Summary of “Four Secrets of People Who Finish Their Workweeks on Thursday”

If you think you have far too many commitments and not enough time to actually work, you’ll need to see what you can move around or back out of.2.
As Stephen R. Covey, the successful businessman and author, said, “Most of us spend too much time on what is urgent, and not enough time on what is important.”
People who get everything wrapped up before Friday know the value of effective prioritization, and many of them use the time management matrix developed by Covey in order to take a step back and readjust their focus on the things that are critical, rather than time pressing.
There’s often a big difference between how you’re actually spending your time and how you should be spending your time.
You can even take a cue from Tommy John’s CEO, Tom Patterson, and set an out-of-office message that lets everybody know you’re only reading your emails at a certain time.
Successful people are always concerned with producing top-notch results-however, they also find little ways to save time in the process.
Are there places where you’re spending a lot of unnecessary time?
If you managed to save yourself 15 minutes each day between Monday and Thursday, that’d be an entire hour by the time Friday rolls around.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happens When You Drink a Gallon of Water a Day?”

In an effort to overcompensate my way to better life habits, I decided to slosh through a feat known across the internet as the Water Gallon Challenge: drinking a gallon per day for a month, with the promise of glowing skin and a lot more energy.
Day 5: Yes! Water is life! I no longer hobble into my day with my feet and spine curled up like dry leaves.
Day 7: Can we talk about how good I am at yoga right now? My hamstrings are much more flexible, and my back bends with ease.
Day 10: A switch to water that’s been ultrapurified by reverse osmosis has proved revelatory.
Day 14: I crave water first thing in the morning instead of coffee.
Day 19: The peeing has decreased to ten times per day.
Day 32: Oops, the month is over and I didn’t even notice-hydration is routine, and I’m loving it.
How much: “Proper hydration means 85 ounces of water a day from food and beverages, plus more to replenish what you lose when exercising.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Morning Habits That Can Affect Your Entire Day”

Your morning routine is like setting up a string of dominoes: You line everything up for success, but one false move can cause it all to come tumbling down.
In order to set the right tone for the rest of your day, experts say you should adjust the following seven habits.
“Physically, hitting the snooze button actually sets you up to be groggy and less productive because you are repeatedly waking yourself out of a deep sleep,” Kleinman says.
Doing this first thing in the morning stimulates self-criticism and judgments in your mind, Kleinman says.
Begin your day instead with a self-affirming habit like journaling or meditation.
If you wake up and have no idea what’s on your schedule, where you have to be, or what you’re going to wear, then your day is already off to a frantic start.
Psychologist and Certified Master Coach Joel Ingersoll recommends organizing your day the night before.
“Eating a healthy breakfast consisting of nuts, fruits, and oats will satisfy your brain to get you through a tough day at the office,” LoGreco says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “15 Daily Habits Highly Successful People Have”

“Every day, I dedicate a period of about 30 to 60 minutes when I turn off all electronics, and most of the time this aligns with my daily exercise. This daily digital detox allows my mind to wander to what really matters, eliminating any distractions from others. I use this time to check in with myself, set personal priorities and focus on important issues for both myself and my business. I’ve found that these small breaks give me a sense of peace and help me better navigate everyday business decisions.”
Jake Crandall, founder and owner of Oklahoma-based Okie CrossFit and Okie CrossFit Tahlequah who once weighed 300 pounds and has since helped 13 people lose more than 100 pounds and over 100 people lose more than 50 pounds.
“If you can’t see well, you can’t work well. Stay productive by giving your eyes a break throughout the day so they aren’t strained from focusing on your computer screen all day.”
Alex Maleki, VP of business development at tech incubator Idealab which has created more than 150 companies with more than 45 IPOs and acquisitions.
“A most important habit of success is the monitoring of daily nutrition. But by that, I am not talking about what successful people eat or drink. I am talking about what they feed themselves through what they, read, what they listen to, who they talk to and what they watch. In every day, the truly great ones I have had the chance to work with use a piece of that day to feed themselves something that will give them an inspirational advantage over those they’re competing against. Whether it is looking for inspirational quotes, watching videos of people offering lessons on excellence, or reading a chapter in a book that will help them in their journey, there is a piece of every day that is committed to growth.”
Adam Fingerman, cofounder and chief experience officer for ArcTouch, a San Francisco-based mobile app development company that has designed more than 400 custom apps for more than 150 clients, ranging from Fortune 500 companies to influential startups.
“It comes down to taking care of yourself-your body, mind and spirit. I have a regular exercise regimen. I start every day with a 40- to 50-minute workout: a combination of cardio, core strength and resistance training. During the day, you need to eat great food that fuels you without robbing energy, drink lots of water and stay hydrated. It’s amazing how much water your body needs during the day.”
Hunter Muller, president and CEO of HMG Strategy, LLC, an international network of more than 300,000 technology leaders, search executives, and technology partners which has hosted more than 70 live events in the U.S., Canada and Europe.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Wizard of Oz: Five Appalling On-Set Stories”

“They told me to get the hell back to work,” Ebsen said.
When the studio was told that Ebsen-whose skin had turned blue during his reaction-could not immediately return, production replaced him with Jack Haley.
Though the aluminum makeup was changed, it still caused Haley a serious eye infection.
In lesser makeup horror stories, actor Ray Bolger-who played the Scarecrow-removed the rubber prosthetics mask from his face the last day of filming to discover he had burlap scars around his mouth and chin.
Margaret Hamilton’s friend alerted her, about a month and a half before filming ended, that she looked “So odd.” When she looked in the mirror, the actor realized the friend was right: Her Wicked Witch of the West makeup had “Sunk into my skin. It must have been months before my face was really normal again.”
Sadly for the actors playing the Tin Man, Scarecrow, and Cowardly Lion, they were also banned from eating lunch inside the MGM cafeteria because the sight of them eating in their makeup was deemed too disgusting.
In the days before computer-generated effects, film crews had to rely on practical tricks to simulate snow.
It wasn’t just The Wizard of Oz that relied on asbestos-laced snow-that substance was also used in the ’30s in holiday decorations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Six Hours Of Sleep Is As Bad As None At All”

