Summary of “Dad rock isn’t just for straight, white, American dads”

It’s the old idea of “Classic rock,” limited to dudes – a label affixed to bands like Led Zeppelin, Bob Dylan, The Beatles, the Grateful Dead. Different dad rock bands are ascribed to different moods.
Some dad rock bands, like Zeppelin or Thin Lizzy, evoke an image of dad standing in the garage, shirt off, beer in hand, speakers blasting as he works on his car.
Other dad rock bands, like the Doobie Brothers or Steely Dan, conjure dad in an armchair, sipping a tumbler of Scotch whiskey.
There are even modern dad rock bands like The National and Bon Iver, the favorites of dads with tattoos who drink craft beer and don’t mind pushing the kids around in the stroller.
You might say dad rock means any rock n’ roll enjoyed by dads aged Boomer to Gen X, with millennials on their way – sprawling parameters encompassing most of mainstream rock music, from the Allman Brothers to Zappa.
Regardless of who fits the criteria, there is one across-the-board commonality: dad rock is typically assumed to be music for straight, white, American dads, despite the observable truth that not all dads are straight, white, or American.
We can build an alternate canon in real time, by decoupling from the long-held assumptions about how a dad looks, and thus how a dad rock band sounds.
To her, dad rock is sound disentangled from expectation, until she asks for further clarification or an anecdote of familial attachment to the music.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Danish Architect Designing the Future”

In 2009, BIG released a manifesto titled Yes Is More, riffing on Mies van der Rohe’s signature aphorism “Less is more.” The book, presented as a graphic novel, documents the firm’s work, including multipeak mountainous complexes in Azerbaijan; the morphing, Hadid-like World Trade Center in Vilnius, Lithuania; and the torqued skyscraper Escher Tower for a Norwegian hotel developer, which weaves three monoliths into one.
In Big Time, a new documentary by the Danish director Kaspar Astrup Schröder, Ingels refers to it as a “Courtscraper,” since the center of the pyramid is left open for a planted courtyard that Ingels likens to a private Central Park.
Like a good start-up, BIG is scalable and self-replicating; the bigger it gets, the more it can grow and the more arenas it can enter.
The perfect merging of BIG’s concerns with those of Silicon Valley might be its designs for the Hyperloop-a hypothetical transportation method that involves carriages speeding through a low-pressure tube.
For Dubai, BIG designed a floating, airportlike Hyperloop station made of warm wood and glass that arcs out in two semicircles with small ports for each car-pod, which band together into cylindrical carriages.
In 2015, BIG’s design replaced Norman Foster’s for 2 World Trade Center, in part at the preference of James Murdoch, whose family’s companies 21st Century Fox and News Corp were going to be the anchor tenants.
These buildings benefit the BIG brand, even when they don’t get built-as long as the viral renderings attract more fans and followers.
You can live in a BIG tower, work in a BIG office, send your kids to a BIG school, tell the time by a BIG watch, sit in a BIG chair, ride a BIG bike, and stream a film about BIG on Netflix.

The orginal article.

Summary of “John Mulaney Is Happy to Be Here”

John Mulaney performed his biggest show to date with a tear in his hip.
Sometime last summer, Mulaney knew something was wrong; soon, an MRI confirmed that he’d sustained a labral tear, just in time to refine his new special, Kid Gorgeous, and then record it at New York’s historic Radio City Music Hall.
“One thing I’ve learned is, there’s not these elephants in the room the same way you think there are,” Mulaney says.
Since Mulaney’s conclusion, Mulaney himself has released The Comeback Kid, his widely acclaimed second hour-long special; had a successful run on Broadway with the stage version of Oh, Hello, the beloved sketch premise developed with longtime collaborator Nick Kroll; and finished a yearlong tour, culminating in the Netflix hour Kid Gorgeous at Radio City, the first installment of a multispecial deal.
Of course, there’s the name Kid Gorgeous, complete with art that depicts Mulaney almost literally cherubic, framed by a halo.
Mulaney’s biggest project in the years between Mulaney and Kid Gorgeous is a testament to pursuing specific passions over consensus next steps, especially if those passions involve diner menus and the bathroom policies at Zabar’s.
Oh, Hello splices Mulaney’s eye for detail with the broad, committed character work that Kroll specializes in, a complementary skill set Mulaney says has cross-pollinated over time.
“A new take would be great. Some sort of silly side road would be great.” Mulaney’s response to that perceived desire is a lengthy diatribe comparing the president to a horse loose in a hospital, Kid Gorgeous’s only direct mention of what Mulaney calls “The current sitch.” The effect isn’t unlike the “Why buy the cow?” bit from The Comeback Kid-an analogy that starts off as clichéd, but snowballs its way to novelty by pushing the hypothetical to its breaking point, then several lines past it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Learning Is a Learned Behavior. Here’s How to Get Better at It.”

