Summary of “The unique way the Dutch treat mentally ill prisoners”

About 124 men and 36 women live here, separate from the general prison population.
In countries like the UK and US, prisoners with mental health conditions often end up in the general prison population.
I’m visiting Zwolle prison to understand what effect this segmentation has – and to what extent it helps those who are mentally unwell.
My main focus is on how it affects women, following my in-depth piece last week looking at women with mental health issues in prisons.
Although the Netherlands has seen dramatically declining prison populations year on year, with 19 prisons recently closed, van Koningsveld explains that this is largely because of electronic ankle bracelets and an increase in community sentencing.
For psychiatric patients, particularly women, prison populations are actually increasing.
Still, one weak point that the Dutch system shares with prisons elsewhere is that it was developed largely with men in mind.
In Zwolle, Verbruggen says that isn’t the case – at least not when they enter prison.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘I Feel Pretty’ and the Rise of Beauty-Standard Denialism”

As Ms. Widdows notes, the beauty ideal is so pervasive that it is internalized in many women, who are haunted by idealized visions of their own bodies – fantasies of how they might look after undergoing extreme diets or cosmetic procedures.
“I Feel Pretty” places the blame on women.
Part of the conditioning of the “Patriarchal ideal” is to make women feel empowered by it on their “Own terms.” That way, every time you critique an unspoken requirement of women, you’re also forced to frown upon something women have chosen for themselves.
As it happens, the only black women in “I Feel Pretty” – the SoulCycle employee Sasheer Zamata and the beauty executive Naomi Campbell – are representatives of the hot-girl faction.
Vaulting a few women of color to the top gives the beauty standard a progressive sheen that helps inure it from criticism.
All the women representing standard-issue beauty in the movie – including Ms. Ratajkowski, Ms. Campbell and Michelle Williams – are incredibly thin.
What struck me was how many of the women hailed as “Strong female characters” are nevertheless required to hew to the same physical requirements as the eye candy – beautiful, young and small.
What’s more, these women are meant to be naïve to their own looks, like the heroine of “Brooklyn”: “Open-faced pretty without knowing it.” These descriptors poke at another lie in “I Feel Pretty”: that all regular women need to succeed is a healthy dose of confidence.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Janelle Monáe Found Her Voice”

The public, she explained, doesn’t really “Know Janelle Monáe, and I felt like I didn’t really have to be her because they were fine with Cindi.” When Prince died in April 2016, she started to rethink how she would present herself.
Monáe will release an extended musical film with the album that illustrates and complements “Dirty Computer.” The 50-minute “Emotion picture,” as she calls it, follows a young woman, played by Monáe, on the run from an authoritarian government that hunts down so-called deviants and “Cleans” them by erasing their memories.
Longtime fans will recognize the parallels to Mayweather – which Monáe expects – but instead of focusing on a fictional male human lover, the object of her affection is the actress Tessa Thompson, with whom Monáe is frequently photographed in real life.
Monáe is media-savvy enough to protect herself from becoming tabloid fodder for publications that want to turn her personal life into spectacle or reduce her art to her sexuality.
Combs told Monáe that he wanted to introduce her to a larger audience.
The women had gathered for a brunch that Monáe was hosting for her “Fem the Future” project to support women in the entertainment industry.
Monáe had chosen three female filmmakers to make short films funded by Belvedere vodka that answered the question: What does a beautiful future look like? The event was nominally to celebrate them but more largely to gather in one room actors, writers, directors and producers Monáe admired.
Monáe had heard that Lucia McBath, the mother of Jordan Davis; Sybrina Fulton, the mother of Trayvon Martin; and Gwen Carr, the mother of Eric Garner, were going to be there, too, and she wanted to offer support.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Doing Dishes Is a Major Source of Relationship Tension”

