Summary of “100 Percent Is Overrated”

The idea of a fixed mindset, in which people are smart or not smart, stands in contrast to a growth mindset, in which people become intelligent and knowledgeable through practice.
In her 2006 book The New Psychology of Success, psychologist Carol Dweck described the two: People with growth mindsets believe that the harder they work, the smarter they get.
The group most damaged by fixed-mindset thinking is high-achieving girls, Boaler argues, because it’s girls who are told by society that they probably won’t be as good as boys at math and science.
Speaking of percentages, math is a good example of the importance of avoiding the fixed mindset.
The idea of a “Math person” or a math gene is a primary reason for so much math nihilism, math failure, and “Math trauma,” as Boaler called it on Monday.
When kids get the idea that they “Aren’t math people,” they start a downward trajectory, and their career options shrink immediately and substantially.
There is also the common idea of a wall in math: People learn math until they hit a wall where they just can’t keep up.
In no other discipline but math are people so given to thinking, instead of I need to practice, just Well, I’m not good.

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Summary of “What it’s like to go to school when dozens have been killed nearby”

Jaleyah, then a high school sophomore, barely had time to grieve when a month later, her best friend, Alex Lomeli, 18, was shot and killed when someone tried to rob a market about a mile from the same high school, located at 60th and Hoover streets.
In the early hours of Mother’s Day 2018, two other teens Jaleyah was close to, Monyae Jackson and La’marrion Upchurch, were walking home with friends, when they were fatally shot near Dymally High School.
Each of Jaleyah’s friends was killed within walking distance of public high schools in Los Angeles.
Sixteen-year-old Carl Hull, a sophomore at Dymally High School, starts his walk to school each morning by turning into an alley to avoid gang members who live on his street.
Over the last five years, 105 people have been killed within a mile of the campus, the highest number surrounding any public high school in the county.
Similar scenes played out at several area schools where students had known the boys who were killed.
As Dymally was preparing for graduation just weeks after former student Monyae’s death, there was more tragic news: Campus aide James Lamont Taylor was killed at 8:30 a.m., walking on the street about a mile from the school.
A member of Dymally’s school site council, Hull said she wants to see staff pay more attention to the climate on campus and try to understand the root of students’ problems rather than suspending or arresting them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Access To Parks In Childhood Associated With Better Adult Mental Health”

Access To Parks In Childhood Associated With Better Adult Mental Health : Shots – Health News Research suggests the more of your childhood that is spent surrounded by green spaces, the lower your risk of developing mental illness in adulthood, whether in the city or the country.
Researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark found that growing up near vegetation is associated with an up to 55 percent lower risk of mental health disorders in adulthood.
Kristine Engemann, the biologist who led the study, combined decades of satellite imagery with extensive health and demographic data of the Danish population to investigate the mental health effects of growing up near greenery.
More practical factors, like socioeconomic status, family history of mental illness, and urbanization can also have large effects on mental health.
Armed with these data, the researchers compared the risk of developing 16 different mental health disorders in adulthood to how much green space surrounded each child’s residence.
“Green space seemed to have an association that was similar in strength to other known influences on mental health, like history of mental health disorders in the family, or socioeconomic status,” says Engemann.
What’s more, the effect of green space was “Dosage-dependent” – the more of your childhood you spent close to greenery, the lower your risk of mental health problems in adulthood.
The greenery association with better mental health held across both rural and urban areas of Denmark.

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Summary of “New Yorker Reporter Jane Mayer on Kavanaugh, the Koch Brothers, and Trump”

