Summary of “NFL protests: 2 years of NFL protests, explained”

Exactly two years later, the controversy over NFL players’ decision to protest against racial inequality by kneeling during the national anthem before NFL games has enmeshed the country’s most popular sports league – one whose 32 teams are worth roughly $75 billion, more than the MLB and the NBA combined – in a political and cultural firestorm it most definitely did not want.
As the anthem protests expanded, so did the backlash The anthem protests began with Colin Kaepernick, who first sat during the anthem and then, after speaking with a former NFL player who had served as a Green Beret, knelt.
Though some conservatives viewed Kaepernick’s protest as an expression of free speech, many on the right didn’t see it that way, seeing the protests as an example of the “Politicization of sports” or “Symbolic of how liberalism has been allowed to spread unchecked through our culture,” and, most importantly, indicative of anti-Americanism run amok, as NFL players “Disrespected” the American flag and veterans of the wars fought to protect it.
There are 32 NFL teams, with 53 active players on each team, for a total of 1,696 NFL players active at a time.
Donald J. Trump October 10, 2017 Complicated, with no ending in sight Now, with preseason games taking place and about a month left until the NFL regular season, the NFL owners and players are still battling over the protests.
In May, the NFL and the owners agreed to a policy in which players would be expected to stand for the anthem if they were on the sidelines but were given the option of remaining in the locker room instead, with fines levied by the NFL for any protests.
NFL players who just wanted to go back to the pre-2009 system – where players stayed in the locker room for the national anthem – filed a grievance with the league via the NFL players union.
Many NFL players want to find a way to settle the issue – as do NFL owners and the league itself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The New-Look Nashville Country Music Dream”

At 34 years old, he is still trying to break through, now on Year 7 in what people have long called a “10-year town.” In April, Rolling Stone named him one of “10 New Country Artists You Need to Know.” Early this year, he booked seven opening slots on Wade Bowen’s European tour.
At a festival where the music itself can serve largely as a soundtrack to the party, in an industry and a city both undergoing massive changes, Danaher is, like so many who come to Nashville to pursue careers as musical artists, still very much trying to figure out where he fits in.
In their place are new rituals and benchmarks, all fueled by the same senses of ambition and wonder that have brought aspiring artists to Nashville for more than 50 years.
“Up until a couple years ago,” he says, “You could walk down Music Row and see people writing songs together on porches. Now those places have been torn down and turned into condos.” It’s a bit of a stretch; while new high-rises do seem to shoot up by the month-Music Row still maintains a relatively quiet and neighborly feel-but Turner’s point remains.
Today, Turner works as director of marketing for Music Starts Here, a social network for people involved with Nashville’s music industry, which Turner says has more than 80,000 people in its database.
Streaming services such as Spotify and Apple Music now deliver vast libraries of music to equally vast hordes of subscribers, but the equation for artists and labels alike has drastically changed.
“Stuff happens in two weeks in Nashville that would take two years in Austin.” He found a room for $300 a month in a small house in East Nashville.
Danaher has had a couple of songs he wrote featured as background music on TV shows-one for The Ranch, another for Nashville.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The History of the Wildcat, 10 Years Later”

Ten years ago, the wildcat ripped the league in half, Aaron Rodgers made his first start for the Packers, Brett Favre played 16 games for the Jets, the Patriots missed the playoffs, and most shocking of all, Jeff Fisher coached a team that won-you’re really not gonna believe this-13 whole games.
Lee, with Sparano’s and Henning’s blessings, talked to the running backs with an idea for the wildcat as an occasional trick play: Williams would play quarterback and Brown would be in constant motion as a threat to run horizontally across the field on any play.
The offense built on itself until Brown was comfortable enough to read plays and run what is effectively a zone read. Cobbs said that against Seattle in Week 10, Brown was running an advanced form-over two years before the so-called zone-read revolution with quarterbacks like Tim Tebow, Colin Kaepernick, and Russell Wilson.
Parcells told coaches long before the wildcat launched that he envisioned both running backs playing simultaneously, similar to when he was an assistant at Florida State in the early 1970s and the team employed the split-back offense.
Polite said Williams was one of the smartest running backs in history and a player who simplified the sport more than any player he’s been around.
During their tenure as teammates, one moment against the New Orleans Saints sticks out: a toss play, which Polite explains, is among a running back’s least favorite plays because the toss is usually so wide that it leaves him with little room to operate.
Most wildcat offenses are not looking to throw, and pressure off the edge can wreck the play.
Henning still thinks the wildcat could work if an ex-quarterback who now played another position could run it with an athletic quarterback who could play receiver.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We Made Aaron Rodgers NFL Commissioner for a Day”

