Jackson took a pass from Chris Paul in a game against Brett’s old team, the Jazz.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Will Electric Cars Go Mainstream? It May Be Sooner Than You Think”

Exxon Mobil, which is studying the threat that electric cars could pose to its business model, still expects that plug-in vehicle sales will grow slowly, to just 10 percent of new sales in the United States by 2040, with little impact on global oil use.
Governments could scale back their incentives before plug-in vehicles become fully competitive – many states are already beginning to tax electric cars.
Potential SetbacksOther experts caution that falling battery costs are not the only factor in determining whether electric cars become widespread. Sam Ori, the executive director of the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago, noted, “People don’t buy cars based solely on the price tag.”
As a result, the Bloomberg report warns that plug-in vehicles may have a difficult time making inroads in dense urban areas and that infrastructure bottlenecks may slow the growth of electric vehicles after 2040.Another potential hurdle may be the automakers themselves.
“We’ve seen a lot of announcements about electric vehicles, but that doesn’t matter much if automakers are just building these cars for compliance and are unenthusiastic about actually marketing them,” Ms. Sexton said.
Mass adoption of electric cars could also prove a key strategy in fighting climate change – provided the vehicles are increasingly powered by low-carbon electricity rather than coal.
The International Energy Agency has estimated that electric vehicles would have to account for at least 40 percent of passenger vehicle sales by 2040 for the world to have a chance of meeting the climate goals outlined in the Paris agreement, keeping total global warming below 2 degrees Celsius.
Even with a sharp rise in electric vehicles, the world would still have more traditional petroleum-powered passenger vehicles on the road in 2040 than it does today, and it will take many years to retire existing fleets.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Real Men Might Get Made Fun Of”

If you care, how often do you say something? Maybe you’ll confront your close friends, but what about more powerful men, famous men, cool men, men who could further your career?
One of the subtlest and most pervasive is social ostracism – coding empathy as the fun killer, consideration for others as an embarrassing weakness and dissenting voices as out-of-touch, bleeding-heart dweebs.
Women, already impeded and imperiled by sexism, also have to carry the social stigma of being feminist buzzkills if they call attention to it.
In contrast to these “Warriors,” promises a world in which you can have it both ways: You can be good without ever seeming uncool in front of your buddies, you can be an advocate for social justice without ever considering there might be social forces beyond your ken, you can be a crusader for positive change without ever killing anyone’s buzz, you can be a progressive hero without ever taking identity politics seriously.
It’s an ambitious contortion, and one that affords straight white men a luxurious degree of stasis.
What if fixing Pao’s toxic workplaces hadn’t fallen to her alone? I’m frequently contacted by young women weighing the benefits and costs of calling out sexism in their male-dominated industries.
One of my podcasting friends told me that he does stick up for women in challenging situations, like testosterone-soaked comedy green rooms but complained, “I get mocked for it!”.
I know there’s pressure not to be a dorky, try-hard male feminist stereotype; there’s always a looming implication that you could lose your spot in the club; if you seem opportunistic or performative in your support, if you suck up too much oxygen and demand praise, women will yell at you for that too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Little Shifts that Will Make Your “Stressful” Life 5 Times Easier”

All the results in your life come from the little things.
You become successful over time from all the little things you do every day.
All the little things – if not corrected – become big things, over time.
Are the little things you’re doing every day working for you or against you?
These strategies gradually strengthen common weak points we’ve seen plaguing thousands of our course students, coaching clients, and live event attendees over the past decade – little things people do every day that stress them out and stop them from moving forward with their lives.
In his book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Stephen Covey explains that some things in life are important, and some things are just urgent.
Too often we spend our time and energy thinking about the desired end results of a big goal, instead of actually doing the little things that need to be done today.
You will have a hard time ever being happy if you aren’t thankful for the good things in your life right now.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The real reason New York City can’t make the trains run on time”

The subway opened in 1904, offering much higher speed: 15 mph on the local trains, 24 mph on the express trains.
Subways and regional trains around the world accelerate at 2.5 mph per second or even faster, but in New York acceleration is restricted to about 1 mph per second.
At the same time, Paris fully automated Metro Line 1, of about the same length as New York’s 7 train, for €100 million, or about $125 million, and is doing the same for Metro Line 4, about 7.5 miles long, for €150 million.
Unlike nearly every other subway system in the world, New York runs trains 24/7. Most systems perform maintenance at night, when the trains aren’t running.
Since New York’s trains are always running, they do maintenance during the day, shutting down one track at a time and imposing special slow orders on trains running adjacent to work zones.
The MTA has two metrics for punctuality: on-time performance at the end of each train run and wait assessment, measuring the gap between two successive trains.
Since subway riders do not look at schedules, even headways between trains matter more than the schedule, leading to a growing emphasis on WA. This measures adherence to the schedule, relative to the headway, even when the schedule does not have even headways, but the dispatchers still sometimes hold trains to smooth out delays.
Zak Accuardi, a senior analyst at the national think tank TransitCenter, proposed doing away with WA entirely and replacing it with a metric combining excess wait time and excess train travel time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Utilities fighting against rooftop solar are only hastening their own doom”

