Summary of “Why More Knowledge Won’t Make You More Successful”

In today’s startup climate, it’s tempting to think that learning more will strengthen your competitive advantage.
Because what matters is not how much you learn, but the ability to home in and apply what you learn strategically.
According to Bloom’s Taxonomy, a hierarchy of learning objectives used by K-12 teachers and college instructors, the highest level of learning happens when we create – generating, planning and producing original material or ideas – using new knowledge.
That’s probably why the world’s most successful entrepreneurs intersperse knowledge acquisition with creative experimentation – to immediately put their learning to use.
With a beginner’s mind, you not only identify blind spots in your knowledge, you learn to approach new areas with humility and curiosity.
We learned to eat, to crawl, to walk and to talk because of an innate interest.
By returning to the pursuit of those things that genuinely interest us, we can learn more effectively.
When it comes to learning, sometimes less is more – because less quantity can mean more quality and increased efficacy as a leader.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Power of Imperfect Starts”

What is optimal for them right now isn’t necessarily needed for you to get started.
If you set your bar at “Amazing,” it’s awfully difficult to start.
Comparing your current situation to someone who is already successful can often make you feel like you lack the required resources to get started at all.
You don’t need new cooking bowls to start eating healthy.
You don’t need a new backpack to start traveling.
You can point out how your business mentor is successful because they use XYZ software, but they probably got started without it.
Don’t let visions of what is optimal prevent you from getting started in the first place.
An imperfect start can always be improved, but obsessing over a perfect plan will never take you anywhere on its own.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Teach Your Brain Something It Won’t Forget a Week Later”

Well, because that’s not how your brain likes to absorb information.
As brain scientists have dug into how learning really works, they’ve discovered that massed practice only leads to remembering things over the short term.
Letting Your Brain Do the Work for You The “Spacing effect” is one of the most consistently replicated mental processes in psychological history, dating back to Hermann Ebbinghaus, who observed it in 1885.
With a little more planning and foresight, you can tap into that cognitive phenomenon to take better advantage of how your brain actually works.
“We measure experiment participants’ brain activity while they’re learning, trying to take in the information, and then ask them to rest,” Davachi says of her research.
“We see there is a footprint of what was happening during the learning; the brain continues to rehearse the prior information.” Davachi has found that participants whose brains show more replay during that rest period do better on recall tests later.
“Your brain is doing your work for you while you’re doing other tasks,” she adds.
The good news is that your brain is already built to acquire and store information that way, just as long you space out the learning process from the outset.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Biggest Wastes Of Time We Regret When We Get Older”

When I look back, my biggest time regrets aren’t spending too much time on Twitter or mismanaging my daily tasks.
Not only did I look like an arse, I could’ve also saved a fair amount of time that day by simply asking my boss what he meant.
Like a lot of people, I made some common bad decisions that wasted both my time and the time of the person I was with.
Every time the thought comes back, simply remind yourself that you have already been forgiven, so there’s no reason to feel bad anymore.
It’s easy to waste time worrying about other people, too.
Don’t get me wrong – your friends and loved ones mean a lot to you, and you want to spend time nurturing them.
Regret is another big waste of time, so there’s no point in beating yourself up over these.
The sooner you learn from them the sooner you can free up your time and energy to live the life you want.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Take Control of Your Learning at Work”

Instead of genuinely promoting a learning culture, most employers obsess over results, demanding higher and higher levels of efficiency and performance, which can be the biggest barrier to curiosity and learning.
To create a learning culture, organizations must value psychological safety, diversity, openness to ideas, and reflection time, all of which can hinder short-term results.
One of the biggest barriers to learning is time, particularly when you are focused on delivering top levels of performance.
If you are waiting to be told what to learn, you are not being proactive about your learning.
Too often we equate learning with formal training or education, but some of the biggest learning opportunities are organic or spontaneous, and this is also true at work.
Whereas formal learning interventions tend to boost only the acquisition of specific content or subject matter expertise, spontaneous and social types of learning are more likely to result in the formation of new habits and practical behaviors.
If you have limited opportunities to learn from others, you can always learn something about yourself: how do others perceive you, including your talents and performance? Answering these questions will help you identify gaps, as well as future learning areas.
Regardless of your past achievements and your present level of expertise, your future depends on your ability to keep learning.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Reading Lessons”

