Summary of “Gossiping Is Good”

A team of Dutch researchers reported that hearing gossip about others made research subjects more reflective; positive gossip inspired self-improvement efforts, and negative gossip made people prouder of themselves.
In another study, the worse participants felt upon hearing a piece of negative gossip, the more likely they were to say they had learned a lesson from it.
Negative gossip can also have a prosocial effect on those who are gossiped about.
By far the most positive assessment of gossip comes courtesy of the anthropologist and evolutionary psychologist Robin Dunbar.
Once upon a time, in Dunbar’s account, our primate ancestors bonded through grooming, their mutual back-scratching ensuring mutual self-defense in the event of attack by predators.
As hominids grew more intelligent and more social, their groups became too large to unite by grooming alone.
That’s where language-and gossip, broadly defined-stepped in.
This article appears in the July/August 2018 print edition with the headline “Gossip Is Good.”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is there any truth to anti-aging schemes?”

“We were promoting all kinds of ways to slow aging that nowadays are recognized but hadn’t made it into the mainstream yet,” Faloon says.
Barzilai is director of the Institute for Aging Research at New York’s Albert ­Einstein College of Medicine, the lead sponsor of the five-year TAME trial that will soon enroll 3,000 ­participants between ages 65 and 80.
The Cell paper highlighted other ways to disrupt the aging process.
Hariri is a co-founder of Human Longevity Inc., a ­Silicon Valley venture using supercomputers to search for genes related to human aging.
A team at the Mayo Clinic’s Kogod Center on Aging recently managed to destroy senescent cells in mice using a new class of medications called senolytic agents.
Most recently, Faloon underwent a series of infusions of NAD+ molecules, which David Sinclair, co-director of the Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging at Harvard Medical School, has called “The closest we’ve gotten to a fountain of youth.” The molecules help regulate cellular aging but diminish over time.
“People look at aging as something that is very simple,” says Michael Fossel, a former professor of the biology of aging at Grand Valley State University in Michigan.
Aging research can’t promise them-or Bill ­Faloon-​anything.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do We Care So Much About Privacy?”

“The Right to Privacy” is where Sarah Igo begins “The Known Citizen”, her mighty effort to tell the story of modern America as a story of anxieties about privacy.
As in Douglas’s dissent, privacy functions as a kind of default right when an injury has been inflicted and no other right seems to suit the case.
Douglas got a second crack at applying his theory of privacy as a constitutional right in 1965, in the case of Griswold v. Connecticut.
“Specific guarantees in the Bill of Rights,” Douglas wrote for the Court, “Have penumbras, formed by emanations from those guarantees that help give them life and substance.” The right to privacy was formed out of such emanations.
People invoke their right to privacy when it serves their interests.
How far the constitutional right to privacy can be made to stretch is the subject of Cyrus Farivar’s lively history of recent Fourth Amendment jurisprudence, “Habeas Data: Privacy vs. the Rise of Surveillance Tech”.
The right to privacy does not attach to property, the Court now said; it attaches to persons.
The Supreme Court found that the use of the device violated Jones’s right to privacy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This One Simple Thing Is Absolutely Necessary To Be An Expert”

If your process is unique enough, you can build your brand around it and it can become part of your brand’s offerings-you can actually leverage it as a distinct selling point.
In its purest form, process is “The way you work.” Most people have some kind of process, whether they mean to or not, and if you’ve been in business for any length of time, you’ve probably formed some habits that you repeatfor better or worse.
Branding and selling your known-and-proven process has tons of benefits and is one of the necessary parts of being seen as an expert: It instills trust in clients that they will get the promised results, it makes it easier to sell your services as both you and the client know exactly what to expect, it gives you the ability to confidently, simply, and succinctly explain your services to prospects, and once your clients sign on the dotted line, your job becomes much easier because you have clear steps to follow that you are confident you can execute because you have the experience.
Our Brandup process is not a gimmick or even about speed, it’s an expression of our no-nonsense approach to creating brands and trimming all the fat and waste so that all you are left with is what you actually needed in the first place: a BA brand that is effective in getting you noticed, remembered and shared.
Laura kept getting stuck on trying to articulate and define her brand; but, despite not knowing what her brand was she did have a process.
In her case, getting aspiring writers all the way from start all the way to the finish line in a manageable time frame! She can now use her process as a foundation for her brand and message.
Your proven process can be that special, stand out thing.
If those aren’t enough of a reason to develop your branded process, consider this: once you have a proven, branded process, you you can eventually parlay that process into a more scalable model by selling the process itself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You should be sleeping more than eight hours a night. Here’s why”