The first thing Rodgers would want to address is “Owners and lawyers” passing rules in the offseason without player involvement: “The owners shouldn’t be able to pass rules without ratifying it through the players.” This, he said, includes rules about the offseason structure and limits on practice time that directly affect players.
Rodgers does not have a blanket idea in mind for an anthem-related policy, saying he simply would ask for the Players Association’s input.
The NFL has no such drama in its offseason; elite players rarely reach the open market or switch teams.
Rodgers has two seasons left on his contract, and he’s widely expected to become one of the highest-paid players in league history when he signs a new pact.
Rodgers is clear that something should be done to increase player involvement in decisions at owners meetings.
He’s skeptical of the new kickoff rule, which owners passed in May. Rodgers doesn’t think the new policy, which bans running head starts before the kick, will make it any less likely that players will collide.
In ESPN’s 2018 “World Fame 100,” which measures worldwide fame, the top NFL player, Tom Brady, checks in at no.
He also thinks teams should do more to highlight the causes players support off the field: “That would help to change some of the issues.” Rodgers said that more people should look at the percentages of NFL players arrested and see that there isn’t an epidemic of crime among NFL players: “Compare that per capita for the population, obviously our numbers are a lot lower. But it’s the summertime, it’s slow, and there’s not a whole lot going on; that’s obviously big news. I wish that we could continue to highlight the things guys were doing with their own causes.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is Ido Portal’s ‘Movement Culture’ For Real?”

Portal has been called a “Guru” and a “Movement master” more times than I can count; one interviewer even called him “The smartest man in the world.” But the question-hotly debated on Reddit and on MMA blogs-endures: Is there value in the movement, or is Portal simply slinging snake oil?
The walls of the Ido Portal movement school are covered in handprints, scuff marks, and phrases like isolation integration improvisation and Let them DIRTY the walls, motherfucker! The equipment scattered about is basic: gymnastics rings, monkey bars, wooden sticks, tennis balls.
Or, to hear Portal tell it, in each session students “Step into the cloud of movement and attack a subject” by doing drills or challenges, “Maybe it’s coordination, or speed …” Training in “Movement” might look or sound frivolous to outsiders, but Portal and his tribe are nothing if not serious about it.
McGregor credits movement training with his ability to “Fight in many stances, from many different angles,” with feeling “Loose but connected at the same time.”(“I’m more a squeeze of the lime at the end of the dish,” Portal said about his own influence.
Portal may shun the “Movement guru” title, but his narrative about how movement culture came to be only bolsters this image.
In the mid-2000s, Portal founded a new training space in Haifa where he and his devoted capoeira students began experimenting with movement outside of the martial art.
His students weren’t content to stop training; one of his closest students, Odelia Goldschmidt, started a small training group in a local park called “The Freaks.” Shortly thereafter, with Portal’s blessing, her brother Roye opened the movement facility in Tel Aviv, and Portal started a mentorship program to pass on his methods.
Movement schools have cropped up around the world-in Boulder, New York City, Miami; in Europe, Hong Kong, Brazil, and Australia-mostly started by the students of the Ido Portal mentorship program.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Browns Are the Most Interesting 0-16 Team in NFL History”

None of his predecessors lasted for more than three years.
At the very least, the Browns are more interesting than they have been in years past.
There are still dozens of outstanding questions: When will Mayfield start? Which of their young players can take the leap? Is Hue Jackson the long-term coach? And then there’s the overarching concern that’s been looming over Cleveland for 20 years since the franchise’s rebirth: When will the Cleveland Browns be genuinely good?
“You wipe off the stigma a little bit so all of the sudden, [free-agent] guys are actually excited and you don’t have to overspend.” This haul of free agents includes tackle Chris Hubbard, who signed from Pittsburgh for five years and $36.5 million; T.J. Carrie, a cornerback from Oakland; running back Carlos Hyde, who’ll make $5 million a year for three years; and cornerback E.J. Gaines from Buffalo.
There’s a plan at quarterback in Cleveland, and that’s more than you can say of previous years.
Defensive lineman Larry Ogunjobi played well last year.
That Packers team improved to 9-7 from 4-12, and the Chiefs team went to 11-5 from 2-14 the previous year.
With the upgrades, the Browns are certain to be, uh, better than the 1-31 record they’ve had the past two years, though that’s hardly the point.

The orginal article.

