Summary of “Why we should be watching the sun, not the clock”

Today, Bad Kissingen has rebranded itself as the world’s first ChronoCity – a place where internal time is as important as external time, and sleep is sacrosanct.
Most of us are not free to choose our work or school hours; we have little control over the lighting in our public spaces and external environment; and we are even forced to reprogramme our internal clock twice a year because of daylight saving time.
Quickly, the two men began drawing up a manifesto of the things they’d like to change: schools should start later, children be educated outdoors where possible, and examinations not conducted in the mornings; businesses should be encouraged to offer flexitime, allowing people to work and study when they felt at their best; health clinics could pioneer chronotherapies, tailoring drug treatments to patients’ internal time; hotels might offer guests variable meal- and check-out times; and buildings should be modified to let in more daylight.
In southern England many would like to see the entire country shifted permanently forward into Central European Time, given that, in Britain, the annual changing of clocks back to winter time means that it gets dark as early as 4pm in December and early January.
In a country with the same time zone – and the same TV and radio shows, school start times, and work culture – you might expect that everyone would rise at more or less the same time, but Roenneberg has demonstrated that people’s chronotype – their innate propensity to sleep at a particular time – is shackled to sunrise.
A similar pattern has been documented in the US, where those living on the eastern edge of its time zones get up earlier than those on the western edge, where the sun rises later.
Rather than judging colleagues on how they spent their time, workers were encouraged to work at whatever time or place they wanted, so long as they achieved specific results, such as delivering finished projects to customers.
It’s about internal time, not what the clock on the wall says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lauryn Hill, Tara Westover, ‘Cameron Post’: A Year of Miseducation”

Stories of miseducation echoed across 2018, in Lauryn Hill’s New Jersey studio, in Cameron Post’s fictional boarding school, in a scrap heap in rural Idaho, and beyond.
In the late ’90s, when Miseducation was recorded, Ras Baraka was an activist and educator in an occupied school district.
To Booker, miseducation would mean living with public schools that had demonstrated little capacity to educate their children.
Senior year at my school always began with a class retreat.
A year into college, the spell of my miseducation had worn off enough that I found myself taking courses on the Bible again-multiple ones, even though I had rarely experienced a day of schooling from first through 12th grade that didn’t begin with a lesson on that book.
As his memoir tells it, James and his three friends decided to attend St. Vincent-St. Mary High School, a private school, because of a pact the four friends made to stay together, instead of the public school Buchtel, a launching pad for many of the city’s black athletes.
Like the schools James attended from kindergarten to eighth grade, I Promise is a traditional district public school.
Most of the money to create and support the school comes from Akron Public Schools.

The orginal article.

Summary of “School lockdowns: How many American children have hidden from gun violence?”

More than 4.1 million students endured at least one lockdown in the 2017-2018 school year alone, according to a first-of-its-kind analysis by The Washington Post that included a review of 20,000 news stories and data from school districts in 31 of the country’s largest cities.
The total figure is likely much higher because many school districts – including in Detroit and Chicago – do not track them and hundreds never make the news, particularly when they happen at urban schools attended primarily by children of color.
Still, on a typical day last school year, at least 16 campuses locked down, with nine related to gun violence or the threat of it.
School systems in every state and the District had several last school year, The Post’s analysis found, and they happened in buildings with as few as four students and as many as 5,000.
Last school year, the system Czajkowski oversees, Sweetwater Union High School District, dealt with 71 student threats, he said, but only seven times did schools lock down, and five of those were prompted by off-campus danger, such as a burglary or gunfire.
In the month after dozens of people were slaughtered at a Las Vegas country music festival on Oct. 1, 2017, the number of lockdowns in Nevada’s Clark County School District spiked 42 percent to a total of 37, the highest count during the entire school year.
Last school year, there were 136 lockdowns of varying degrees across the 110 schools in the Columbus district, one of the highest ratios among large-city systems that The Post reviewed.
A year of carnage in American schools In April, the country will mark the 20th anniversary of the massacre at Columbine High, and that day will arrive in the aftermath of the worst year of school shootings in modern American history.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Later School Start Times Really Do Work To Help Teens Get More Sleep”