Why 8.5 hours of sleep is the new eight hours.
A professor I collaborate with at Penn State named Orfeu Buxton says that 8.5 hours of sleep is the new eight hours.
In order to get a healthy eight hours of sleep, which is the amount that many people need, you need to be in bed for 8.5 hours.
The standard in the literature is that healthy sleepers spend more than 90% of the time in bed asleep, so if you’re in bed for eight hours, a healthy sleeper might actually sleep for only about 7.2 hours.
8.5 hours of sleep is the new eight hours.
For optimum productivity, we need around eight hours of sleep, right? But that doesn’t have to be in one go.
Gallup has reported that over the past 50 years, we’re sleeping a whole hour less per night than we did in the 1950s.
There is certainly a false myth that we need eight hours of continuous sleep: I think it’s possible to have your sleep be a little bit broken up and be perfectly healthy-but getting that eight hours is crucially important.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Critic Whose Olive Garden Review Went Viral Remembers How Anthony Bourdain Spoke Up For Her”

Bourdain defended Hagerty, celebrating her “Triumph over the snarkologists” when the review went viral.
As a result of her online fame, Hagerty wound up flying to New York to do the media rounds, including a hot dog review for the New York Times.
While there, she and Bourdain met for coffee – and she wound up getting a book deal because of it.
In the foreword, Bourdain praised Hagerty as a hard-working, quick-witted food writer with deep knowledge of her community.
“Anthony Bourdain spoke up for me at a time when people all over the country were making great fun of the column I write,” Hagerty told BuzzFeed News.
Bourdain had also laughed when he first read the review, but dropped the snark when he realized how her columns represented her community, she said.
Their coffee meeting in New York was the only time they ever met, and Hagerty said she still thinks about it fondly.
“And one of the wonderful things that happened to me was when Anthony Bourdain spoke up for me and wanted to publish my columns in a book.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mo Salah Is Ready to Make the Whole World Smile”

In Liverpool, the fans follow Mohamed Salah when he bows in prayer.
“I don’t know why it happens or why it is happening, but it is something I think about.” I ask Salah about the way Egypt is changing because of him-how he has given young people a sports star to aspire to become-and he pauses.
“We’ll fight for the first. It’s a fighting mentality.”-Mo Salah to B/R Football, on returning from injury for Egypt’s first World Cup matchSalah is humble by nature, though he exudes a natural confidence that you might expect comes with the territory of being one of the greatest athletes in the world.
Still, Salah is thrilled and often surprised by the enthusiasm of the people who adore him.
A statement from the Egyptian national team, that its doctors expected Salah to recover in time for the country’s second match of the World Cup group stage, brought relief to millions.
A phone call with B/R may do more than that: “We’ll fight for the first,” Salah says.
Salah is aware of his celebrity throughout the world and is bold enough to want to push it further.
“I saw some YouTube of him-not just basketball, but when he’s talking-and I like him.” Salah insists that he wants to be the biggest player in the world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Anthony Bourdain, Kate Spade, and the Preventable Tragedies of Suicide”