Summary of “E-sports leagues are starting to look a lot like the NFL and NBA”

Now, some of the biggest professional e-sports leagues in the world are starting to look a lot like the NBA or NFL. That includes big-money owners, a structured schedule, and things like minimum salaries and other benefits for players.
Even the NBA has launched its own league, partnering with publisher Take-Two on the 17-team NBA 2K League.
By having permanent teams that fans can become attached to and owners can invest in for the long-term, these leagues are hoping to build something that can eventually compete with more established professional sports leagues.
For many of these owners – who reportedly paid a $20 million fee to be part of the league – the familiar structure of a traditional sports league like the NBA was comforting, in large part because the business model is proven, something that’s not true for many e-sports leagues.
If Blizzard can make good on translating the global, inclusive nature of Overwatch to the players in the Overwatch League, it could represent a significant advantage over the traditional sports leagues it’s aiming to compete with.
“It’s a really fascinating case study that a lot of leagues will look to to learn about the idea of regional teams, and building strong brands within cities,” says Hopper.
Last February, game publisher Take-Two announced a partnership with the NBA to launch a new professional league based on NBA 2K, one of the best-selling sports games in the world.
The NBA has long been one of the most forward-thinking sports leagues in North America.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Way-Too-Early 2018 NBA Redraft”

Tjarks: In all seriousness, I wouldn’t let Smith’s struggles as a rookie affect my opinion of SGA. For one, I’m still really high on Smith, especially now that he’s playing with Doncic in Dallas.
There are a lot of big men at the next level who can be excellent roll men if they are playing in sufficient space.
He’s a decent shooter, but he doesn’t have much fluidity when it comes to putting the ball on the floor and making plays in space.
Robinson might fly across the court to block shots, but can he read pick-and-roll defense? Can he defend without carelessly fouling? Can he execute offensive sets? Williams was suspended in college for breaking team rules, was a low-effort player on the court, came into pre-draft workouts out of shape, missed his conference call with the media the morning after the draft, missed his flight to his first practice, and got red-flagged by multiple teams for his knee issue.
In 2015, would you not have drafted Karl-Anthony Towns, Jahlil Okafor, or Kristaps Porzingis just because you could get Bobby Portis, Larry Nance Jr., or Chris McCullough in the late first round? Okafor might’ve been a mistake, but if that were the mind-set you might end up with a lesser player.
He’s an eyesore on defense, despite the fact he plays hard, because his reaction time is so poor.
He’s a well-rounded player who impacts the game in a lot of different ways.
The interesting thing is that his summer league team was a lot like his college team in that he dominated the ball and didn’t really have anyone else to play off.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The NBA Is a Cold World for Non-superstars”

As the league’s popularity surges, NBA players seem to have more power than ever.
Though every NBA roster carries at least 13 players, the league is increasingly being shaped by only a handful of superstars.
What does a player “Deserve”? It’s a question that’s being debated not just in the NBA, but in other sports like the NFL, where contracts are shorter and come with a lot less guaranteed money.
Most NFL players can lose their status in an instant, given that very few non-QB players are irreplaceable.
Players’ power has an unpalatable side effect on their peers: It limits the agency of other, non-superstar players.
All players like DeRozan could do was speak out after the fact.
Though Kawhi’s situation feels like a once-in-a-blue-moon scenario given how long and thorny it became, it won’t be long before another player exerts his superstar power.
Recent CBA negotiations have stopped short of abolishing the max contract, with the league and the players union choosing instead to distribute the money that would surely go to the likes of LeBron and others to the rest of the non-superstar players.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Zach Lowe on the Chicago Bulls, Jabari Parker and Lauri Markkanen”

Jabari Parker doesn’t want to hear how the Bulls, in Year 2 of a rebuild after a slapdash ending to the Derrick Rose and Jimmy Butler eras, will have problems finding touches for all their score-first young guys.
Chicago is hoping Parker channels his edge into the sort of all-around effort that could bring balance to a young roster light on defense, playmaking, and overall hoops IQ. They already know the jewel of that core, Lauri Markkanen, plays with a swagger that frankly surprised them.
Markkanen can really shoot, and the threat he presents off the ball gives him confidence Chicago can make it work with Zach LaVine, Kris Dunn, Parker, and Markkanen jostling for touches.
The Bulls still ended up with Wendell Carter Jr. at No. 7, and they are thrilled with his potential as an Al Horford-style fulcrum who makes plays in space – a perfect frontcourt partner for Markkanen.
When Parker and Markkanen man the forward positions, lots of opponents will try to arrange things so that a wing defends Markkanen – leaving a bulkier player on Parker.
Markkanen is adding weight in anticipation of playing more center – a look Hoiberg likes, even though Chicago hemorrhaged points in that alignment last season.
With LaVine locked into one wing spot, most rival executives would have recommended Chicago shift away from Parker – and use his slot to take unwanted salary from Denver, along with the Nuggets’ 2019 first-round pick.
If Parker disappoints, the Bulls can decline their option on him for 2019-20.

The orginal article.