Later School Start Times Really Do Work To Help Teens Get More Sleep : Shots – Health News American teens are chronically sleep deprived, in part because of early school start times.
How much difference can a later start make? As Seattle’s school district found out, it can help a lot.
As evidence grows that chronic sleep deprivation puts teens at risk for physical and mental health problems, there is increasing pressure on school districts around the country to consider a later start time.
They found students got 34 minutes more sleep on average with the later school start time.
“This study shows a significant improvement in the sleep duration of students, all by delaying school start times so they’re more in line with the natural wake-up times of adolescents,” says senior author Horacio de la Iglesia, a University of Washington researcher and professor of biology.
Seattle’s switch to later start times is still unusual for school districts around the country, where school typically starts around 8 a.m. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a policy statement calling on school districts to move start times to 8:30 a.m. or later for middle and high schools so that students can get at least 8 1/2 hours of sleep a night.
Franklin High School science teacher A.J. Katzaroff says “There was lots of yawning” when school started at 7:50 a.m. Students had a hard time engaging in the work or in brief discussions, which is extremely unfortunate.
The later school start time gave them a better opportunity to make it to school on time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Should Parents Eat Lunch With Their Children at School?”

“The parents would bring pizza for some students and not others. It became a little bit of a circus and I do remember feeling like it was disruptive instead of being just a sweet lunch between just the mom and the kid,” she said.
Other children whose parents aren’t able to visit them can be left feeling neglected.
School districts have attempted to thwart these problems by forcing parents to sit with just their own children, sometimes in separate rooms or areas.
Rogers Middle School in Texas even offers parents and children the opportunity to dine at a “Bistro” with fancy-looking chairs to avoid lunchroom disruption.
“Some parents make hot lunch at home and bring it to them.” She says that there are at least seven or eight parents a day in her school’s lunchroom.
Parents who do eat with their children said that family lunches are a positive thing.
They argue, schools should be encouraging parents to become more active and involved in their children’s school lives.
In her district, she says, there are parents who join their children for lunch up to three days a week.

The orginal article.

Summary of “25 Lessons Business School Won’t Ever Teach You”

There are a lot of great lessons you can learn in business school.
Some of the most important lessons you’ll ever learn about how to be successful in business comes from getting out there and doing it.
If you’re hoping that MBA will be your golden ticket to kickstarting a successful career in business, consider these all-important 25 lessons that you’ll have to learn outside the classroom.
This is a topic rarely covered in business school.
Business school will teach you the steps you should follow when forming a business: how to do research, come up with a plan, make a budget, choose a business structure and so on.
Weighing opportunity versus potential failure is often personal – you must take into account so many factors beyond the business formulas you learn in school.
Business school may teach you that disruption begins with defining a solution to a problem and then finding a way to add value to customers’ experience.
Learning to navigate the harsh business world will teach you more than you can ever learn in a classroom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Helping My Fair-Skinned Son Embrace His Blackness”

For the most part, the neighborhood in New Haven, Connecticut, where we lived for the first 11 years of our son’s life was a refuge from such skeptics.
Sure, the new crop of Yale grad students and junior faculty who moved in each year often looked askance when our son would yell “Mom” to me across grocery-store aisles, but they soon caught on.
Like other mixed-race children, our son started his journey to figure out his racial identity early.
School is the place where kids navigate their identity and relationships apart from their families.
In our children’s case, school was also separate from their neighborhood: Each day, they boarded a bus to attend a diverse magnet school about five miles from our home.
We moved to Washington, D.C., after 16 years in New Haven, and mere weeks before our children started high school and middle school.
Our son sat alongside his cousins of varying hues of black and brown as they listened to stories about how their great-uncle was fired from his factory job after he told his boss he supported Martin Luther King Jr., and how he later sold scrap metal to send my eldest cousin to college.
Our son roared with laughter as his mother and aunties stayed up late singing and dancing to soul, R&B, and old-school hip-hop.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Millions of Teens Can’t Finish Their Homework”