On the page, Mayer, a staff writer at the New Yorker since 1995, is authoritative and direct, and as a journalist, she is relentless.
Mayer grew up in New York City but lives in DC, where she shares a three-story house with a husky yellow Lab, Rosie, and her husband, Bill Hamilton, the Washington editor for the New York Times.
Mayer often writes in an office on the second floor overlooking a dog park, but she also has a workspace at the New Yorker’s modest DC base.
“It’s the kind of infallible crystal ball that only comes from years of putting in the work.” Over the course of her career, Mayer has written four best-selling books, and one quality they share, according to Michiko Kakutani, former chief book critic of the New York Times and a longtime friend, is that they “Demonstrate uncanny historical prescience.”
Due to some weird alchemy between Twitter, where Mayer has 167,000 followers, and the rise of Trump, her work’s prominence has risen dramatically, with her New Yorker features-about Trump’s The Art of the Deal ghostwriter, about the ex-spy behind the Trump dossier-slamming into the media landscape, one after the next.
The new couple refused to return Mayer’s dog, so one day, when they weren’t home, she and Abramson drove over, and Mayer climbed through the pet door to retrieve it.
In the lead-up to the Kavanaugh hearings Mayer worked numerous 20-hour days, which was extreme even for a woman whose workload often leaves little time for everyday tasks-her car’s license plates were once so long expired that, on her way to a C-Span interview, she was pulled over, handcuffed, and brought to a police station.
“Before long we were hearing Sheryl Sandberg knew about it. It was so far from the conspiracy view that someone leaked her name.” Just after they published their story about Ford on September 14, they learned about Ramirez, and Farrow began spending hours talking to her, while Mayer focused on “The accountability portion, trying to be fair.” The decision to publish was fraught, but informed by the other incident Mayer learned about, the one she didn’t get into print, which also involved sexual misbehavior at a drunken party.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Individualism is not a sufficient foundation for social life”

An essential recurring theme is the unsustainability of radical individualism: humans are fundamentally political animals, and the metaphor of the body politic is an ideal conceptual tool for realising that our health depends on the flourishing of a broader whole.
Just as a hand is no longer really a hand if the body to which it was previously joined has been destroyed, so too does the individual depend on the body politic: ‘For although it is worthy to attain for only an individual, it is nobler and more divine to do so for a nation or city-state.
The body politic metaphor raises these essential questions, and it also suggests answers: ‘incorporating’ others into our figurative bodies and strengthening connections within the body so that their pain is felt as our own.
Though Locke is still writing within the body politic metaphor, he is pushing at its limits: the hierarchy implied by the biological structure of the body is dissolving into a more horizontal model defined by consent of the governed, and the universal application of law.
Radical individualism today retains this highly circumscribed conception of government’s role; the body politic – above all – serves to protect the safety and the property of the individual.
In The Social Contract, Rousseau argues that a healthy body politic founded on inequality is impossible: ‘as soon as there is a master, there is no more sovereign, and the body politic is destroyed forthwith.
Are immigrants pathogens, breaking across the skin barrier of our borders? Or are they essential infusions of new life into the political bodies of Europe and the US? The language used by news corporations for protest movements and epidemic diseases is strikingly parallel.
Meditation on the meaning of the body politic from Thucydides to today reminds us that the individual is fundamentally a component of a collective political organism.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Jail Health-Care Crisis”

The crisis is particularly acute in jails, because large numbers of people booked into custody are in a state of distress or, like Laintz, will suffer withdrawal, which can require close monitoring and specialized treatment that jail wardens are not equipped to provide.
“People really are trying to provide high-quality health care, and jail environments are really tough,” Brent Gibson, a physician who is the chief health officer of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care, said.
The health services at the jail were provided by Correctional Healthcare, the company that was later acquired by Wellpath.
Opioid addiction, too, is an area in which jail health care is increasingly relied on by default.
Nancy Fishman, a criminal-justice policy expert at the Vera Institute, told me that “Every sort of convocation of sheriffs or jail administrators or law enforcement” these days is consumed by the opioid crisis and its impact on jail health care.
The concurrent rise of for-profit health care in jails and prisons has not been accompanied by the kind of public debate, congressional scrutiny, or scholarly research that has informed other fields of health policy.
In some European Union countries, where universal access to health care is fully established, prison and jail health care is often administered by state health services.
Last July, after a woman gave birth in her cell at the York Correctional Institution, in Niantic, Connecticut, where health care was overseen by the University of Connecticut, and where there had been other complaints about care, officials transferred responsibility for prisoner health care statewide back to the state corrections agency.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Brexit: what happens the next day if there is no deal?”

