Summary of “It’s Okay to Be Good and Not Great”

It sounds appealing and rolls off the tongue nicely, but there’s a good chance it’s downright wrong.
It’s about being at least OK with where you are, about accepting good enough.
What’s interesting is that not always trying so damn hard to be great isn’t just the path to being happier; it’s also the path to getting better.
It’s about being good enough over and over again.
A good-enough mindset might very well be the key to being great and happy.
During the times you were happiest and performed best, were you striving? Were you chasing after something? Or were you more like Kipchoge-grounded, at peace, and feeling good enough with what was in front of you? This doesn’t mean you should never desire productive change or improvement.
Though they may run counter to so much of the current ethos, adopting the following core principles of good enough is likely the best route to being happier and getting better.
The research of University of Houston professor Brene Brown demonstrates that the more you can bring your entire self to everything you do-the good, the bad, the sad, and the ugly-the better you’ll feel and the better you’ll be.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emotional resilience in the workplace”

Inward-facing EQ. Emotional intelligence encompasses more than navigating social interactions.
These inward dimensions of EQ, self-awareness, and emotional discipline can seed professional success.
Yes, emotional awareness/emotional discipline are parts of EQ. For instance, if you tend to feel annoyed or angered by a colleague or your boss, it is important to label the feeling, to understand the triggers for this emotion, and how to manage it when engaging with this individual.
Emotional intelligence means understanding people, including ourselves.
Orbé-Austin explains: “To be emotionally disciplined means to recognize how to handle different emotions at certain times. For instance, if you are receiving critical feedback, while it may be upsetting, it is important to know that it may not serve you well to respond in an angry manner. Emotional discipline allows you to respond appropriately to the expectations of the setting and the audience, to make the impression you wish to make.”
Enacting emotional discipline is a practiced skill, and it can be especially helpful for leaders.
Orbé-Austin points out, “As a leader, part of emotional discipline is to model suitable behavior. For instance, during a crisis, your team may not want you to appear overwhelmed or out of control. You might talk about the challenges and some of your concerns, but it may need to be in a measured way, which provides confidence and hope to your team.”
Perhaps Rivera’s emotional discipline is the best attribute any professional can have.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The age of envy: how to be happy when everyone else’s life looks perfect”

To explore the role that envy plays in our use of social media, Kross and his team designed a study to consider the relationship between passive Facebook use – “Just voyeuristically scrolling,” as he puts it – and envy and mood from moment to moment.
The results were striking, he says: “The more you’re on there scrolling away, the more that elicits feelings of envy, which in turn predicts drops in how good you feel”.
No age group or social class is immune from envy, according to Andrew.
In her consulting room she sees young women, self-conscious about how they look, who begin to follow certain accounts on Instagram to find hair inspiration or makeup techniques, and end up envying the women they follow and feeling even worse about themselves.
While we are busy finding the perfect camera angle, our lives become a dazzling, flawless carapace, empty inside but for the envy of others and ourselves, in a world where black cats languish in animal shelters because they are not “Selfie-friendly”.
“Envy is wanting to destroy what someone else has. Not just wanting it for yourself, but wanting other people not to have it. It’s a deep-rooted issue, where you are very, very resentful of another person’s wellbeing – whether that be their looks, their position or the car they have. It is silent, destructive, underhand – it is pure malice, pure hatred,” she says.
She believes envy is not innate; that it starts with an experience of early deprivation, when a mother cannot bond with her baby, and that child’s self-esteem is not nourished through his or her life.
Perhaps each of us also needs to think more carefully when we do use social media actively, about what we are trying to say and why – and how the curation of our online personas can contribute to this age of envy in which we live.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Race and Pop Culture: A Roundtable Conversation”

