Summary of “A feminist’s guide to raising boys”

In the 1970s, from my child’s-eye point of view, it seemed pretty much agreed that boys and girls were essentially the same; it was just society that turned us into “Boys” and “Girls”.
No matter how much Mike pitched in, the day-to-day reality was me, at home, trying to hold back a tsunami of washing-up and laundry and mess and boys and nappies and Lego.
Looking back, there were a lot of things I should have talked more about to the boys.
At one meal, when I tried to explain to a table of men and boys why #MeToo was a necessary act of mass civil disobedience, how the ideal of a rule of law actually shielded white men and protected the status quo, how most women who are assaulted never get justice, it all fell apart.
The producers dressed little boys up in girls’ clothes and vice versa, then got unsuspecting members of the public to play with them and watched as they merrily handed robots and maths toys to the little “Boy” and cuddly toys and dolls to the “Girl”.
Why did I find this so hard to write? Because it involved admitting that I was naive, that I didn’t put nearly as much thought into the business of rearing good feminist boys as it deserved.
Hug your boys a lot and tell them, often, how much you love them.
Teach your sons that equality is just as good for boys as it is for girls.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How meal timings affect your waistline”

Mounting evidence suggests that timing is also important: it’s not just what you eat, but when you eat that matters.
Ancient Chinese medics believed that energy flowed around the body in parallel with the sun’s movements, and that our meals should be timed accordingly: 7-9am was the time of the stomach, when the biggest meal of the day should be consumed; 9-11am centred on the pancreas and spleen; 11am-1pm was the time of the heart, and so on.
Most weight-loss schemes revolve around reducing the overall number of calories consumed – but what if the timing also determined the benefits? When overweight and obese women were put on a weight-loss diet for three months, those who consumed most of their calories at breakfast lost two and a half times more weight than those who had a light breakfast and ate most of their calories at dinner – even though they consumed the same number of calories overall.
What else could be going on? Some preliminary evidence suggests that more energy is used to process a meal when it’s eaten in the morning, compared with later in the day, so you burn slightly more calories if you eat earlier.
His own research has revealed that the majority of North Americans eat over the course of 15 or more hours each day, with more than a third of the day’s calories consumed after 6pm, which is very different to how our ancestors must have lived.
It’s not only consistency in the timing of meals, but in the amount of food we eat at each meal that seems to be important.
What should we do about it? Striving for greater consistency in the timing of our sleep and meals is a good first step, and ideally, all our clocks should be operating on the same time zone.
Dimming the lights in the evenings and getting more exposure to bright light during the day time has been shown to shift the timing of the master clock in the brain several hours earlier, making people more lark-like.

The orginal article.

Summary of “John Bolton: Trump’s Shrewd National Security Adviser”

With a president not only prone to bold gestures but incapable of any other kind, Bolton’s role as national security adviser is becoming one for which no one ever thought him suited: a moderating influence.
Bolton is Trump’s third national security adviser.
In October, Trump called Bolton “Mike” at a press conference, perhaps confusing him with the golden-maned singer-songwriter Michael Bolton.
Notice a familiar rhythm: Trump says something, Bolton says he agrees, then Bolton reinterprets Trump to mean the opposite of what he said and pushes to implement his reinterpretation, presumably with Trump’s blessing.
Bolton sometimes sounds less like a national security adviser than a lawyer clawing back the utterances of an uncontrollable client.
Bolton urged me to look at Trump’s “Actual record and formal statements.” “What Trump said was ‘Are we a collective defense organization or are we not?’ Collective means collective,” Bolton said, pointing out that NATO members had started spending more on their militaries.
“I am the national security adviser-not the national security decider,” Bolton told me on three separate occasions.
Bolton may have mind-melded with Trump better than McMaster did, but inevitably the president and his national security adviser will disagree, both on style and on substance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Barbie Is the Most Popular Doll in America-She’s Also the Most Controversial, Diverse, and Ambitious”