Across the country, intense battles are being waged as utilities push back against the rapid spread of rooftop solar.
To understand the role of batteries, first you have to understand why utilities don’t like rooftop solar in the first place – and what they’re doing to stop it.
Utilities’ problem with rooftop solar power, in 250 words or less Utilities don’t make money selling electricity – for that, they can only recover costs.
Two, the more solar customers reduce their utility bills by generating their own power, the more utilities have to charge other, non-solar customers more, to cover their costs-plus-returns.
Cheap batteries neuter utility attacks on rooftop solar “In a low-cost storage environment,” McKinsey writes, the rate structures utilities are monkeying around with “Are unlikely to be effective at mitigating load losses.” In other words, customers are still going to keep generating more of their own power.
If utilities alter rate structures to reflect time of day and location, batteries allow solar customers to arbitrage, storing power when it is cheap, selling it back to the grid when it’s worth more.
If utilities reduce the amount they pay for rooftop solar-generated power, batteries allow customers to increase their “Self-consumption” – that is, to consume more of the solar power they generate, by storing it and spreading it out across the day.
Utilities cannot avoid radical reform What should utilities do about it? McKinsey’s treatment of that question is fairly cursory.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is The Universe Conscious?”

The history of science – in particular the physical sciences, like physics and astronomy – can be told as the incremental realization that there is large-scale coherence in the universe.
By large-scale coherence, I mean that some of the same physical laws hold at scales as diverse as the atom and the galaxy, and even the universe as a whole.
In a sense, the universe speaks one language and scientists act as the interpreters, translating this language in terms that humans can understand and relate to.
Panpsychism is an ancient belief that has been an essential aspect of many religions, from the Old Testament’s omniscience and omnipresence God to the Brahman of Hinduism, “The single binding unity behind the diversity in all that exists in the universe” In a nutshell, panpsychism states that mind is everywhere.
The possibility of a conscious universe seems to fly in the face of our deep-seated materialist worldview, whereby everything that exists is due to material particles and their mutual interactions, the very successful reductionist view of physics.
There’s nothing special about the Milky Way, given that the same laws of physics apply everywhere within the known universe.
To me, what’s fascinating is that consciousness is what makes the universe exist.
We will never know all things about the universe, but we have the amazing capacity to always learn more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “As a Guru, Ayn Rand May Have Limits. Ask Travis Kalanick.”

Rew F. Puzder, Mr. Trump’s first nominee for secretary of labor, is described by friends as an avid Ayn Rand reader.
The Whole Foods founder and chief executive John Mackey, an ardent libertarian and admirer of Rand, last month had to cede control of the troubled upscale grocery company to Amazon and Jeff Bezos.
“Rand’s entrepreneur is the Promethean hero of capitalism,” said Lawrence E. Cahoone, professor of philosophy at the College of the Holy Cross, whose lecture on Rand is part of his Great Courses series, “The Modern Political Tradition.” “But she never really explores how a dynamic entrepreneur actually runs a business.”
Rand’s defenders insist that the problems for Mr. Kalanick and others influenced by Rand aren’t that they embraced her philosophy, but rather that they didn’t go far enough.
Yaron Brook, executive chairman of the Ayn Rand Institute and a former finance professor at Santa Clara University, who teaches seminars on business leadership and ethics from an Objectivist perspective, said, “Few business people have actually read her essays and philosophy and studied her in depth.” Mr. Brook said that while Mr. Kalanick “Was obviously talented and energetic and a visionary, he took superficial inspiration from her ideas and used her philosophy to justify his obnoxiousness.”
Rand “Had enormous respect for people who worked hard and did a good job, whether a secretary or a railroad worker,” he said.
Mr. Allison handed out copies of “Atlas Shrugged” to senior executives and is a major donor to the Ayn Rand Institute.
“Mention Ayn Rand to a group of academic philosophers and you’ll get laughed out of the room,” Mr. Cahoone said.

The orginal article.