Summary of “When do you know you’re old enough to die? Barbara Ehrenreich has some answers”

Four years ago, Barbara Ehrenreich, 76, reached the realisation that she was old enough to die.
Part polemic, part autobiographical, Ehrenreich – who holds a PhD in cellular immunology – casts a skeptical, sometimes witty, and scientifically rigorous eye over the beliefs we hold that we think will give us longevity.
When Ehrenreich talks of being old enough to die, she does not mean that each of us has an expiration date.
In Natural Causes, Ehrenreich writes about how you receive more calls to screenings and tests in the US – including mammograms, colonoscopies and bone density scans – as you get older.
Ehrenreich, who is divorced, has talked to her children – Rosa, a law professor, and Ben, a journalist and novelist – about her realisation she is old enough to die, but “Not in a grim way”.
A recent exchange with a friend summed up what Ehrenreich hoped to achieve with Natural Causes.
In Natural Causes, Ehrenreich uses the latest biomedical research to challenge our assumption that we have agency over our bodies and minds.
Ehrenreich, an atheist, finds comfort in the idea that humans do not live alone in a lifeless universe where the natural world is devoid of agency.

The orginal article.

Summary of “to the family’s happiness”

In most of the studies – which involved more than 3,000 families – the parents were assessed as well as their kids, and reading aloud appeared to strengthen parents’ feelings of competence, improve the quality of their relationships with their children and even reduce parental stress or depression.
In Australia, more than a third of children aged 6 to 11 whose parents had stopped reading to them wanted to continue.
“If you are going to get anywhere in life,” Roald Dahl is credited with saying, “You have to read a lot of books.”
Because reading aloud is pleasurable, parents and teachers reinforce a child’s habit of reading because they create a positive association with it.
Turning book reading into a ritual is as simple as repetition paired with a certain time or situation.
We want to read to them as much as they want to be read to.
If you’ve stopped reading to your kids and it feels like that era is over, don’t close the book on it forever.
Maybe wait until they’re sick and read them the book they’re reading to themselves for pleasure or school.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Case of Hong Kong’s Missing Booksellers”

Partway through the questioning, the older officer got up for a break, leaving Lam alone with Li. The two men sat in awkward silence until Lam, reaching for the conviviality of their last encounter, offered a joke.
Lam, he said, was trying to disrupt the Chinese system, and as part of a special investigative unit, it was his job to dismantle Hong Kong’s illicit publishing scene once and for all.
Lying awake, Lam wondered whether anyone in Hong Kong realized he was missing.
Sitting across from Lam, his interrogators produced a stack of banned books, all published by Mighty Current and shipped to China by Lam.
On a June morning, Lam arrived in Hong Kong and reported to a nearby police station, as directed.
Lam sat up all night, the glow of his phone illuminating each new twist in a case that he had lived through but never understood until now.
A few hours later, Lam was standing behind a lectern amid hundreds of reporters, photographers and news cameras at the Hong Kong Legislative Council.
At the time of Lam’s abduction, banned books were everywhere in Hong Kong, sold throughout the city at big-box retailers, specialized cafes and corner convenience stores.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Fresh voices: 50 writers you should read now”

Mark O’ConnellO’Connell’s captivating book about transhumanism and “Solving the problem of death”, To Be a Machine, which saw him navigate some of the stranger byways of Silicon Valley, was shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford prize, the Royal Society science book prize and recently the Wellcome prize.
Reni Eddo-LodgeEddo-Lodge’s debut book Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race, published last year, has recently won the Jhalak prize – it was praised by the judges as a “Clarion call for action”, which “Not only holds up a mirror to contemporary Britain but also serves as a warning”.
His ambitious debut book New Dark Age comes out in July.
His ambitious debut book, New Dark Age, which argues that the digital era is radically shifting the boundaries of human experience, is out in July.
Nick DrnasoThe Illinois native picked up an LA Times book prize for his excellent 2016 debut, Beverly, a series of sad and lyrical interconnected stories.
Her second book, Force of Nature, which features the same investigator and concerns an elemental battle for survival in the unforgiving Australian wilderness, lives up to the promise of her stunning debut.
His first book for children, My Brother Is a Superhero, is subtitled “I could have been one too, except I needed a wee”; the story of comic geek Luke and his older brother Zack, unfairly given superpowers by a visiting alien, it won the Waterstones prize for children’s fiction in 2016, and its two sequels have since been flying off the shelves.
Her most recent book, Testosterone Rex, won the Royal Society science book of the year prize in 2017.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Exactly Does a Librarian Do? Everything.”

Every job in a library depends on someone else’s to function.
Libraries are buzzing hives filled with extremely busy, frazzled, overworked people.
Staff and Librarians work together to make sure that everything runs as smoothly as possible, which it NEVER, EVER DOES. Lots of different types of library work happens everywhere-new jobs crop up daily, thanks to evolving tech and shifting community needs-but there are some standard positions that remain eternal.
First of all, there’s the backbone of the library: technical services.
These are library employees who go home and drink a lot.
What I’m saying about library “Tropes” is that they apply to anyone who works in a library because you have to know how to do everyone else’s job.
Librarianship is the understanding that maintaining a library is a shared responsibility.
Libraries are community spaces for patrons as well as for library staff.