At the end of a long day of work, cooking, cleaning, and, for many, negotiating with small children, a couple has to face the big question: Who is going to do the dishes?
The study examined a variety of different household tasks-including shopping, laundry, and housecleaning, and found that, for women in heterosexual relationships, it’s more important to share the responsibility of doing the dishes than any other chore.
Women who wash the vast majority of the dishes themselves report more relationship conflict, less relationship satisfaction, and even worse sex, than women with partners who help.
What is it about dishes? Dan Carlson, an assistant professor of family and consumer studies at the University of Utah, and the lead author of the study, offers one possible reason: “Doing dishes is gross. There is old, moldy food sitting in the sink. If you have kids, there is curdled milk in sippy cups that smells disgusting.” Additionally, unlike some other chores such as cooking or gardening, doing dishes well does not beget compliments, he observes: “What is there to say? ‘Oh, the silverware is so sparkly’?”.
Traditionally, women have shouldered full responsibility for chores that involve cleaning up after someone else: doing the laundry, cleaning the toilet, washing dishes.
Dishwashing is actually one of the tasks partners are most likely to take turns doing: Between 1999 and 2006, the share of couples who divvy up dishwashing responsibilities rose from 16 to 29 percent, according to the CCF report.
If a woman goes over to a friend’s house and sees a male partner handling or helping with the dishes, Carlson told me, she’s likely to feel worse about her own arrangement.
According to Carlson, that’s because a couple can do dishes as a team.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Fresh Air: ‘Doing Harm’ By Maya Dusenbery”

Fresh Air: ‘Doing Harm’ By Maya Dusenbery : Shots – Health News Journalist Maya Dusenbery argues that medicine has a “Systemic and unconscious bias” against women that is rooted in “What doctors, regardless of their own gender, are learning in medical schools.”
We still don’t know that women are necessarily adequately represented in all areas of research, because the NIH looks at the aggregate numbers, and the outside analyses that have been done show that women are still a little bit underrepresented.
Even though women are usually included in most studies today, it’s still not the norm to really analyze results by gender to actually see if there are differences between men and women.
Women are included, but we’re still not getting the knowledge we need about ways that their symptoms or responses to treatment might differ from men.
On why some medicine affects men and women differently – and how that results in women receiving excessive doses of most drugs.
So there’s been a concerted effort to go back and compare women’s experiences to men’s, which has led to the knowledge that women are more likely to have what are considered to be atypical symptoms.
One study found it was younger women – so women under 55 – were seven times more likely than the average patient to be sent home mid-heart attack.
So conditions like autoimmune diseases that really are marked by these subjective symptoms of pain and fatigue, I think, are very easy to dismiss in women.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The partisan gender gap among millennials is staggeringly large”

Women are more Democratic than men, and younger voters are more Democratic than older ones.
Among millennials, which Pew identifies as people born between 1981 and 1996, men lean toward Democrats by 8 percentage points – far and away a bigger tilt toward Democrats than older cohorts of men.
Millennial women favor Democrats by a staggeringly large 70-23 margin.
That means that even as millennial men are the most Democratic-friendly cohort of men, the millennial gender gap is also by far the largest of any cohort.
In the Silent Generation, women are 8 points more favorable to Democrats.
Among Gen-Xers, it’s 11 points, and among millennials, it’s 21 points.
That’s driven by what seems to be an explosive change in millennial women’s political sentiments over just the past two or three years even while most other groups’ views have stayed relatively stable.
It’s fair to say that while a certain amount of gender polarization is nothing new to the political system, the scale that we are now witnessing among younger people is unprecedented.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Equitable Maps Are More Accurate and Humane”

A team of OpenStreetMap users is working to draw new cartographic lines, making maps that more accurately-and equitably-reflect our space.
“Only a few people got to make maps, and they were carefully guarded, and they were not participatory.” That’s slowly changing, she said, thanks to democratizing projects like OpenStreetMap.
OSM is the self-proclaimed Wikipedia of maps: It’s a free and open-source sketch of the globe, created by a volunteer pool that essentially crowd-sources the map, tracing parts of the world that haven’t yet been logged.
There is one arena where women’s OSM involvement, specifically, is growing, however: within organizations like Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team and Missing Maps, which work to develop parts of the map most needed for humanitarian relief, or during natural disasters.
So in honor of International Women’s Day, Missing Maps organized about 20 feminist map-a-thons across the country, including one at the American Red Cross headquarters in downtown Washington, D.C., led by Levine along with a team of women volunteers.
They were joined at the Missing Maps event by fellow society member Ethan Casserino, a third-year at GW. “It wasn’t presented as a tech-y thing; more like service work,” said Kondratieff.
As a designer with DevelopmentSeed, a data technology group that is partnering with OSM to improve its maps, Ali Felski has been interviewing dozens of OSM users across the country about how they interact with the site.
An estimated 40 percent of the 5,000 students who take part in YouthMappers are female, and a quarter of their chapters have more than 50 percent participation, said Marcela Zeballos, a research associate and 2009 graduate of GW. The group also champions women’s empowerment initiatives like Let Girls Map, which runs from International Women’s Day in March to International Day of the Girl in October.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Dollars and Desperation Silencing #MeToo in Music”

