Summary of “but Are Oblivious to Their Weaknesses”

Yet what we see when we administer 360-degree feedback surveys on behalf of these leaders is that the executives with really low scores in one or more areas are often completely unaware of their fatal flaws.
Let us explain what we mean by a “Fatal flaw.” Everyone has weaknesses, but over the course of administering assessments to tens of thousands of leaders, we have found that most of the time that mild weaknesses do not impact a person’s overall effectiveness.
These are weaknesses that are so extreme that they can have a dramatic negative effect on a leader, seriously hampering their contribution to the organization and their career progress.
Why are weaknesses and fatal flaws so hard for us to spot in ourselves? Here’s our theory.
Weaknesses – especially fatal flaws – are the opposite.
Fatal flaws are “Sins of omission.” They’re a result of inaction, of the leader not doing something.
We occasionally do find leaders whose fatal flaws are “Sins of commission” – like a boss with a terrible temper, or an executive who lies – but those people are very rare.
If roughly one-third of leaders have a fatal flaw and you are sitting in a management meeting, look to your right and then to your left.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 traits all emotionally intelligent leaders share”

Empathy, self-awareness and authenticity are just some of the traits that make certain leaders stand out.
Some of the most revered leaders in business today share common traits that attract great staff and inspire the best work.
If you aspire to be a better leader, you would do well to work on your emotional intelligence quotient.
Great leaders are able to look at issues from many different perspectives and to consider the effects from other points of view.
Great leaders can be positive in the face of difficulty and still be very much in touch with the situation.
Great leaders know that getting to know their team members – professionally and personally – and caring about them and their careers will mean that everyone works better together in the long run.
How to practice: Your integrity is paramount to your reputation as a leader, so only say what you mean and don’t make promises you can’t keep.
Every chance to work on your skills will make you a better leader, no matter the location.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How You Promote People Can Make or Break Company Culture”

We surveyed over 400,000 U.S. workers in the past year and found that when people believe promotions are managed effectively, they’re more than twice as likely to give extra effort at work and to plan a long-term future with their company.
A solid promotions process allows leaders to elevate each employee to their full potential – while showing the company what type of results and behaviors are valued.
If promotions aren’t managed well, one person’s success can foster feelings of resentment in others, and the career aspirations of employees across the company can be left unrealized.
Setting the stage for effective promotions starts with defining each team member’s long-term aspirations, so you both know how they will contribute as the business grows – and how you can best support them.
A common complaint employees have about their company’s promotions practice is a sense that by the time the job is posted, “The fix is already in.” Regardless of how transparent the opportunity is, they believe there is already a preferred candidate who will get the position.
Rather than rehash criteria from the job description, share inspiring stories and examples of how the individual consistently met the criteria, and also, how their promotion benefits the broader team.
He went on to share how he routinely anchors promotions announcements with recognition of people on the team who strengthened the business’ ability invest in a new role.
By systematically empowering leaders at every level to use these principles within their teams, results will be remarkable as more people across the company re-connect with their aspirations, feel a sense of sponsorship, extend trust to leaders when promotions decisions are made, and get excited about what’s possible as a valued member of a winning team.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 4 Kinds of Leaders Who Create the Future”

Alan Kay, the educator and computer designer, famously declared, “The best way to predict the future is to invent it.” But what does it take to invent the future in such a turbulent and uncertain world? How do successful organizations build on their history, even as they craft a new point of view about what comes next? How do established brands stay true to their original promise, while also making themselves relevant to new customers with different values and preferences? How can accomplished executives be sure that all they know – their hard-earned wisdom and expertise – doesn’t limit what they can imagine?
His favorite question to colleagues, a test of their zeal for learning, is, “When’s the last time you did something for the first time?” Leaders who are fit for the future are determined keep learning as fast as the world is changing.
All too often, senior leaders allow what they know to limit what they can imagine That’s a big problem: You can’t invent the future if you cling to out-of-date ideas, even if they’ve worked in the past.
“Too often,” she warns, “Pride in your most recent idea becomes a barrier to seeing your next idea.” Leaders who are fit for the future understand when it’s time to disrupt themselves.
John Gardner, the legendary scholar of organizational life, argues that great leaders exude “Tough-minded optimism.” The future, he says, “Is not shaped by people who don’t really believe in the future. It is created by highly motivated people, by enthusiasts, by men and women who want something very much or believe very much.”
You can’t invent a prosperous future for your company unless you are excited about what the future holds.
That’s why leaders who are fit for the future are support lots of ideas, knowing that most of them won’t deliver as planned, to discover the few that will deliver bigger than anyone imagined.
“And if they’re experiments, you don’t know ahead of time if they’re going to work.” Leaders who are fit for the future understand that there is no success without setbacks, no progress without pitfalls.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Executives Fail to Execute Strategy Because They’re Too Internally Focused”

Here are four of the most common signs that an executive is likely to fail when attempting to bring the organization’s strategy to life.
One study reports that 70% of leaders spend on average one day a month reviewing strategy and 85% of leadership teams spend less than an hour per month discussing strategy.
Too many executives fail to learn the basic competitive and financial context of their own organizations prior to assuming senior-level jobs.
By contrast, in companies that successfully execute strategy, 76% limit the number of strategic initiatives they focus on and 64% actually build their budgets around their strategy.
Great executives become organization architects, taking a systemic look at capabilities – processes, governance, culture, competencies, technologies – and build them into the organizational machine expressly designed for a particular strategy.
He knew the only way to successfully execute the bold strategy was to overhaul and align the organizational design.
While some executives thrive on the challenges inherent in the trailblazing work of strategy, many simply collapse under the emotional toll it takes.
The work required to effectively craft and execute a company strategy is extraordinarily difficult.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Give Feedback People Can Actually Use”