Like more than 90 percent of American women, I grew up with Barbies.
I also had a Barbie Dreamhouse-even in 2019, 30 are sold per hour-and a pink convertible that Ken “Fell” out of when Barbie floored it.
I can’t remember “The first” Barbie or even the one I liked best.
Somehow the collection just expanded, with new Barbies added to the group to make the others jealous like proto-contestants on Bachelor in Paradise.
The standard Barbie is 11 and 1/2 inches tall, but her reach is enormous.
Last month it announced it’ll add to the collection: Barbie in a wheelchair; one with a prosthetic limb; some with a new, braided hair texture; and an entire fourth shape, with a smaller bust, less defined waist, and more defined arms.
Barbie made her first appearance at the New York Toy Fair that March.
Or as she put it: “Knowing how to cook and keeping a good house? Oh shit, it was awful.” For all Barbie’s foibles-and the Sleepover Barbie released in 1965 that came with a scale set to 110 pounds and a diet book plastered with the words “Don’t Eat!” is but one example-it’s no surprise that when Handler created Barbie, she made her an independent woman and a wage earner.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Research: Better-Managed Companies Pay Employees More Equally”

Companies that implement more structured management practices pay their employees more equally.
We refer to practices that are more explicit, formal, frequent, or specific as “More structured practices.” From the MOPS and related data, researchers have demonstrated just how important the use of these structured management practices is for companies and even entire economies, since firms that implement more of these practices tend to perform better.
We found that companies that reported more structured management practices according to the MOPS paid their employees more equally, as measured by the difference between pay for workers at the 90th and 10th percentiles within each firm.
Previous research shows that firms with more structured management practices are more profitable on average, and there’s long been evidence that when companies make extra profits they share some of them with workers.
Perhaps companies with more structured practices allocate these profits such that less well-paid workers get more of the pie.
Maybe firms with more structured practices have more efficient low-paid workers, as a response to training or monitoring practices, and their pay reflects that extra efficiency.
Finally, it could be that firms with more structured practices are more focused on specific tasks and rely more on outsourcing.
More and more companies are outsourcing tasks like cleaning, catering, security, and transport.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Disagree with Someone More Powerful than You”

What do you say when you disagree with someone who has more power than you do? How do you decide whether it’s worth speaking up? And if you do, what exactly should you say?
Here’s how to disagree with someone more powerful than you.
Maybe “You haven’t finished thinking the problem through, the whole discussion was a surprise to you, or you want to get a clearer sense of what the group thinks,” says Weeks.
“If you think other people are going to disagree too, you might want to gather your army first. People can contribute experience or information to your thinking – all the things that would make the disagreement stronger or more valid.” It’s also a good idea to delay the conversation if you’re in a meeting or other public space.
Identify a shared goal Before you share your thoughts, think about what the powerful person cares about – it may be “The credibility of their team or getting a project done on time,” says Grenny.
Ask permission to disagree This step may sound overly deferential according to Grenny, it’s a smart way to give the powerful person “Psychological safety” and control.
“When you disagree with someone more powerful than you, you should always have a constructive reason to oppose. In my case, the reason was timing,” Victor says.
Case Study #2: Make it about the company, not you Mike McRitchie, owner of the consultancy Critical Path Action, has had reason to disagree with people more powerful than he on several occasions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Problem With Nostalgia”

One familiar nostalgia exercise happens when people – whether they were alive back then or not – lazily compare the best of the past with the worst of the present.
New York City in the late 1970s is largely remembered as a time when the legendary disco Studio 54 attracted a glamorous crowd who danced and partied with abandon.
The era of dazzling club “Celebutantes” was also a time of yuppies, gentrification, ’round the clock networking, and Madonna’s relentless, take-no-prisoners drive to make it big – an act of tunnel vision I witnessed up close.
The big-haired era brought some deafeningly bombing movies and possibly the four worst sitcoms of all time: Punky Brewster, Small Wonder, ALF, and She’s The Sheriff In music, Phil Collins’ droning “Sussudio” was a low point, along with Bobby McFerrin’s chirpy “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” and the fraudulent schlock of Milli Vanilli, the pop duo who were as dubbed as Lina Lamont in Singin’ in the Rain.
Today, the people who complain that New York has lost its edge generally either live in high-rise co-ops or moved to far-away cities where you get a terrace and a garage.
The old edge wasn’t all fabulous and the new edge isn’t all gone, but it’s easier for some to reduce all that to a nostalgic yelp of “I love the ’80s!”. * * *. Nineties nostalgia is all the rage right now, with sitcom reboots, musicals based on movies from Pretty Woman to Clueless, and various small-screen crime reenactments.
It’ll be time for the inevitable aughts revival – followed, of course, by the teens – when we’ll have parades in the street to commemorate the rise of important cultural icon Paris Hilton, as well as the emergence of the scintillating Kardashian clan, when in actuality they steal whatever brain cells are left in us after mind-crushing days spent reading Facebook posts about Adam Levine’s tattoos and Roseanne’s meltdowns.
Michael Musto is a weekly columnist for NewNowNext.com and a freelance writer for outlets from the New York Times Styles section to the Daily Beast.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Recycling Is Broken”