That’s why many people tend to approach the topic of learning without much focus.
Here’s one example of a study that shows how learning strategies can be more important than raw smarts when it comes to gaining expertise.
Marcel Veenman has found that people who closely track their thinking will outscore others who have sky-high IQ levels when it comes to learning something new.
Here are three practical ways to build your learning skills, based on research.
Studies consistently show that people with clear goals outperform people with vague aspirations like “Do a good job.” By setting targets, people can manage their feelings more easily and achieve progress with their learning.
It turns out that we need to let go of our learning in order to understand our learning.
The good news from all of this – for individuals and for companies looking to help their employees be their best – is that learning is a learned behavior.
By deliberately organizing your learning goals, thinking about your thinking, and reflecting on your learning at opportune times, you can become a better study, too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Divine Discontent: Disruption’s Antidote – Stratechery by Ben Thompson”

Amazon’s highly modular structure, varied businesses, and iterative approach to those businesses enable it to create services with itself as its first, best, customer, and then extend those services to developers and retailers, even as the exact same factors lead to product disasters like the Fire Phone.
The second element of the failure framework, the observation that technologies can progress faster than market demandmeans that in their efforts to provide better products than their competitors and earn higher prices and margins, suppliers often “Overshoot” their market: They give customers more than they need or ultimately are willing to pay for.
Apple seems to have mostly saturated the high end, slowly adding switchers even as existing iPhone users hold on to their phones longer; what is not happening is what disruption predicts: Apple isn’t losing customers to low-cost competitors for having “Overshot” and overpriced its phones.
We now offer customers gift certificates, 1-Click shopping, and vastly more reviews, content, browsing options, and recommendation features.
Word of mouth remains the most powerful customer acquisition tool we have, and we are grateful for the trust our customers have placed in us.
One thing I love about customers is that they are divinely discontent.
These examples are from retail, but I sense that the same customer empowerment phenomenon is happening broadly across everything we do at Amazon and most other industries as well.
Owning the customer relationship by means of delivering a superior experience is how these companies became dominant, and, when they fall, it will be because consumers deserted them, either because the companies lost control of the user experience, or because a paradigm shift made new experiences matter more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Five things you might be surprised affect weight”

Here are five potentially surprising factors that can affect your weight, as unearthed by The Truth About Obesity.
Scientists at Cambridge University believe 40-70% of the effect on our weight is down to variation in the genes we inherit.
Particular genes can affect a person’s appetite, how much food they want to eat and what type of food they might prefer.
There are at least 100 that can affect weight, including one called MC4R. It is thought about one in every 1,000 people carries a defective version of the MC4R gene, which works in the brain to control hunger and appetite.
Prof Farooqi says: “There’s not really anything you can do about your genes, but for some people, knowing that genes may increase their chances of gaining weight can help them to deal with changes in diet and exercise.”
Obesity expert Dr James Brown says the later we eat, the more likely we are to gain weight.
During the night our bodies struggle to digest fats and sugars so eating the bulk of calories before about 19:00 can help you lose weight or prevent you from gaining it in the first place.
If the drug is proven safe, the plan is to use it until the patients reach a healthy weight.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Intellectual life is still catching up to urbanisation”

Mao’s Cultural Revolution in China pursued a back-to-the-land agenda no less than the Khmer Rouge’s genocidal vision of razing city life altogether in Cambodia.
Some scholars look all the way back to the new systems of political organisation and the peculiar social life generated by the first cities.
The medieval German adage ‘City air makes you free’ expressed a customary law stipulating that one year of life in the city liberated rural serfs.
Simmel found the over-stimulation of city life produced a ‘blasé’ personality type characteristic of the metropolis.
The book’s stress on voluntary clustering due to socioeconomic reasons, rather than enforced separation, still shapes how many Americans think about residential segregation in their cities today.
Of course, city life made many things more solid, petrified, built with concrete.
Much in the life and character of a city depends on when it was born, and by what kind of parents.
In the 20th-century US, inner cities were widely associated with poverty and decay, while moving to the suburbs meant a step up the social ladder.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The cost of changing an entire country’s alphabet”