The music world continues to project expectations that women are valued primarily as objects, not human beings: Hit music videos still feature women as little more than sexual accoutrements for their male stars, and female artists’ appearances remain a disproportionate focus of critical essays and reviews.
Little consolidated data is available about the gender breakdown of the American music industry, but Census Bureau data points to an imbalance: within the sound recording industry, for example, which includes record labels and publishing groups, women make up 28 percent of the workforce.
Following a series of mergers dating back to 1998, the “Big Six” major labels that once ruled the industry-Warner Music Group, EMI, PolyGram, Sony Music, MCA, and BMG-are today the “Big Three”: Sony BMG, Universal Music Group, and Warner Music Group.
Between 1999 and 2009, total revenue from US recorded music sales fell by 50 percent, which forced companies to diversify their income streams with sources like streaming services and music licensing deals, while navigating the simultaneous growth of the live event business, which now accounts for more than half of the industry’s overall revenue.
While the industry has consolidated-the major labels hold an estimated 69 percent of the $15.7 billion global recorded music market-the music business at large is also distinctly fragmented, a decentralized constellation of artists, labels, publishers, managers, and promoters, that amounts to an expanding network of peer relationships.
“The music industry, like the rest of the economy, has seen rapid growth in contract workers and freelancers in recent decades,” said Alan Kreuger, a Princeton economist and co-founder of the Music Industry Research Association.
Workers in the music industry told me that some smaller companies and labels they’d worked for did not have policies or resources in place specifically to address sexual misconduct.
Above all, it requires fostering workplace cultures that support the people, and not just the dollars, that define the American music industry.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Building better men: how we can begin to redefine masculinity”

We need to shift from an intervention mindset – trying to shift young men’s conceptions of masculinity after they’ve already been formed – to a prevention mindset in which we help boys develop healthier ideas about gender to start with.
Research suggests middle school could be an ideal time to inoculate boys against toxic masculinity.
Middle school boys’ ability to resist traditional masculine norms is relatively strong, but weakens when they get to high school.
Maine Boys to Men, a program that has long worked with high school boys, is developing a curriculum for middle school boys that teaches them to see and sidestep the rigid gender roles they’re already growing into.
MBTM adapted its high school curriculum for a middle school audience and tested it during the 2015-2016 academic year, reaching just over 500 boys in southern Maine.
The idea is simple: the group leader draws a big box on the chalkboard, and the boys brainstorm stereotypes of masculinity.
The completed visual serves as a jumping off point to discuss how confining traditional masculinity can be and how harmful to both boys and girls, both men and women.
Feedback from the middle school boys is almost universally positive, with most of them saying they’re going to change the way they talk to people or adjust their judgments about how others do gender.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The skin care wars, explained”

Writing about skin care used to be confined to beauty blogs and glossy magazines; now, it’s increasingly showing up at major mainstream outlets that don’t have a mandate to cover “Beauty” or “Women’s issues.” Jia Tolentino and Rachel Syme are writing about skin care for the New Yorker’s website.
Critical think pieces about skin care abound, and they tend to hit the same beats: Is skin care exploitative? Is it a waste of money? Is it misogynistic? Or is it the backlash against skin care that is truly misogynistic?
The rise of skin care coincides with the corporatization of self-care It would be disingenuous say that skin care was “Taken over” by corporations, because skin care in its modern form has always been corporate: It is inherently about putting money on your face, often at a huge markup.
As skin care and self-care became more and more intertwined in popular discourse, skin care marketers took note.
“An effective and efficient skin care routine is a therapeutic process that will help you feel your best. We believe in the power of skin care as a self-care ritual, and want to enable you to dedicate downtime to focus solely on yourself.”
Skin care is about having pristinely clear pores and perfect porcelain skin tone, and while women en masse are not stupid or bad for aspiring to those goals, it’s undeniable that setting those goals for women has made a lot of rich white men a whole lot of money.
Before embracing the language of self-care and wellness to sell their products, skin care corporations explicitly played on women’s insecurities: stop that blackhead, fight those wrinkles, kick that pimple’s butt because your skin is unacceptable as it is.
Beauty is labor, but our culture shames us whenever we acknowledge that fact The Outline’s “Skincare con” article argues that skin care is a modern scam, and that women who spend money on skin care are being cheated by massive corporations that offer nothing but snake oil.

The orginal article.