Over the last decade, I’ve conducted thousands of 360-degree feedback interviews with the colleagues of the leaders I coach.
How do you give feedback that helps someone learn and improve? This strategic developmental feedback requires careful thought and insightful construction.
Often, the feedback that people give me is based on the giver’s personal leadership beliefs or preferences, and yet the most useful feedback starts with an understanding of what the organization values.
When a feedback giver says “She has a great sense of humor,” what they are usually saying is “Her sense of humor matches mine so I enjoy it.” Strategic developmental feedback is based on the organization’s leadership competency mode, a shared understanding of what effective leadership looks like, or even a comparison of the leader in question with another leader in the organization who is universally thought of as effective.
Useful feedback should focus on what a leader is actually accomplishing.
Too often feedback is described with adjectives that interpret the leader’s behavior: She is self-centered.
Leaders tend to get the most feedback on a specific event – how they communicated in one meeting or responded to one email.
What is more helpful is feedback on patterns of behavior that leverage specific events as examples.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Xi Jinping and China’s New Era of Glory”

For five years, Mr. Xi has led a fierce campaign against corruption, which arguably was the biggest threat to the party’s long-term ability to rule.
Not all of this started with Mr. Xi. China’s military expansion – its two new aircraft carriers, for example – is backed by decades of patient modernization.
The shutting down of social media accounts also began before Mr. Xi took office, as did the creation of “Stability-maintenance” bureaus that have aided the crackdown.
Mr. Xi’s father was one of the founders of the People’s Republic, and Mr. Xi grew up in the privileged world of China’s red nobility.
Like Mr. Xi, for example, other leaders recognized that China’s naked capitalism left many people living unhappily in a spiritual vacuum.
Mr. Xi has embraced traditionalism like no leader since China’s last emperor abdicated in 1912.
Mr. Xi is not a Mao – the comparison has been made but is forced.
The idea of the 64-year-old Mr. Xi retiring quietly in five years seems remote.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Survey of How 1,000 CEOs Spend Their Day Reveals What Makes Leaders Successful”

What makes a CEO effective? The question has been studied extensively, of course, including in HBR. Yet we still know fairly little about how CEOs behave day-to-day and how their behavior relates to the success or failure of the companies they run.
In new research, we use survey data from over 1,000 CEOs across six countries and the financial performance of their companies to explore these questions.
Our evidence suggests that hands-on managerial CEOs are, on average, less effective than leaders who stay more high-level.
About one-third of the time CEOs spend with others is one-on-one; two-thirds is with more than one other person.
CEOs vary considerably on each of these, and our model divides CEO behavior into the two groups mentioned above – leaders and managers – and then scores each CEO as being degrees of each.
Plenty of manager CEOs in our data set do run successful firms.
Because the market for CEOs is far from perfect, sometimes managers – who are more abundant in our sample than leaders – end up in a leader role, and thus negatively affect the performance of the firm they run.
In support of this hypothesis, we saw that places with less-effective labor markets for CEOs were typically associated with a greater disparity in the performance of firms run by managers, relative to firms run by leaders.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Research: How the Best School Leaders Create Enduring Change”

As a school leader sets off on this journey, how do they know what to do, when to do it, who to listen to, and how to manage critics along the way?
While other leaders managed to create a school that looked good while they were there, but then went backwards, these 62 leaders built a school that continued to improve long after they’d left.
As one Architect said, “No one trusts you at the beginning. They’ve been let down too many times by too many people. That’s why I moved to the local area – to show I was committed to the school, the community and to making it work. I wasn’t going to walk away halfway through, like the other Heads before me.” In our study, it took at least five years to engage a school’s community, change its culture and improve its teaching.
In our study, the most successful leaders suspended 10-15% students in the first three years after they arrived, but expelled less than 3%. As one Architect told us, “If you start kicking kids out as soon as you arrive, then your community wonders if you’re trying to help or get rid of them. Instead of expelling students and passing the problem to someone else, we created multiple pathways inside our school – so we could manage and improve behavior ourselves.”
Building block 4-Challenge the staff: change 30-50%. Now it’s time to start changing how the school works.
As another Architect told us, “The culture in the school suddenly tipped when we had 30% new staff, people who were serious about trying to transform the school and the community it serves.”
School leaders are often under huge pressure to turn the school around quickly, but sustainable transformation takes time.
Eighty percent of the best leaders stayed at the school for more than five years – but not all of them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Research Shows That Organizations Benefit When Employees Take Sabbaticals”

There’s an upward trend in employers offering their people more long-term vacations and sabbaticals, and the evidence suggests that everyone benefits.
While sabbaticals are still rare inside of corporate America, their presence is increasing rapidly.
According to a survey from the Society for Human Resource Management, the percentage of companies offering sabbaticals rose to nearly 17% of employers in 2017.
While the type, length, and other sabbatical details vary, research suggests that the upward trend in sabbaticals is due to two primary factors.
Sabbaticals and extended vacation time are not just good for employees to rest and recharge – they benefit the organization by stress-testing the organizational chart and providing interim roles to allow aspiring employees to take on more leadership.
Since the concept of sabbaticals is most popular in the academic arena, the majority of research done on their effect on employees has been conducted by studying professors.
It’s not surprising that the researchers found that those who took sabbaticals experienced, upon return, a decline in stress and an increase in psychological resources and overall well-being.
In one study, researchers surveyed 61 leaders at five different nonprofit organizations with sabbatical programs.

The orginal article.