The orginal article.

Summary of “6 Must-Read Books That Will Unlock Your Inner Mental Strength”

What are the best books to read for mental strength? originally appeared on Quora – the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world.
There are no quick fixes or easy hacks for mental strength.
Over the years, I’ve picked up a number of great books about the mental game, the mind-body connection, and the secrets of learning new skills.
I’ve grouped the first three books together because they all reflect on the same aspects of the mental game-the connection between your conscious mind, your subconscious, and your performance.
One of the most interesting points Ericsson makes is about mental representations.
As people increase their skill levels, they begin to see things differently, breaking representations of physical objects into different “Chunks.” They recognize patterns and develop much more sophisticated mental representations.
If you’re interested in the mental game for personal or professional reasons, each of these books is useful in it’s own way.
Your mental effort is meant to change your behaviors, which in turn, helps you reach your goals and build your mental strength.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Slightly Embarrassing Love for Jack Kerouac”

Every year on or around March 12th, acolytes of the Beat writer Jack Kerouac cluster at the Flamingo Sports Bar in St. Petersburg, Florida, to celebrate his birthday.
Two local acolytes, Pat Barmore and Pete Gallagher, have been organizing Jack Kerouac Night at the Flamingo for five years.
“The ghost of Jack Kerouac is definitely here,” Barmore announced at the start of the evening.
Kerouac had just turned twenty-nine when he started writing the book in earnest.
Most covers of “On the Road” feature a grainy, black-and-white photograph of a young Kerouac looking rakish and cavalier.
“Jack Kerouac, author, artist, cult hero, was watching Walter Cronkite on the evening news, volume turned silent, while Handel’s Messiah blared from the record player. He was smoking Camels, drinking whiskey from a medicine vial and chasing it with Falstaff beer in a half-quart can,” the paper later reported.
There have been thoughtful efforts by Friends of the Jack Kerouac House, the nonprofit run by Barmore and Gallagher, to turn the house into a museum.
Kerouac is buried in Lowell-when I visited his grave a couple years back, it was covered with wine bottles and pens-but he spent his last moments in St. Petersburg.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Reading Books Should be Your Priority, According to Science”

More than a quarter-26 percent-of American adults admit to not having read even part of a book within the last year.
If you’re part of this group, know that science supports the idea that reading is good for you on several levels.
Reading fiction can help you be more open-minded and creative.
According to research conducted at the University of Toronto, study participants who read short story fiction experienced far less need for “Cognitive closure” compared with counterparts who read non-fiction essays.
“Although nonfiction reading allows students to learn the subject matter, it may not always help them in thinking about it,” the authors write.
That’s according to Yale researchers who studied 3,635 people older than 50 and found that those who read books for 30 minutes daily lived an average of 23 months longer than non-readers or magazine readers.
Apparently, the practice of reading books creates cognitive engagement which improves lots of things, including vocabulary, thinking skills and concentration.
Reading 50 books a year is something you can actually accomplish.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Retain More of Every Book You Read”

For most people, the ultimate goal of reading a nonfiction book is to actually improve your life by learning a new skill, understanding an important problem, or looking at the world in a new way.
It’s important to read books, but it is just as important to remember what you read and put it to good use.
Having searchable book notes is essential for returning to ideas easily.
Typing notes while reading a print book can be annoying because you are always putting the book down and picking it back up.
I like to place the book on a book stand, which makes it much easier to type out a long quote or keep my hands free while reading.
As I read Mastery by George Leonard, I realized that while this book was about the process of improvement, it also shed some light on the connection between genetics and performance.
How would I describe the book to a friend? What are the main ideas? If I was going to implement one idea from the book right now, which one would it be?
In many cases, I find that I can usually get just as much useful information from reading my one-paragraph summary and reviewing my notes as I would if I read the entire book again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Black Kids Don’t Want to Read About Harriet Tubman All the Time”

The typical children’s picture books featuring black characters focus on the degradation and endurance of our people.
Regardless of what the publishing industry seems to think, our babies don’t spend their days thinking about Harriet Tubman, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and black bodies swinging; they’re excited about what the tooth fairy will leave under their pillows, contemplating their first ride on the school bus, looking for dragons in their closets.
White children, too, deserve – and need – to see black characters that revel in the same human experiences that they do.
They didn’t get how black Baptist church communities devote themselves to nurturing children in ways beyond the Bible.
We published “Early Sunday Morning” last year, and many of the black parents and children who are buying it now have told me they are grateful for the story.
Color is of no consequence to the stories, but it still matters to black children looking for themselves in the pages.
The success of these books proves that parents, teachers, librarians and children are craving stories that celebrate the humanity and everyday experiences of black children and families.
If the same editors at the same publishing houses are pushing the same tales about Harriet Tubman, Dr. King, Muhammad Ali, and how black people “Overcame,” often written and illustrated by white writers and artists, well, they will have missed the opportunity to really nourish our children.

The orginal article.