The recycling industry-which operates with next to no federal guidance despite processing a quarter of America’s waste-is in an existential struggle to chart a new path forward for itself.
Most of us think of recycling as a service our city provides, but in reality it’s a business.
The effect on the U.S. recycling business was, as one industry expert put it, like an “Earthquake.” Mixed paper and plastic exports to China plunged more than 90 percent between January 2017 and January 2018, according to data compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. International Trade Commission.
Anne Germain, Vice President of Technical and Regulatory Affairs at the National Waste and Recycling Association, an industry trade group, told me that mixed paper went from selling for about $100 a ton to a high of about $3 a ton.
Ultimately, the effects have rippled back to the cities which, faced with soaring costs to keep recycling afloat, have been forced to make hard choices, whether that’s sending recyclables to a landfill or paring down the list of items they’ll accept.
McGrath said if Philly can convince residents to stop tossing plastic bags in the recycling bin, that alone would be a big deal.
Germain said public education was something the recycling industry as a whole had let slide over the years.
While a better educated public would translate to a cleaner, more profitable recycling stream, there’s also a desperate need for new manufacturers to fill the China-shaped void.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Watertown, New York, Tops a Scale of Political Tolerance”

WATERTOWN, N.Y.-Watertown, in a remote stretch of upstate New York known as the North Country, is an unforgiving place.
Like most people I asked, including half a dozen local politicians, several Watertown reporters, a soldier, and multiple bartenders, Garry correctly guessed that the county performed well in a ranking of political comity.
In October, Garry wrote an op-ed for the Watertown Daily Times calling out Trump’s lack of shame.
The Watertown city council has been nonpartisan for the past century-ever since the town’s residents wisely voted to kick the political parties out of their local affairs.
The politics reporter at the Watertown Daily Times is a young man named Abraham Kenmore.
On one level, this story shows that political tolerance has its limits, even in Watertown, and rightly so.
On one of my visits to Watertown, I went for a run in Thompson Park, which includes a zoo that proudly features only animals indigenous to New York State.
Watertown has ways of helping people set aside false confidence, but other communities do too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Beyoncé’s Publicist”

Noel-Schure still cares about whether the stringer from the local Ohio paper makes it through the doors of that stadium, and her work is a reminder that stars like Beyoncé’s larger-than-life status is, in part, a summation of meticulously tended to details.
Without the support of a major label, Noel-Schure had to quickly learn how to bring in clients and give them 360-degree support, but she had a vote of confidence from Beyoncé and Prince, who kept their business with her after she left Sony.Today, Noel-Schure represents a host of veterans like LeAnn Rimes, as well as shining newcomers like Chloe x Halle and Ingrid.
At first, Noel-Schure struggled to pitch Destiny’s Child, a fact that rankled Matthew Knowles, Beyoncé’s father and longtime manager.
At the time, it was rare for a major-label pop group to write their own songs, and Noel-Schure knew that Beyoncé’s budding talent as a songwriter would help distinguish Destiny’s Child.
” For Noel-Schure and her biggest client, something like Beyoncé’s 2018 Coachella performance is a powerful rebuttal to the criticism: A profound, emotionally excavating body of work that stands for itself.
Noel-Schure had traveled to her beloved Grenada for a friend’s wedding, but had a few pressing work concerns to juggle.
Beyoncé’s paradigm-shifting visual album, “Lemonade,” was due to be surprise released on HBO in less than a week, and Noel-Schure was on guard in case the news leaked.
Noel-Schure practices what Beyoncé preaches-commitment to family and personal enrichment in addition to a devotion to her work.

The orginal article.