Summary of “How to Survive Dropping Your Kid Off at College”

You worry about money, but dread paying that big holiday-season credit-card bill.
You worry about work, but dread the big sales presentation.
Dread arises from the looming shadow of certainty, while fear tracks the murky unknown.
Dread is fueled by powerlessness, rather than by sorrow, and there’s more reason for kids to feel impotent these days with the internet and smartphones.
Anxiety has overtaken depression among teenagers-kids are bombarded with so many demands that are nonnegotiable, they become overwhelmed by the accompanying dread. As the ASU psychologist Suniya Luthar told The New York Times last year, teenagers “Never get to the point where they can say, ‘I’ve done enough, and now I can stop.'”.
There are a lot of people struggling just to get by for whom dread may still be a common feeling.
Going off to college represents an unusual, shared experience of dread for parents and their children alike.
That makes the college departure a rare opportunity for parents to rekindle their relationship with dread, and maybe even to reform it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ubang: The Nigerian village where men and women speak different languages”

In Ubang, a farming community in southern Nigeria, men and women say they speak different languages.
Dressed in a brightly coloured traditional outfit, a red chief’s cap and holding a staff, Chief Oliver Ibang calls over his two young children, eager to demonstrate the different languages.
It is not clear exactly what proportion of words are different in the two languages and there is no pattern, such as whether the words are commonly used, related or linked to traditional roles for men or women.
God’s plan was to give each ethnic group two languages, but after creating the two languages for the Ubang, he realised there were not enough languages to go around, he explains.
“So he stopped. That’s why Ubang has the benefit of two languages – we are different from other people in the world.”
“They hardly speak pure Ubang languages without mixing an English word.”
“We need text books in Ubang languages – novels, art, films – and they should allow us to teach the languages in schools,” he says.
“If the languages die, then the Ubang people will exist no more.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is psychedelics research closer to theology than to science?”

The first is that psychedelics lead to a mystical experience of unitive, non-dual consciousness, in which all is one, you are united with It, God, the Tao, Brahman, etc.
Now psychedelics have revealed a predictable and replicable route to mystical experiences, so scientists can study them in the lab.
The millenarian hope bubbling below the cool, detached surface of the psychedelic renaissance is apparent if you read Sacred Knowledge: Psychedelics and Religious Experience by William Richards, a psychologist at the Johns Hopkins psychedelic lab.
Unitive non-dual experiences are more true, while dualist experiences are less true.
Even with the same substance, different cultures frame psychedelic experiences in different ways, leading to different experiences, as Andy Letcher argues in Shroom: A Cultural History of the Magic Mushroom.
Western spiritual tourists can have a culturally naive idea that their experience of ayahuasca is the same as indigenous people’s experience, that everyone goes to the same Magic Kingdom where we all meet the same entity: Mama Ayahuasca.
European psychedelic laboratories, such as those at Imperial College London or in Zurich, tend to frame psychedelics less in the language of ‘mystical experience’, and more in the secular Freudian language of ‘ego-death’ or ‘psychosis-like states’.
Predictably enough, as Nicolas Langlitz points out in Neuropsychedelia: The Revival of Hallucinogen Research Since the Decade of the Brain, participants in European psychedelic trials report fewer mystical-type experiences than in US trials.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The AI revolution has spawned a new chips arms race”

Google has a special AI chip for neural networks call the Tensor Processing Unit, or TPU, which is available for AI apps on the Google Cloud Platform.
IBM is developing specific AI processor, and the company also licensed NVLink from Nvidia for high-speed data throughput specific to AI and ML. Even non-traditional tech companies like Tesla want in on this area, with CEO Elon Musk acknowledging last year that former AMD and Apple chip engineer Jim Keller would be building hardware for the car company.
Why do we need more chips now, and so many different ones at that?
While x86 currently remains a dominant chip architecture for computing, it’s too general purpose for a highly specialized task like AI, says Addison Snell, CEO of Intersect360 Research, which covers HPC and AI issues.
The actual task of processing AI is a very different process from standard computing or GPU processing, hence the perceived need for specialized chips.
“Chips on the edge won’t compete with chips for the data center,” he says.
“Data center chips like Xeon have to have high performance capabilities for that kind of AI, which is different for AI in smartphones. There you have to get down below one watt. So the question is, ‘Where is not good enough so you need an accessory chip?'”.
A desire for more specialization and increased energy efficiency isn’t the whole reason these newer AI chips exist, of course.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These are the 19 ways your dog is secretly communicating with you”

Scientists have discovered dogs use 19 signals dogs to try and communicate with their human pals.
Footage of 37 dogs filmed by their owners during day-to-day task showed them the pooches were often seemingly using similar movements to express what they wanted.
The scientists think the dogs were, on several occasions, asking for a door to be opened, expressing they wanted to be fed or hoping their owner would get a toy.
Such as wanting food, were shown through many different gestures – basically dogs are keen to be fed at all times – others appeared quite distinctive.
Sometimes the dogs were found to try different signals if their first go at telling their owner what they wanted wasn’t successful.
The most common gesture appeared to be a head turn – which is when a dog looks from a human to an object to show they are interested in it.
Last year researchers found that dogs raise their eyebrows when they are looked at, a mechanism which makes their eyes appear bigger.
It seems humans are able to also figure out what their four-legged friend is trying to say when they bark and growl – with women better placed to know if a dog is being playful or aggressive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These are the 19 ways your dog is secretly communicating with you”

