Summary of “If Coronavirus Scares You, Read This to Take Control Over Your Health Anxiety”

When news of the coronavirus broke at the end of last year, and as the stories from the outbreak became more alarming over time, I found myself wondering how health anxiety sufferers were coping.
In late 2015, I suffered a post-traumatic stress disorder relapse which led to debilitating anxiety, much of which was health-related.
Approximately 40 million American adults – roughly 18 percent of the population – have an anxiety disorder, while in the UK there were 8.2 million cases of anxiety in 2013.
There are few statistics about health anxiety, but it can affect those who have an existing anxiety disorder or those who have experienced a life event such as bereavement, birth trauma or an accident.
1) Avoid the News We all want to keep up to date, but when you have health anxiety the need to check and read the latest updates can become compulsive, feeding the anxiety.
Your brain creates a feedback cycle where you become increasingly reliant on reassurance, which only serves to reinforce the anxiety.
It’s natural to want your loved ones to tell you things will be OK, but when you start needing that reassurance several times a day it’s time to take a step back.3) Introduce an Absolute Ban on Googling Symptoms Dr Google is not, and never will be, your friend, especially not when you are a sufferer of health anxiety.
It doesn’t need to involve spending money: you can also cook yourself something nice, have a hot bath, or listen to a song you love.9) Remember That Your Anxious State Isn’t Permanent When you are in it, anxiety always feels as though it will never end, but it will.

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Summary of “Food Safety and Coronavirus: A Comprehensive Guide”

To answer these questions, I referenced dozens of articles and scientific reports and enlisted the help of Ben Chapman, a food safety specialist from the North Carolina State University and cohost of Risky or Not and Food Safety Talk.
Some possible oral-fecal transmission routes would be from poor hygiene during food preparation, or the exposure of food crops to human fecal matter in the field during growth or harvest.
According to multiple health and safety organizations worldwide, including the CDC, the USDA, and the European Food safety Authority, there is currently no evidence that COVID-19 has spread through food or food packaging.
Previous coronavirus epidemics likewise showed no evidence of having been spread through food or packaging.
Does Chinese food pose a greater risk than other food? What about imported food and goods?
To reheat cutlets, casseroles, or bread in the oven, preheat the oven to 400°F, place the food on an oven-safe tray with shallow sides, and heat until the surface of the food is too hot to touch for more than an instant.
Reiterate the importance of hygiene and food safety protocols to all crew members.
If you order either my first book, The Food Lab, or my upcoming children’s book Every Night is Pizza Night through that link, not only will 100% of my sales commission be going directly towards producing food to be served free of charge to needy families and individuals affected by school and business shut-downs in San Mateo, an additional 10% of the sale cost will go to a nationwide network of independent bookstores.

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Summary of “The Mathematics of Passwords”

Moore’s law explains why a relatively weak password will not suffice for long-term use: over time computers using brute force can find passwords faster.
If A = 26 and N = 6, then T = 308,915,776 D = 0.0000858 computing hour X = 0; it is already possible to crack all passwords in the space in under an hour If A = 26 and N = 12, then T = 9.5 1016D = 26,508 computing hours X = 29 years before passwords can be cracked in under an hour.
If A = 100 and N = 10, then T = 1020D = 27,777,777 computing hours X = 49 years before passwords can be cracked in under an hour If A = 100 and N = 15, then T = 1030D = 2.7 1017 computing hours X = 115 years before passwords can be cracked in under an hour If A = 200 and N = 20, then T = 1.05 1046D = 2.7 1033 computing hours X = 222 years before passwords can be cracked in under an hour.
As the main text explains, instead of storing clients’ passwords, Internet servers store the “Fingerprints” of these passwords: sequences of characters that are derived from the passwords.
You can check whether any of your passwords has already been hacked by using a Web tool called Pwned Passwords.
In the age of the Internet, supercomputers and computer networks, the science of password setting and cracking continues to evolve-as does the relentless struggle between those who strive to protect passwords and those who are determined to steal, and potentially abuse, them.
The password is contained in the possibility space of strings of 12 lowercase letters, which corresponds to 56 bits of information and 2612 possible passwords.
Here is how it works: First, we need a function R that transforms a fingerprint h(P) into a new password R(h(P. One might consider fingerprints as numbers written in the binary numeral system and consider passwords as numbers written in the K numeral system, where K is the number of allowable symbols for passwords.