In what’s often referred to as the “Homework gap,” the unequal access to digital devices and high-speed internet prevents 17 percent of teens from completing their homework assignments, according to the new Pew analysis, which surveyed 743 students ages 13 through 17.
Black teens are especially burdened by the homework gap: One in four of them at least sometimes struggle to complete assignments because of a lack of technology at home.
The homework gap can have major consequences, with some studies suggesting that teens who lack access to a computer at home are less likely to graduate from high school than their more technologically equipped peers.
The “Challenge to complete homework in safe, predictable, and productive environments can have lifelong impacts on their ability to achieve their full potential,” wrote John Branam, who runs an initiative to provide lacking teens with internet access, in an op-ed for The Hechinger Report last year.
While disadvantaged students can resort to public libraries and other venues that offer free Wi-Fi, such alternatives are still major obstacles to finishing homework every night.
“Your aunt has internet access [at home] but she lives a 40-minute bus trip across town,” Barnum wrote, illustrating the roadblocks for teens without internet access.
The researchers’ forthcoming book, The Digital Edge: How Black and Latino Youth Navigate Digital Inequality, chronicles the ways low-income students of color get around not having access to the internet and a computer.
In what Watkins calls “Social hacking,” students often “Reengineer their socioeconomic circumstances in order to get access to technology that they otherwise would not have access to.” For example, the researchers observed that students without such resources at home were adept at developing relationships with teachers who could, say, give them special weekend access to laptops and software for use at home.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mount Hood’s Deadliest Disaster”

Today is the 32nd annual Mount Hood Climb Service Day, and Melissa Robinson, the middle school chaplain, is offering a benediction.
The Oregon Episcopal School Mount Hood climb remains, to this day, the second-deadliest alpine accident in North American history, behind a 1981 avalanche on Mount Rainier that killed 11.
In the early hours of Tuesday, May 13, Mark Kelsey’s phone rang: there was trouble on Mount Hood, involving student climbers who were due back and hadn’t been seen.
“You can’t even stand up in 100-mile-per-hour winds,” says Matt Zaffino, the KGW meteorologist and a climber who has summited Mount Hood twice.
It’s later in the morning on Mount Hood Climb Service Day, and kids in first through fifth grade from the Lower School have gathered in the chapel.
“We do take a chance … every single year before Mount Hood Climb Service Day, to remember the story of the Mount Hood climb,” he says softly.
Over the past 32 years, there has never been another Oregon Episcopal-sponsored student expedition to climb Mount Hood.
“Leaving a prayer for eternal healing and acceptance of what we cannot understand,” the text read, “For all those impacted by the OES climb of Mt. Hood May of 1986.” Lamb is aware that his loss-though deep-was not commensurate with the loss of a child or a sibling or a parent or a spouse.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Amazon HQ2 Could Make Tech Diversity Worse in Atlanta”

When Lonnell Warner was in middle school, his family moved from Atlanta to a suburb just outside town.
Eventually Warner got into a fight with a white student.
Warner secured his degree by homeschooling back in Atlanta, but he was off track for the jobs in computing that he had hoped to pursue after graduation.
Those alternate pathways to computing education, like boot camps and IT certification courses, would seem to offer the perfect solution for aspiring tech workers like him.
In advance of its promise of 50,000 new jobs to its chosen HQ2 location, Amazon has pledged $50 million to STEM education over the next five years.
10 million of that already went to Code.org, a nonprofit that supports expanding computer-science education and diversity.
Amazon also donated $300,000 each to Greater Foundation and the Technology Access Foundation, investments meant to help local nonprofits help students without access to computer-science education.
Warner had to make a living, so he took a job doing facilities work at a local university.

The orginal article.