Then comes the twist: these are all metaphors for internal activities of the mind, and especially for the discipline of reading Scripture.
What Aldhelm noticed – and I suspect he would have thought of all reading this way, not just of the Bible – was that reading was a bundle of related abilities, each of which needed precise training.
We had been reading other Romantic poets in the course; next to Byron and Shelley and Keats, Wordsworth was dry as dust.
Kickstart your weekend reading by getting the week’s best Longreads delivered to your inbox every Friday afternoon.
My crash course in reading dramatic texts made me, ironically, a terrible student for an entire semester.
My reading lessons could be purely cognitive, curiously embodied, or startlingly emotional.
These were perhaps the most literal reading lessons I received in undergrad. When I took Toronto’s year-long course in Old English, I had not started a new language in any kind of serious way for over a decade.
Most of my reading lessons ended with my undergraduate education.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Tips for How to Read Faster”

If you want to read faster while maintaining reading comprehension, check out these seven tips.1.
If your goal is more limited in scope than the author’s, plan to only find and read the pertinent sections.
Vary your plan of attack based on the type of material you’re about to read. If you’re going to read a dense legal or scientific text, you should probably plan to read certain passages more slowly and carefully than you’d read a novel or magazine.
Many readers read a few sentences passively, without focus, then spend time going back and re-reading to make sure they understand them.
According to Dartmouth College’s Academic Skills Center, it’s an old-fashioned myth that students must read every section of a textbook or article.
Reading selectively will make it possible for you to digest the main points of many texts, rather than only having time to fully read a couple.
Your job shouldn’t end when you read the last word on the page.
If you want to improve your reading speed, use a timer to test how many words per minute you can read. As you’re able to read faster and faster, check in with yourself to make sure you’re happy with your level of comprehension.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Little-Known Hack to Learn a New Skill in a Fraction of the Time”

Deliberate practice refers to the intensely focused practice of a skill, habit, or ability.
To practice deliberately, you have to break down skills into blocks of discrete micro-skills, map out the order in which you need to learn those micro-skills, and closely monitor your progress.
With deliberate practice, your learning can become magnitudes more efficient.
You can master new skills in a fraction of the time that it would otherwise take.
Not everyone can afford to spend 10,000 hours learning a new skill.
For some skills, it can be easy to find proven curricula to guide your deliberate practice.
If you practice it every day for three or four days a week, you’ll find that you can acquire new skills with incredible rapidity.
These are the five elements that transform “Practice” into “Deliberate practice.” Good luck using them to speed up your development of your staff.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Learning Is a Learned Behavior. Here’s How to Get Better at It.”

Here’s one example of a study that shows how learning strategies can be more important than raw smarts when it comes to gaining expertise.
Marcel Veenman has found that people who closely track their thinking will outscore others who have sky-high IQ levels when it comes to learning something new.
Here are three practical ways to build your learning skills, based on research.
Think About Thinking Metacognition is crucial to the talent of learning.
Reflect on Your Learning There is something of a contradiction in learning.
It turns out that we need to let go of our learning in order to understand our learning.
The good news from all of this – for individuals and for companies looking to help their employees be their best – is that learning is a learned behavior.
By deliberately organizing your learning goals, thinking about your thinking, and reflecting on your learning at opportune times, you can become a better study, too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Life Is Math-Not Magic”

Some say life is like chess, running a marathon, or playing a video game.
Even though those ideas are fun, they don’t provide a practical strategy to base your life on.
About three years ago, I wasn’t satisfied with my life and career.
After reading a few dozen books, I started noticing patterns across different subjects.
“If you find yourself in a state of continual failure in your personal or business life, you might be blaming it on fate or karma or animal spirits or some other form of magic when the answer is simple math.”
Even people who’ve never read a book but have a lot of life experience will tell you that’s the key to happiness.
How? After years of living, we learn to recognize the patterns by ourselves.
“There’s usually a pattern, but it might be subtle. Don’t stop looking just because you don’t see the pattern in the first seven years.”

The orginal article.