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Summary of “The New Age of Astrology”

In the decades between the New Age boom and now, while astrology certainly didn’t go away-you could still regularly find horoscopes in the back pages of magazines-it “Went back to being a little bit more in the background,” says Chani Nicholas, an astrologer based in Los Angeles.
In some ways, astrology is perfectly suited for the internet age.
She has around 1 million monthly readers online, and recently snagged a book deal-one of four new mainstream astrology guidebooks sold in a two-month period in summer 2017, according to Publisher’s Marketplace.
Ruby Warrington is a lifestyle writer whose New Age guidebook Material Girl, Mystical World came out in May 2017-just ahead of the wave of astrology book sales this summer.
JWT and another trend-forecasting group, WGSN, in its report “Millennials: New Spirituality,” lump astrology in with other New Age mystical trends that have caught on with young people in recent years: healing crystals, sound baths, and tarot, among others.
A sincere burgeoning interest in astrology doesn’t mean people are wholesale abandoning rationality for more mystical beliefs.
Nicholas Campion, a historian of astrology, points out that the question of whether people “Believe” in astrology is both impossible to answer, and not really a useful question to ask.
“Astrology is a system that looks at cycles, and we use the language of planets,” says Alec Verkuilen Brogan, a 29-year-old chiropractic student based in the Bay Area who has also studied astrology for 10 years.

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Summary of “Preparing to shelter in place for coronavirus: A printable guide to what you need at home”

Staying home means that sick people spread the virus to fewer additional people.
In general, rethink your household habits now that you’re hopefully washing more, wiping down surfaces more, and spending more time at home – what do you need to keep up your improved habits?
You will be much less happy stuck at home without them, and as things get worse a run out to the local coffee shop may not be a good idea.
So be prepared to treat everything from home: Do you have rehydration fluids? bandages? Over-the-counter meds? Antiseptic wipes? Cold packs? Things like food poisoning or stomach flu can be safely treated at home unless you’re “Unable to keep down any fluids and have symptoms of dehydration,” Dixon-Luinenburg said.
Plan what you’ll need to keep yourself and your family entertained at home.
Hobbies: Have you been considering taking up embroidery? Knitting? Miniature furniture making? Baking? It’s a good time to dive into an activity you can do at home.
Things for working-from-home: If your job is possible to do remotely, you should prepare for being encouraged or asked to work from home for the next few months.
Getting by at home means that hospital beds can be reserved for those who need them.

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Summary of “I Played ‘Fortnite’ and Figured Out the Universe”

In Fortnite Battle Royale, the world’s most popular video game, released last September and today being played by millions of people at a time, you’re dropped into the sky above a richly rendered island, 99 other players all parachuting down alongside you.
In other, similar games, this is a gruesome progression, but Fortnite renders everything with cartoony bounce; when a shot lands, the result isn’t carnage, just holographic dematerialization.
At the same time as I’ve been playing this game, I’ve been making my way through a popular science-fiction trilogy written by Liu Cixin, translated by Ken Liu, and the books have spun my evenings with Fortnite into a deeper, weirder dimension.
Once within striking distance of another player, if you don’t try your best to end their game, they will assuredly end yours.
In the beginning of each game, immediately following the parachute drop, I would often discover that another player had chosen the same landing spot as me.
In forums dedicated to Fortnite Battle Royale, some players share clips of chance alliances, and others reply glumly: “Super rare to find someone [who] won’t shoot you when you emote.” I dream of a Political Fortnite in which victory goes not to the twitchiest sniper but the most charismatic organizer, with factions forming and dissolving … I imagine the fear and thrill of seeing not one but a dozen tiny silhouettes on the far ridge-a war band sweeping fast down the hillside.
This norm isn’t absolute, of course, and it’s also a bit of a cheat, because it’s been established largely outside the game, on the message boards and streaming channels where Fortnite players gather.
The reward for players who achieve victory royale is that, in all subsequent games, they drop to the island not with a bulky parachute but a svelte parasol-a dozen murderous Mary Poppinses cutting down through the noobs.