Subjects in a lab-based sleep study who were allowed to get only six hours of sleep a night for two weeks straight functioned as poorly as those who were forced to stay awake for two days straight.
This sleep deprivation study, published in the journal Sleep, took 48 adults and restricted their sleep to a maximum of four, six, or eight hours a night for two weeks; one unlucky subset was deprived of sleep for three days straight.
In the last few days of the experiment, the subjects who were restricted to a maximum of six hours of sleep per night showed cognitive performance that was as bad as the people who weren’t allowed to sleep at all.
Getting only six hours of shut-eye was as bad as not sleeping for two days straight.
Another sleep study published in Epidemiology, indicates people generally overestimate their nightly sleep by around 0.8 hours.
If you think you sleep seven hours a night, as one out of every three Americans does, it’s entirely possible you’re only getting six.
Even just a little bit of sleep deprivation, in this case, six rather than eight hours of sleep across two weeks, accumulates to jaw-dropping results.
Fixing bad sleep habits to get enough sleep is easier said than done.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Colin O’Brady Wants to Tell You a Story”

For 54 days, O’Brady had trudged alone, fighting whiteouts and howling wind.
O’Brady hadn’t seen Rudd since day six, when the captain had shuffled up beside him in a whiteout.
As news of O’Brady’s victory made its way around the world, ExplorersWeb, an online hub for expedition news that “Makes sure credit is given where credit is due,” pushed back and noted what many in the media had failed to mention-that for the last 300-plus miles of the crossing, O’Brady had followed a man-made “Snow road,” the South Pole Overland Traverse.
When O’Brady takes the stage during lunchtime at the Riverhouse, he tells his story masterfully.
At this point, the story of Colin O’Brady takes off in a rocking montage.
In the early days of his triathlon career, O’Brady made Besaw his manager.
At the time, only two people had completed the Explorers Grand Slam in under a year, but O’Brady did it in 139 days, beating the previous record by 53 days.
At the top of Snow King, Besaw reminds O’Brady of the day’s schedule.

The orginal article.

Summary of “31 Ways to Improve Your Life in Just a Month”

Remind yourself frequently that the purpose of your life is not to work 10 hours per day, five days per week for 30 years, then retire to a golf course in Florida.
Day 6: Stop getting the attention and focus it on other people.
Day 14: Journal about three new things you are grateful for.
Psychologist Shawn Achor told Oprah that you train your brain to be optimistic if you do this for 21 days in a row: Each day, write down three new things you are grateful for.
Day 23: Have lunch with someone, and listen to that person selflessly.
Day 25: Look at people in the eye, smile, and say hello.
Elderly people have a rich and long history full of stories, experiences, and perspectives you’ve never thought of from simpler days gone by.
What would your life look like if you practiced some of these things everyday, extending this plan beyond a 31-day cycle? It just might help you live the life you’ve always wanted rather than settling for whatever comes your way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “31 Ways to Improve Your Life in Just a Month”

Remind yourself frequently that the purpose of your life is not to work 10 hours per day, five days per week for 30 years, then retire to a golf course in Florida.
Day 6: Stop getting the attention and focus it on other people.
Day 14: Journal about three new things you are grateful for.
Psychologist Shawn Achor told Oprah that you train your brain to be optimistic if you do this for 21 days in a row: Each day, write down three new things you are grateful for.
Day 23: Have lunch with someone, and listen to that person selflessly.
Day 25: Look at people in the eye, smile, and say hello.
Elderly people have a rich and long history full of stories, experiences, and perspectives you’ve never thought of from simpler days gone by.
What would your life look like if you practiced some of these things everyday, extending this plan beyond a 31-day cycle? It just might help you live the life you’ve always wanted rather than settling for whatever comes your way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Total Recall: The People Who Never Forget”

The HSAM subjects turned out to be far better than people with average memories at recalling long-past autobiographical data; in memories that could be verified, they were correct 87% of the time.
Significantly, research shows that people with average memories are bad at temporally placing remembered events – we don’t have a sense of whether that thing happened two weeks ago or two months ago.
Plenty of people rehearse their memories and don’t have HSAM, and plenty of people with OCD don’t have incredible recall of their autobiographical memories.
Despite their amazing recall there is one way that HSAM subjects are just like everyone else – they are just as prone to memory “Distortions”, the editing, assumptions, conflation of time, and other discrepancies that are part and parcel of making memories.
In a study published in 2013, Dr Lawrence Patihis, a memory researcher at the University of Southern Mississippi working with scientists at UCI, asked 20 HSAM subjects and 38 people with standard memories to participate in a series of tests designed to assess their susceptibility to false memories.
When people with average memory recall an experience, it is formed not only by what they think happened and how they felt at the time, but by what they know and feel now.
First, the initial process of encoding memories – that is, when the brain makes an experience into a memory, translating elements of that experience into a network of neurons and synaptic connections – seems no different for people with HSAM than for the rest of us.
For all the terrible things that people with HSAM can never forget, there are also wonderful memories.

The orginal article.