Who knows if Bourdain had read of Kate Spade’s suicide as he prepared to do the same thing? We are all statistically more likely to kill ourselves than we were ten years ago.
If life wasn’t worth living for people such as Bourdain and Spade, how can our more ordinary lives hold up? Those of us who have clinical depression can feel the tug toward suicide amped up by this kind of news.
There has long been an assertion popular in mental-health circles that suicide is a symptom of depression and that, if we would only treat depression adequately, suicide would be a thing largely of the past.
We learn of Kate Spade’s possible marital woes as though marital woes rationalized a suicide.
For someone without a mental disorder or illness, would suicide seem like the permanent answer to temporary woes? Suicide is a result of despair, hopelessness, the feeling of being a burden on others.
The proximity of a means to suicide swells suicide numbers; when you reduce access to means of suicide, you reduce suicide.
Dr. Kelly Posner, who helped develop the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale, pointed out that more policemen die of suicide than die on the job; more soldiers die of suicide than die in combat; more firefighters die of suicide than die in fires.
Dr. Jeffrey Borenstein, the C.E.O. of the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, has said, “If you are concerned about a loved one, you should express your concern. Some people have the misconception that asking a person about suicide will increase the risk, but in reality asking does not increase the risk of suicide, but can save a life.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Scammers: They’re Just Like Us”

The most compelling moral of the Delvey story might be that once people believe you’re a specific type of useless-but-loaded socialite, actual riches will follow – you’re welcomed into a weird kind of anything-goes world that is virtually invisible to the rest of us.
“Scammers show us the glitzy bullshit intrinsic to stratospheric wealth in America,” Jia Tolentino wrote today, and while Anna Delvey may not be the person we want our children to become, at least she got a free ride on a private jet.
If there’s something fun about Delvey, it’s that her victims were mostly the kind of people who can afford to take the occasional financial hit – and some of them probably deserved to.
Wreaking havoc on people’s health care puts her well into bad scam territory.
Billy McFarland, organizer of the Fyre Festival? His victims were mostly the kind of people who think something like the Fyre Festival is cool, and the week that the entire internet spent celebrating their misfortune was his gift to us all.
One you convince about 80,000 people that you’re the lifestyle icon you claim to be, companies will start sending you clothes, money, jewelry, and invites to fancy parties.
While we may have some level of grudging respect for people who manage to get free stuff just by pouting in front of murals, the truly special ones put in the effort and take it to the next level.
It’s hard to know exactly which side most of us are on: Who among us hasn’t learned to fine-tune our accents or behave a grade or two above where we might have come from? Who hasn’t developed a finely edited life story that matches where we want to be? He just took it a few steps further, and reaped the rewards without really hurting anyone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Web Searches Reveal What We’re Really Thinking”

What are the weirdest questions you’ve ever Googled? Mine might be: “How many people have ever lived?” “What do people think about just before death?” and “How many bits would it take to resurrect in a virtual reality everyone who ever lived?” Using Google’s autocomplete and Keyword Planner tools, U.K.-based Internet company Digitaloft generated a list of what it considers 20 of the craziest searches, including “Am I pregnant?” “Are aliens real?” “Why do men have nipples?” “Is the world flat?” and “Can a man get pregnant?”.
This is all very entertaining, but according to economist Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, who worked at Google as a data scientist, such searches may act as a “Digital truth serum” for deeper and darker thoughts.
As he explains in his book Everybody Lies, “In the pre-digital age, people hid their embarrassing thoughts from other people. In the digital age, they still hide them from other people, but not from the internet and in particular sites such as Google and PornHub, which protect their anonymity.” Employing big data research tools “Allows us to finally see what people really want and really do, not what they say they want and say they do.”
People may tell pollsters that they are not racist, for example, and polling data do indicate that bigoted attitudes have been in steady decline for decades on such issues as interracial marriage, women’s rights and gay marriage, indicating that conservatives today are more socially liberal than liberals were in the 1950s.
Using the Google Trends tool in analyzing the 2008 U.S. presidential election Stephens-Davidowitz concluded that Barack Obama received fewer votes than expected in Democrat strongholds because of still latent racism.
This difference between public polls and private thoughts, Stephens-Davidowitz observes, helps to explain Obama’s underperformance in regions with a lot of racist searches and partially illuminates the surprise election of Donald Trump.
More optimistically, these declines in prejudice may be an underestimate, given that when Google began keeping records of searches in 2004 most Googlers were urban and young, who are known to be less prejudiced and bigoted than rural and older people, who adopted the search technology years later.
As members of the Silent Generation and Baby Boomers are displaced by Gen Xers and Millennials, and as populations continue shifting from rural to urban living, and as postsecondary education levels keep climbing, such prejudices should be on the wane.

The orginal article.