Yes, the religious right was attacking the NEA and major art institutions, but the white liberal critical establishment was also attacking works by people of color and dismissing it as “Identity politics.” There is the game-changing Whitney Biennial in 1992 that featured works by predominantly people of color that was a critique of the art institution itself and made critics practically apoplectic.
When it comes to critiquing POC-fronted works, how do you see the conversation playing out differently among white critics and critics of color? Does it ever feel like there are separate conversations happening? Relatedly, do you ever feel like it’s not “Your place” to critique a work? And do you think that applies to other critics?
Which on one hand, I do think some critics of color who are new to the game do not know how to balance talking about aesthetics, the history of the medium, and the political dimension of a work.
It’s been depressing to me the degree to which the conversation about POC creators has focused on getting to make mainstream work and be hired by large media companies but so much less on elevating work made outside the system.
EAJ: It’s funny how many critics have coded work by women and people of color as personal or “Autobiographical,” whereas work by white men is somehow transcendent of that.
As much as we can’t separate those the art and the artist, does it ever feel like it simplifies the conversation around art, where a “Good person” translates to a “Good work” and a bad person therefore creates “Bad work.” For example, after the Junot Díaz controversy, in which he was accused of sexual misconduct, there was a lot of criticism of his previous work – was some of it valid, and did some of it conflate him with his work?
EAJ: There is a conflation happening around personhood and the work itself that’s now part of “Branding.” You definitely see some people trying to use that as cover to inoculate themselves from criticism.
Let’s talk about how art and politics intersect in 2018, when it comes to the work itself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to make your remote workforce feel appreciated”

4 minute Read. Research has found that recognition can go a long way in improving employee productivity and engagement, but now managers and employers are challenged to extend their gratitude to an increasingly remote workforce.
As the workforce becomes more remote, White believes it’s similarly vital for businesses to understand how they can best extend that feeling of appreciation to their offsite staff.
While the order of most appreciated forms of gratitude remains the same for remote employees, White’s latest research found that they are more likely to value quality time with colleagues than those who work in-house.
While only 25% of in-house staff most valued time with colleagues, that number increases to 35% for remote staff, which is almost on par with their appreciation for words of affirmation from superiors.
According to Shopify’s remote employee experience specialist, Chivon John, those who work with remote employees should strive to foster a remote-first approach to communications, even among in-house staff.
John, who helps manage the e-commerce platforms extensive remote workforce, adds that when it comes to internal communications it’s similarly important to establish company-wide rules of engagement for remote staff, especially those working in different time zones.
“It’s important to encourage your staff and your teams to input into their calendar the remote staff member’s working hours,” she says.
While maintaining a personal relationship with managers can help remote staff feel more connected to the office culture, many, according to White’s research, prefer having casual relationships with colleagues based on mutual, non-work-related interests.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘I’m surrounded by people”

It’s tempting to conclude that something about modern life is putting young people at a higher risk of loneliness, but when we asked older people in our survey about the loneliest times in their lives, they also said it was when they were young.
The survey suggested that younger people felt more able to tell others about their loneliness than older people, but still many young people who feel lonely told us they felt ashamed about it.
“Michelle has found it both helps and hinders.”Through blogging, people have been in touch and that’s great – but when I am at my lowest, going on Instagram and seeing people having these amazing lives and enjoying themselves does make you feel, ‘Why can’t I have that?’.
“The frustration is that I am confident enough to go up to people and chat, but I have to wait for people to come to me. It does mean the friends I have are really special though, because they’re the kind of people who persevered. I appreciate the friends I have so much more because I don’t have many of them.”
“If people start stroking the dog I’ll use that to start a conversation, but quite a lot of people just walk off. Sometimes I feel I’m overshadowed by my dog. I know I’m not cute and furry but I do have something to offer.”
Sometimes it’s suggested that people experiencing loneliness need to learn the social skills that would help them to make friends, but we found that people who felt lonely had social skills that were just as high as everyone else’s.
People told us the most unhelpful suggestion that other people make is to go on dates.
Lots of people have been getting in touch with her about going to gigs and she’s thinking about whether she could start some kind of social club in London for other young people who feel lonely and like music.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Birth Plan for Dying”

