Summary of “Exclusive: Inside Twitter’s secret plan to kill “dunking””

So a year ago, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey announced plans for a somewhat idealistic solution, not just for minimizing Twitter dunks but also for minimizing all kinds of angry, vile, and abusive user behaviors that don’t necessarily violate its rules: He wants to invent a new metric that measures Twitter’s health, and then optimize for it.
It’s a nice idea, though measuring Twitter’s health is taking much longer than expected, according to exclusive interviews with both Twitter employees and company partners.
Twitter is sick The idea to measure Twitter’s health was planted in Jack Dorsey’s ear by Deb Roy, an MIT researcher and one-time Twitter employee.
12 months after Dorsey first tweeted out the plan – and roughly eight months since Twitter introduced those academic partners – Twitter hasn’t unveiled or implemented any new metrics.
Lawyers for Twitter and Leiden haven’t been able to solidify the data-sharing and privacy details for the partnership, which means the researchers are simply waiting, according to interviews with Twitter and the company’s partners.
A Twitter spokesperson says the humans reviewing and rating these conversations are paid, and make up a “diverse group of people who use Twitter at least once a month.
Twitter executives like to use the word “incentives” – as in, how can Twitter incentivize people to behave a certain way?
Then there are social rewards such as “Likes” and retweets – i.e. incentives for dunking – that Twitter is also thinking about.

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Summary of “The Best Ways to Use Social Media to Expand Your Network”

Too many people focus on trying to network with senior people.
People earlier in their careers respond most often to an initial message, while VPs and C-level professionals respond the least to people they don’t already know.
People don’t have the patience to read long messages that look and feel spammy, especially if it’s the first time they’re hearing from you.
If you’re in a transitional period – starting at a new company, switching industries, or moving to a new city – recognize the opportunity to reach out to people, ask for their advice, and absorb their wisdom.
You don’t have to offer to help in every circumstance, but make yourself available as a resource to people, particularly to people who are just starting out in their careers.
As you build your online network, don’t neglect the people you already know.
Social media opens up incredible possibilities for strengthening your professional network.
Make sure you approach online networking as an extension of how you interact with others in the real world: connect with people personally by finding common ground, then build trust and long-term relationships, rather than one-time transactions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Two Things to Do After Every Meeting”

Steve Jobs insisted that every item on a meeting agenda have a designated person responsible for that task and any follow-up work that happened.
Attendees are often immediately running to another meeting where their attention shifts to a new set of issues.
To make sure productivity doesn’t slow after you walk out of the room, do two things after and in between meetings: Quickly send out clear and concise meeting notes and follow up on the commitments made.
Sharing a summary of the meeting is an important part of working on engagement.
Here’s what works: Distribute concise, clear notes about the meeting.
Historically, minutes were like court transcriptions, capturing everything that was said during the meeting.
Two years later, nothing had happened and the president was convinced it was because the people in that meeting didn’t have the right skills.
If he’d checked in with the group two weeks after the meeting, then followed up every few weeks until the project was up and running, it likely would’ve been a different story.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A List Of 8 Core Values I Live By”

Your core values are the result of your behavior.
We collectively underestimate the importance of values.
We think our values have everything to do with how we are perceived.
Since you have to live with yourself, your values should be one of the most important things in your life.
What if you don’t have values? Or what if you’ve never thought about setting your own core values? There are great risks involved with living without values.
Before you know it, you adopt the values of other people.
That’s why recently sat down to define my own personal core values to get things straight for myself.
Never copy someone else’s values or search for “Core values list” on Google.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Key to Good Luck Is an Open Mind”

As Richard Wiseman, the Professor of Public Understanding of Psychology at the University of Hertfordshire, in the United Kingdom, puts it, lucky people “Appear to have an uncanny ability to be in the right place at the right time and enjoy more than their fair share of lucky breaks.”
What do these people have that the rest of us don’t? It turns out “Ability” is the key word here.
“He takes people who self-define as lucky and people who don’t say they’re lucky, and then he puts a $20 bill in the street and the lucky people notice them and pick them up. And unlucky people don’t.”
He turned these findings into a “Luck school” where people could learn luck-inducing techniques based on four main principles of luck: maximizing chance opportunities, listening to your intuition, expecting good fortune, and turning bad luck to good.
“I thought if Wiseman can train people to be lucky, you can certainly teach those skills to our kids, and they have other really good side effects too,” says Carter, like better social skills and a stronger sense of gratitude.
Lucky people don’t magically attract new opportunities and good fortune.
“We teach our kids not to talk to strangers and we teach them to fear other people, and that shuts them down to the opportunities that people might bring, but also creates anxiety,” says Carter.
Proponents of “Stranger danger” might balk, but the idea is relatively straightforward: reduce kids’ fear and anxiety toward meeting new people, and consequently open them up to the advantageous connections that people can bring.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happened to the Uber-for-X Companies”

Very successful companies, the Ubers and Lyfts, do begin to shift urban systems-but only once they’ve been operating for long enough.
It’s not hard to look around the world and see all those zeroes of capital going into dog-walking companies and wonder: Is this really the best and highest use of the Silicon Valley innovation ecosystem? In the 10 years since Uber launched, phones haven’t changed all that much.
Some people’s time and effort are worth hundreds of times less than other people’s.
The widening gap between the new American aristocracy and everyone else is what drives both the supply and demand of Uber-for-X companies.
The inequalities of capitalist economies are not exactly news.
In the short-lived narrowing of economic fortunes wrapped around the Second World War that created what Americans think of as “The middle class,” servants became far less common, even as dual-income families became more the norm and the hours Americans worked lengthened.
What the combined efforts of the Uber-for-X companies created is a new form of servant, one distributed through complex markets to thousands of different people.
They’ve definitely generated huge fortunes for a very small number of people.