The government signed off on a new alphabet, based on a Latin script instead of Kazakhstan’s current use of Cyrillic, in October.
In his attempt to get ahead by launching in the new alphabet, Kaipiyev had not predicted that the government would revise it.
There’s also the cost of changing the language of government affairs.
“The government left it blank. I think the logic is that it would not cost anything.”
“But the director of Kazakhstan’s Centre for Macroeconomic Research, Olzhas Khudaibergenov, believes the whole transition will cost far less than Kapparov’s estimate. He thinks all paper documents costs will just be folded into the government’s usual budget.”Real expenses will be only for informational and explanatory programmes to support the transition.
Kapparov says this alphabet transition is “Hard to sell” for the government, and there won’t be a direct return on investment.
Turkey, which switched to a Latin-based alphabet from its former Arabic script in 1928, has managed to form alliances with the European Union and was in negotiations – up until recently, when the government moved towards a more autocratic direction – to be a member.
Fazylzhanova Muratkyzy, a linguist who worked with the government to create the new alphabet, echoes this assessment, and says many Kazakhs associate the Cyrillic-based script to Soviet control.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Story About Manu”

This is a short anecdote about one of my sons, but really it’s about Manu Ginobili, but really it’s about what Manu Ginobili means, and has meant, and can mean.
There are a bunch of Basketball-Reference numbers that I can set into a paragraph or bulleted list right now to help convey the magnitude of Manu Ginobili as an impactful and influential basketball player.
Did you know that Manu has scored more points than any other left-handed player in postseason history? It’s a weird thing, but also a true thing.
Second place is Bill Russell, and he’s nearly 400 points behind Manu.
Here’s a good one: Manu has the best plus-minus per 100 possessions of anyone who’s played at least 20,000 minutes since 2000.
There’s never really been a time when someone was talking about how great Manu is and felt compelled to bring up stats.
So: Me telling my son to shout “Manu!” when he was playing on his little goal is no different from me telling him, “Hey, be like Manu when you play basketball,” and me telling him, “Hey, be like Manu when you play basketball,” is no different from me telling him, “Hey, be like Manu as a person.” It’s the highest, biggest, most intense compliment, and a parent saying it to his or her small child is the highest, biggest, most intense way to give it.
If Manu decides to come back for another season, it’ll be fine.

The orginal article.

Summary of “YouTube Struggles With Plan to Clean Up Mess That Made It Rich”

Prior to the rampage, Aghdam posted hundreds of videos on YouTube, holding forth on subjects such as veganism, bodybuilding, and animal rights.
PewDiePie, a Swedish comedian and top YouTube personality, made an off-color joke about Nazis.
Because YouTube doesn’t look like social media, it’s tougher to recognize how its most horrifying videos spread. In the fall, when Facebook, Twitter, and Google sent lawyers instead of executives to testify before Congress about Russian meddling in the presidential election, Team Google repeatedly stressed that YouTube and its other properties aren’t really social networks and therefore can’t fall prey to the worst of the internet’s trolls, bots, or propagandists.
Over the past year, YouTube has made the most sweeping changes since its early days, removing videos it deemed inappropriate and stripping away the advertising from others.
In interviews at the San Bruno complex, YouTube executives often resorted to a civic metaphor: YouTube is like a small town that’s grown so large, so fast, that its municipal systems-its zoning laws, courts, and sanitation crews, if you will-have failed to keep pace.
Suddenly, YouTube needed a better system to help viewers navigate the deluge, something that would keep them from feeling overwhelmed and wandering back to the comfort of their TVs. In 2010, YouTube hired French programmer Guillaume Chaslot, who soon began developing algorithms that could better match viewers with videos that would keep them watching.
More and more, YouTube was starting to convince advertisers it had become the new TV. Kyncl said as much onstage at Madison Square Garden in 2015 during the company’s annual “Brandcast,” at which executives showcase new YouTube programming in front of the world’s top advertisers.
“When the nature of the content is that sensitive, and the video is trending, you expect YouTube to be more on top of their game,” says Aditi Rajvanshi, a former YouTube employee who now consults for YouTube stars.

The orginal article.