Summary of “The 10 Commandments of Emotional Intelligence”

Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify emotions, to recognize the powerful effects of those emotions, and to use that information to inform and guide behavior.
Emotional Intelligence begins by learning to ask the right questions, like “What is my current mood, and how might that influence my decisions today?” or “What are my strengths and weaknesses?”.
II. Thou shalt learn from other perspectives.
Acknowledge your mistakes and apologize when appropriate, and you’ll develop qualities like humility and authenticity, naturally drawing others to you.
VIII. Thou shalt not freeze others in time.
Refuse the temptation to judge others too quickly, without considering context and extenuating circumstances.
Emotional intelligence isn’t about achieving perfection, or reaching a certain level of “EQ.” It’s about continuous learning and growth.
Yes, it’s often when you feel you’ve “Mastered” one of these 10 commandments that you will make your greatest mistakes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Accepting your darkest emotions is the key to reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety, and improving mental wellbeing”

Psychological studies have shown that acceptance of those negative emotions is the more reliable route to regaining and maintaining peace of mind.
Whether practiced through the lens of ancient Eastern philosophies, or in increasingly popular forms of treatment like Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy, acceptance of one’s dark emotions is now backed by a body of evidence connecting the habit to better emotional resilience, and fewer symptoms of depression and anxiety.
Not quite a strategy, she tells Quartz, “Acceptance involves not trying to change how we are feeling, but staying in touch with your feelings and taking them for what they are.” So, she asks, how can it be that accepting negative emotions is paradoxically linked to long-term psychological thriving?
“You always interpret null effects very cautiously,” Ford says, “But to us, it appears that acceptance uniquely affects negative emotions, and isn’t interfering with positive emotions.”
What’s more, acceptance seems to be linked to better mental health when it’s used in response to negative emotions, not positive ones, she adds, so this is not about living in the world with a “Broadly detached attitude.” No need to play it too cool.
“You need to pay attention to your internal experience,” says Ford, “But acceptance, non-judging acceptance, seems to be the key ingredient to mindfulness.”
Habitually accepting negative emotions was found to not only reduce feelings of ill-being, but also was more likely to lead to elevated levels of well-being.
Their baseline acceptance habits were measured before the diary-writing period, and their general psychological well-being was measured through standardized questionnaires six months later.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A 3-Step Process to Break a Cycle of Frustration, Stress, and Fighting at Work”

Bring to mind a conflict at work, and you’ll probably have the perpetrator in mind: your incompetent boss, that passive-aggressive colleague, or the resource-hoarding peer in another department.
Frustration, low-grade fear, irritation, and even rage are familiar companions at work.
We don’t thrive physically, we are disengaged and unhappy at work, and our brains don’t work properly.
If you want to break this cycle and have fewer destructive conflicts at work, the first step is to become more aware of your feelings and reactions to pressure and stress.
Telling yourself you don’t have time or are not inclined to “Work on yourself” will keep you stuck in a bunker mentality at work.
To minimize stress and conflict at work, we need to replace “I, me, mine” with “We, us, ours.” We need to stop seeing each other in terms of what we can get, and replace it with what we can give.
Developing self-awareness, increasing your emotional self-control, and recharging relationships at work takes commitment, but you don’t have to remake yourself to improve how you deal with strife.
As tempting as it is to blame others for our strife-ridden companies, the best way to make work a more enjoyable, productive experience is to lean in to our natural empathy, learn to care for ourselves and others, and take responsibility for our feelings and actions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 13-Minute Definitive Guide To Living Your Dreams”

As will be shown, what keeps you stuck is your suppressed emotions, subconscious patterns, and environmental signals.
As Dr. Joseph Murphy put it, “What is impressed in the subconscious is expressed.” Consequently, the only way to be, do, and have more than you currently have is to “Retrain”your subconscious mind.
Retraining your subconscious is best done immediately before and after you sleep.
While awake, your conscious and subconscious mind are often at odds with each other.
Theta state occurs directly in the threshold of your subconscious, and is associated with the deepest levels of meditation.
As Dr. Joseph Murphy explains in, The Power of Your Subconscious Mind, “You avoid conflict between your conscious and subconscious in the sleepy state. Imagine the fulfillment of your desire over and over again prior to sleep. Sleep in peace and wake in joy.”
You’ll demonstrate to your subconscious self that you are not interested, or not ready to make the changes you’re priming your subconscious to create.
“People are active, dynamic, and interesting; these are the stimulus properties that direct attention. The situation, in contrast, is normally relatively static and often known only hazily. What you attend to is what you attribute to.”Most people fail to retrain their subconscious mind because the signals in their environment continually reinforce unhealthy patterns.

The orginal article.