Currently, a driver of a UK-registered car is allowed to drive anywhere in the EU, the EEA, Switzerland and Serbia, and not have to carry a green card that proves you have insurance cover.
If the UK leaves without a deal, all changes and drivers will be expected to carry a green card when in mainland Europe and Ireland.
The official advice from the UK government is: “From 29 March 2019, in the event that there is no EU exit deal drivers of UK-registered vehicles will need to carry a motor insurance green card when driving in the EU and EEA.”.
Direct Line insurance says: “In the event of a no-deal Brexit, we have plans to ensure customers are provided with a green card if they drive in Europe on or after 29 March. Customers will need to contact us at least two weeks in advance of when they are due to travel.”
From 29 March, if the UK leaves without a deal, the government says: “You may need a GB sticker even if your vehicle has a europlate. You will not need a GB sticker to drive outside the UK if you replace a europlate with a numberplate that features the GB sign without the EU flag.” PC. Driving with a UK licence when abroad. In a sentence You will have to buy an International Driving Permit to drive in Europe, at a price of £5.50, with different ones required for France and Spain.
If there is no deal with the EU then recognition of UK driving licences in the EU ends.
So British drivers will have to go to the Post Office and obtain an International Driving Permit, which you will need to carry with you in conjunction with your UK driving licence.
It was also revealed this week that British citizens resident in Ireland – estimated to number about 300,000 – will be required to swap their UK driving licence for an Irish one at a fee of €55 if there is no deal on Brexit.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

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Summary of “These startups sell plants to stressed-out millennials”

In the last few years, demand for indoor plants among city dwellers has soared, according to some retailers-especially among millennials.
“I believe plants and nature are the antidote to the stress we feel from being so connected to screens,” says Rebecca Bullene, the founder of Greenery NYC, which creates plant installations for companies, sells plants to New Yorkers online, and just opened a retail store in Brooklyn.
“We position plants and our brand as the break in all this. It’s the antidote to this unfortunate thing that our entire generation suffers from: anxiety. And plants really can be part of the cure.”
Startups like The Sill sell a lot of the same kinds of plants that nurseries do.
In The Sill’s “Easy for beginners” tab, a small pothos plant in a pot will cost you $44, while an unpotted snake plant costs $16. Other startups sell the same type of potted pothos plant for around $35. Plants are a commodity in theory, they should be around the same price.
“It’s not a sales pitch. It’s more of a celebration of plants or the feeling and idea of what plants provide people,” Blank says.
The bright space had plants hanging from the walls, plants all over the floor, and even plants growing out of the furniture.
That’s in part why many of these startups don’t focus on using fancy grow systems that plug into the wall and aim to keep plants alive with no effort on your part.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emma Thompson’s letter to Skydance: Why I can’t work for John Lasseter”

When Skydance Media Chief Executive David Ellison announced this year that he was hiring John Lasseter to head Skydance Animation, many in and outside the company were shocked and deeply unhappy.
Only months earlier, Lasseter had ended his relationship with Pixar – where he had worked since the early ’80s – and parent company Disney after multiple allegations of inappropriate behavior and the creation of a frat house-like work environment.
After announcing the hire, Ellison sent a long email to staff, noting that Lasseter was contractually obligated to behave professionally, and convened a series of town halls in which Lasseter apologized for past behavior and asked to be given the chance to prove himself to his new staff.
Mireille Soria, president of Paramount Animation, with which Skydance has a distribution deal, took the highly unusual step of meeting with female employees to tell them that they could decline to work with Lasseter.
Much has been said about giving John Lasseter a “Second chance.” But he is presumably being paid millions of dollars to receive that second chance.
If John Lasseter started his own company, then every employee would have been given the opportunity to choose whether or not to give him a second chance.
Skydance has revealed that no women received settlements from Pixar or Disney as a result of being harassed by John Lasseter.
Given all the abuse that’s been heaped on women who have come forward to make accusations against powerful men, do we really think that no settlements means that there was no harassment or no hostile work environment? Are we supposed to feel comforted that women who feel that their careers were derailed by working for Lasseter DIDN’T receive money?

The orginal article.