Scientists have discovered dogs use 19 signals dogs to try and communicate with their human pals.
Footage of 37 dogs filmed by their owners during day-to-day task showed them the pooches were often seemingly using similar movements to express what they wanted.
The scientists think the dogs were, on several occasions, asking for a door to be opened, expressing they wanted to be fed or hoping their owner would get a toy.
Such as wanting food, were shown through many different gestures – basically dogs are keen to be fed at all times – others appeared quite distinctive.
Sometimes the dogs were found to try different signals if their first go at telling their owner what they wanted wasn’t successful.
The most common gesture appeared to be a head turn – which is when a dog looks from a human to an object to show they are interested in it.
Last year researchers found that dogs raise their eyebrows when they are looked at, a mechanism which makes their eyes appear bigger.
It seems humans are able to also figure out what their four-legged friend is trying to say when they bark and growl – with women better placed to know if a dog is being playful or aggressive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tax rates and take home salaries for 40 countries”

It is well known that every country has a different corporate tax rate, but each one also has different tax rates for individuals.
CapRelo published a study on tax rates and take home salaries in 40 countries, including the United States, Germany, and China.
Often, salary comparisons in different countries don’t include tax rates.
The higher a country’s tax rate, the bigger the difference between annual pay and take-home pay once taxes are taken out.
A couple of countries in the report have practical tax rates over 50%, while two nations are essentially tax-free for the median earner.
Below, the individual tax rate in 40 countries, ranked from highest tax rates to the lowest.
The tax rate is what someone making the nation’s average wage would pay.
The average citizen’s pay before and after taxes is also included for each country.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Two Photographers Unknowingly Shot the Same Millisecond in Time”

After letting the commenter know that it was indeed my image and that I possess the original RAW file, I headed over to the other photographers page and was blown away.
We had what looked like the exact same image, taken at the exact millisecond in time, from what looked like the same exact location and perspective.
The white caps were identical in size and shape – and I know those things are easily moved using the clone stamp in Photoshop – so I was concerned that maybe MY image was stolen and altered a bit.
As mentioned already, there were many differences in the foreground water and the white caps on the horizon, and it was these differences that held me back from claiming he stole my image.
The next morning Eric woke up to a flood of messages from me as well as other photographers, and immediately contacted me to share his EXIF data, and to agree that it was astounding that we both captured the exact same image of water motion at the exact millisecond in time.
I did a Google search to see how often this happens and could only find one article from 2011 where two photographers filming a surf competition on Huntington Beach ended up catching a virtually identical image of a surfer and its wave action.
If you shoot water in burst mode you know how different each exposure is even when the difference in time is just 1/7th of a second between shots.
I have been leading night-sky photography workshops for five years and have had well over 200 photographers who are often aiming at the same subject, shooting with similar cameras and lenses, and capturing at the same moment in time, even doing continuous shooting for time lapse, and until now I have never seen two images that were so close as to be virtual clones of each other.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Olympic Challenge: Eat All the Korean Food That Visitors Won’t”

In our conversation, David Chang said it had been frustrating at times to see that Korean food – beyond bibimbap, barbecue and kimchi – was still so inscrutable for so many people he encountered during the Olympics.
Among his pet peeves, he said, was how non-Koreans used Japanese names to describe Korean dishes: Hwe, sliced raw fish, is not sashimi, he said, his voice rising again; dduk, rice cakes, can be pretty different from mochi; and kimbap, rice rolled inside seaweed with various vegetables or meats, should never, ever, be called maki.
“It’s like having to explain that French and Italian food are different,” Chang said.
Still, Chang concedes, sometimes people might need reference points.
At the opening ceremony Chang bought eomuk, or fish cakes, at a concession stand, which provoked some bewilderment among his non-Korean companions.
I’ve been lucky to have the company of Chang W. Lee, a Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times photographer raised in South Korea, and more important for me, a soul mate in gluttony.
A lot of the dinners have ended the same way: with a second dinner.
“I’ve never had a food marathon like this,” he said, his chopsticks in a bowl of noodles.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Enduring Power of Otis Redding’s ‘Dock of the Bay'”

Like most of the world, Redding spent the summer of 1967 listening to the Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.” “He thought it was the greatest thing he ever heard,” Ms. Redding said, speaking from her office in Georgia.
In August 1967, Redding returned to San Francisco for a week of shows at the jazz club Basin Street West.
Redding spent his days quietly looking at the water; freed from the usual demands of travel, he could relax and write songs.
His road manager, Earl Sims, said he was the only witness the day Redding picked up his guitar and wrote a new song that began “Sittin’ in the morning sun/I’ll be sittin’ when the evening comes.”
Steve Cropper, who regularly backed Redding up as the guitarist for Booker T. and the MG’s, remembered Redding calling him from the Memphis airport to make sure he was at the studio.
In an interview, Mr. Jones remembered the sessions as having “Kind of a hectic feeling – so much so that I remember a number of people sleeping over at the studio.” Redding and Mr. Cropper planned to ask the Staple Singers to contribute backing vocals to “Dock of the Bay,” which never happened.
The whistling at the song’s end came in a section earmarked for vocal ad-libbing; on one early take, Redding sputtered and the engineer Ron Capone told him, “You’re not going to make it as a whistler.”
In the middle of the sessions, Redding went back on the road. “I’ll see you on Monday,” were his last words to Mr. Cropper.

The orginal article.