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Summary of “How to Survive Isolation With Your Roommates, Your Partner, Your Kids”

‘Low-risk, symptom-free partners living in relative isolation together can certainly use this time to have more sex.
During that time, she learned several lessons applicable to anyone living with roommates.
What If It’s Just Me and the Kids? According to Joshua David Stein, editor-at-large of the parenting publication Fatherly, if you’re practicing social distancing with your kids, now is the time to readjust your rule structure.
Fatherly has compiled a list of at-home activities for bored kids, the internet abounds with kid-friendly podcasts, museum tours and educational videos, and Stein notes that it’s a good time to get outside and take advantage of local parks, too.
If your kids are worried about grandparents they’re unable to visit during the pandemic, Stein suggests: “Without lying, frame it in a way that will assuage their worries as much as possible. Like, ‘Grandma is doing fine, for her safety and our safety, we’re going to rely on FaceTime for now.'” It’s also to be expected that your patience will wear thin at times.
“It’s not the best thing in the world but it’s not the end of the world, don’t beat yourself up about it, try to do better next time.”
What If I’m Suddenly Spending a Lot More Time With My Live-In Partner? “This is a situation where you kind of know what is going to happen so you have time to come up with a gameplan,” says Erin Davidson, a couples and sex therapist.
While it may be a tricky time to date, low-risk, symptom-free partners living in relative isolation together can certainly use this time to have more sex.

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Summary of “Authors list the books they might finally read in quarantine”

We asked a number of authors about the books that they’ve intended to read over the years without actually reading.
For me this has to be “Middlemarch,” a book I have attempted to read over 100 times, I am sure.
“Middlemarch” is my favorite Victorian novel, but I’ve never read George Eliot’s last opus, “Daniel Deronda.” I’ve had it on my shelves since graduate school – so for nearly 20 years.
For the record, I’ve read the classic long-term TBRs – Proust, Melville and “Infinite Jest” – and see no reason to try “The Man Without Qualities” because I’ve never liked Musil all that much.
Then I will read “Lampedusa,” the novel about Giuseppe di Lampedusa, the author of “The Leopard,” and then reread “The Leopard.” Essentially I’ll engage in a series of linked exercises that will require me to make many more connections that will keep me from my fears.
One book on my ‘to read’ shelf is Yoko Tawada’s “The Emissary,” which won the National Book Award in translated literature.
For the first time in two years, I’m reading a book I don’t have to read. It’s Kate Elizabeth Russell’s “My Dark Vanessa.” I’m also rereading “Sabbath’s Theater.” Oh, and I have to add my downstairs-bathroom book too.
The book that has been on my bookshelves the longest is “Middlemarch.” Now that we’re all facing weeks of self-isolation, I might finally have a chance to read it.

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Summary of “Inside the UNMC Coronavirus Quarantine Center”

The energy of the lab-with the arrival of test results and data sets at ungodly hours, online consultations with colleagues doing lab work in other countries-proved entirely too relentless.
While her work keeps her from sleep, she is passionate about where she finds herself every day.
UNMC received permission to use the test in their own work with COVID-19 patients.
Nebraska Medicine CEO and renowned pathologist James Linder told me before I met a soul at UNMC: “The men and women who choose to work in the field of infectious disease are highly qualified. And they pretty much self-select. It’s like selecting to specialize in surgery, where you’re dealing with open bodies on a surgical table. There’s risk in it, peril. You have to be able to rely on yourself. And trust the team around you. These men and women are interested in the discipline of their process. They must trust their own abilities above all. The rigors appeal to them, and define them.”
“Then I’m going to go downstairs and begin training a new group of seven new nurses, who are going to come onto the staff. A full second team to work with and trust. More lab work to be done. More blood that can be worked with. That’s more work. That’s urgency.”
Do people beyond her family ever react to her presence? I mention the rumors about the children of quarantine workers being shunned from birthday parties.
Normally, he works in oncology and critical care unit, but now, during this coronavirus crisis, having trained and volunteered for assignment in UNMC’s biocontainment center, he’s on an upper floor of the Durham Outpatient Center.
Locals began to accept that this might just be a part of the work that makes living in Nebraska what it is-a kind of heartiness, a resilience.

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Summary of “Coronavirus: How to protect your mental health”

Coronavirus has plunged the world into uncertainty and the constant news about the pandemic can feel relentless.
All of this is taking its toll on people’s mental health, particularly those already living with conditions like anxiety and OCD. So how can we protect our mental health?
Being concerned about the news is understandable, but for many people it can make existing mental health problems worse.
When the World Health Organization released advice on protecting your mental health during the coronavirus outbreak, it was welcomed on social media.
“A lot of anxiety is rooted in worrying about the unknown and waiting for something to happen – coronavirus is that on a macro scale,” agrees Rosie Weatherley, spokesperson for mental health charity Mind.
Limit the news and be careful what you read. Reading lots of news about coronavirus has led to panic attacks for Nick, a father-of-two from Kent, who lives with anxiety.
Alison, 24, from Manchester, has health anxiety and feels compelled to stay informed and research the subject.
OCD Action has seen an increase in support requests from people whose fears have become focused on the coronavirus pandemic.

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