Around noon the day River was born, something changed.
We went to the soccer stadium and stood in the fan section next to the drums and trumpets, so River could feel the bass thrum.
In every minute we were aware not just of losing River, but also of having River.
“It’s making very difficult decisions with imperfect information, and trying to do right by them. You are River’s mother, and right now, you are being her mother.”
I needed to give birth to River, to say hello so I could say goodbye.
In some hospitals, River’s birth would have been impossible.
If words compose a kind of map of what’s possible – what it’s possible to think, to feel, to do – then my map has new territories on it I couldn’t have imagined before: The island called “I Held My Dead Child.” The ocean called “I Killed My Daughter” The volcano called “I Promised Myself I Would Not Feel Regret.” A new supercontinent, veined with rivers that murmur and murmur and murmur their own name.
Three months after River was born, I sat in a rocking chair looking at rain materialize from an endless grey cloud shrouding the Columbia River.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘The people’s yogi’: how Adriene Mishler became a YouTube phenomenon”

The woman is 33-year-old yogi and actor Adriene Mishler, and this is the largest live yoga class she has ever held – she is more frequently to be found teaching alone in front of her camera at home in Austin, Texas, than IRL. And it is this intimate version of her that 4 million subscribers to her Yoga with Adriene YouTube channel have come to know and share their homes with.
Search “Yoga” on Google, and Adriene dominates.
The yoga community can feel intimidating – bodies contorted for aspirational Instagram posts, or studios where you are pushed uncomfortably deep into poses – but Adriene has positioned herself in opposition to the unrealistically ascetic side.
“I used to make margarita jokes, just to get people to see that yoga is not only for people who sit in lotus all day and sip yogi tea.” She measures her language carefully: “I don’t want to criticise people doing the pretzel [poses], but I think there’s a lack of awareness.”
For Krohn, “Adriene was the first teacher who really got me to understand that yoga was about more than just physical flexibility or that kind of ego-driven thing that goes with modern yoga.” Bradley came to yoga because she has arthritis – Adriene has, she says, helped her find some acceptance: “This is where you are you can still do things but don’t push it, find what you can do.”
With millions of people able to access her yoga for free, I’ll get to critiques of her motivation once I’ve untangled from pigeon pose.
Once a trailblazer, Adriene is now one of a host of online yoga teachers bringing an ancient practice to a mass, modern audience.
She weighs up the next words, almost egging herself on: “I want all the people who voted for Trump to do my yoga. I want all the people who battle with the experience of racism to do yoga.” There’s that yoga for all message again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Help a Colleague Who Seems Off Their Game”

The first step is to let your colleague know that you’ve noticed they’re off their game.
You can’t force a colleague to disclose what’s going on with them, but just letting them know that you’ve noticed that they seem to be acting differently shows them that someone out there is paying attention.
Beyond just stating that you’ve observed that your colleague is struggling, you can also help to validate the difficulty of being productive.
It’s likely your colleague thinks they are unique in their concerns and frustrations.
First, it may help your colleague recognize that their feelings about work are not a sign that they don’t belong in their job.
Then you might be helping a colleague to make the decision to pursue other opportunities.
More likely, your colleague is suited to their job but is having trouble getting things done.
You need to be careful that helping your colleague doesn’t drain your energy or hurt your performance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to write the perfect sentence”

The sentence is our writing commons, the shared ground where all writers walk.
For James Baldwin, the only goal was “To write a sentence as clean as a bone”.
Some of this is true but none of it is a good way of learning how to write a sentence.
They fasten on content and forget about form – forgetting that content and form are the same thing, that what a sentence says is the same as how it says it.
Like every skilled writer Woolf starkly varies sentence length.
A good lesson for any writer: make each sentence worth reading, and something in it will lead the reader into the next one.
A decade ago the American writer Gary Lutz gave a lecture to Columbia University students titled “The sentence is a lonely place”.
Good writers write not just in sentences but with sentences.

The orginal article.