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Summary of “What to Eat to Live to 100”

I aspire to live an incredibly long, happy, and healthy life.
The book is fantastic and I highly recommend it for anyone who is looking to live a longer, happier life.
Food Guidelines to Live By:.95% of your food should be plant-based.
Knowing your sense of purpose, or reason for living, has been shown to add up to 7 years of life expectancy.
Attending faith-based services 4 times per month has been shown to add 4-14 years to your life.
Committing to a life partner can add up to 3 years of life expectancy.
Here’s to a long, happy, healthy, and fulfilling life!
Rew Merle writes about living well, including good habits for happiness, health, productivity, and success.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Diary of a concussion”

A concussion occurs when the brain hits the skull, even if the person’s head doesn’t collide with an object.
There’s a period of diminished activity from brain cells, as well as reduced blood flow in the brain, according to research on the concussion cascade.
While some scientists are pursuing blood biomarkers or eye scans as a way of diagnosing a concussion, the best way of determining whether a person has a concussion or not is still a checklist of symptoms.
They’re common with brain injuries, including concussion.
“We know that if you take someone like that who doesn’t have a concussion and tell them not to do anything, they get symptoms. They get anxious and some get depressed and they get irritable.” That’s why concussion patients are encouraged to get back into activities when they start to feel able to, and to take it gently, he says.
“Concussions hadn’t really exploded on the American sports scene. It was still getting your bell rung, at that point. There was no real knowledge about what concussion truly is.” Nor was there much knowledge about concussions’ long-term effects.
Doug Baldwin, a wide receiver for the Seattle Seahawks, told Bill Simmons on Any Given Wednesday that some players cheat at the sideline concussion evaluation so they’ll be put back in the game.
Why would a player fake out the concussion protocol? Most players will do whatever it takes to play, Utecht said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why So Many Smart People Aren’t Happy”

What we were trying to do in that particular study is bring that focus back into people’s attention.
What people might do varies, but when there’s a reminder, what we discover is that-and these are studies conducted with Fortune 500 employees, undergraduate students-they make seemingly small, you might even call them trivial, decisions, but they add up to a happier life overall.
This simple reminder on an everyday basis is a kind of reality check, which puts things in perspective for people.
Pinsker: What do you think it is about the messages people receive about what it takes to be successful in business that runs counter to this mindset? In other words, do you think that working your way up any professional ladder requires not thinking in terms of abundance?
Raghunathan: Daniel Pink, in his book Drive, talks about how what used to be used as motivators to employees-what he calls the carrots and sticks approach-are now being replaced by what he calls “Motivation 2.0,” which is more trying to figure out what is it that people are really passionate about.
In business schools, I see that there’s a huge push towards corporate social responsibility and finding a passion, but at the same time, if you look at the kinds of people who get invited to come give keynote addresses, or what it is that we focus on to improve our Businessweek rankings, it’s things that are extrinsic.
We invite people who made a million bucks, and we look at incoming MBA students and their outgoing salaries.
Pinsker: You mentioned earlier how easily people adapt to positive changes in their lives, and I’m familiar with the research showing that lottery winners are no happier, a year later, than even people who just as recently suffered serious injuries.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Problem With Nostalgia”

One familiar nostalgia exercise happens when people – whether they were alive back then or not – lazily compare the best of the past with the worst of the present.
New York City in the late 1970s is largely remembered as a time when the legendary disco Studio 54 attracted a glamorous crowd who danced and partied with abandon.
The era of dazzling club “Celebutantes” was also a time of yuppies, gentrification, ’round the clock networking, and Madonna’s relentless, take-no-prisoners drive to make it big – an act of tunnel vision I witnessed up close.
The big-haired era brought some deafeningly bombing movies and possibly the four worst sitcoms of all time: Punky Brewster, Small Wonder, ALF, and She’s The Sheriff In music, Phil Collins’ droning “Sussudio” was a low point, along with Bobby McFerrin’s chirpy “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” and the fraudulent schlock of Milli Vanilli, the pop duo who were as dubbed as Lina Lamont in Singin’ in the Rain.
Today, the people who complain that New York has lost its edge generally either live in high-rise co-ops or moved to far-away cities where you get a terrace and a garage.
The old edge wasn’t all fabulous and the new edge isn’t all gone, but it’s easier for some to reduce all that to a nostalgic yelp of “I love the ’80s!”. * * *. Nineties nostalgia is all the rage right now, with sitcom reboots, musicals based on movies from Pretty Woman to Clueless, and various small-screen crime reenactments.
It’ll be time for the inevitable aughts revival – followed, of course, by the teens – when we’ll have parades in the street to commemorate the rise of important cultural icon Paris Hilton, as well as the emergence of the scintillating Kardashian clan, when in actuality they steal whatever brain cells are left in us after mind-crushing days spent reading Facebook posts about Adam Levine’s tattoos and Roseanne’s meltdowns.
Michael Musto is a weekly columnist for NewNowNext.com and a freelance writer for outlets from the New York Times Styles section to the Daily Beast.

The orginal article.