Summary of “How To Be Free From All Emotional Blocks And Fears”

Literally, you have designed every detail of your life to protect yourself from the fears and internal conflicts you aren’t willing to face.
You bury your childhood traumas, your fears, and your emotional insecurities.
Said Tony Robbins, “You always get out of life exactly what you tolerate.” You’ve learned to tolerate living with your fears and internal conflicts.
Rather than fixing them, they construct the most bizarre relationships and life to protect themselves from facing their fears or traumas.
You Are Not Your FearsThe first step in living a life of freedom is to realize that you are not your fears.
Herein lies why most people build their lives around their fears.
You can only do this by exposing yourself directly to your fears and emotional problems.
Build your entire life around your fears like most people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An iPad Pro 10.5″ Not Review”

After playing with the new iPad Pro 10.5″ for a few days, I am convinced that it’s fairly impossible to do a detailed review of it in its current state.
Last year, Apple’s Tim Cook said that “We believe that iPad is the perfect expression of the future of computing.” This year, that claim seems more ideologically sound than ever.
So instead of a full review today, I’m going to talk about some of the marquee features of the iPad and how Apple was able to execute on them.
Basically, this looks as sharp as the 9.7-inch iPad Pro – just bigger.
The camera hardware is the exact same package as in an iPhone 7, which is to say it’s the first time that a front and rear camera on an iPad has been on par with iPhone and quite good at that.
I wrote this piece entirely on the iPad Pro; aside from the 103 degree fever I’m running at the moment, it was painless.
With the iPad Pro, especially when it’s armed with iOS 11, it’s beginning to feel possible to see Apple in this world.
The iPad is a full-fledged computer, and you can argue against it but you’re going to increasingly sound like a contrarian.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A letter to my sons after watching Wonder Woman”

Wonder Woman is a pretty big deal, and it’s something many of us doubted we’d see in our lifetime: a good DC Comics movie.
There’s a lot going on here, and it’s something I think we should talk about, because I don’t want you to hear about Wonder Woman from the streets.
No, this isn’t how women feel watching Marvel films You know how the first chunk of the movie featured no men? It’s kind of tempting to think that uncomfortable feeling we both experienced is what women feel every time they watch a superhero movie with a mostly male cast.
Women don’t go to the movies expecting to see themselves in the heroes; they’ve spent their entire lives consuming pop culture that is meant to make white men like us feel good and powerful.
It’s important to examine our feelings, but just be aware this isn’t a magical window into what women feel watching the majority of superhero films.
Wonder Woman shows us a happy, healthy environment where we’re not needed for manual labor, war or sex.
Wonder Woman is set in 1918, and shows how little respect Diana is given once she enters London society.
Because Wonder Woman doesn’t have the luxury of being just a movie, and like everything else in this life it has to be twice as good to get the same amount of basic respect because a white guy isn’t the most visible character.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop procrastinating by adopting the five-minute rule”

“If you don’t want to do something, make a deal with yourself to do at least five minutes of it. After five minutes, you’ll end up doing the whole thing,” he recently told Axios when asked about his favorite life hack.
Systrom is hardly the first to promote the magic of the five-minute rule and its variations.
So the five-minute rule lowers that inhibition, lulling us into the idea that we can dip quickly into a project with no strings attached, according to Julia Moeller, a postdoctoral research associate at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence.
Our motivation to engage in an activity increases as costs decrease, says Moeller.
The true intrigue of the five-minute rule is why we persist beyond the allotted five minutes once we get started.
Gender differences disappear when students are surveyed about competency and anxiety during a math test-suggesting that female students’s expectations about their negative feelings toward math do not accurately predict their actual feelings while they are doing it.
In a state of flow, we become so immersed in an activity that we forget about our surroundings, making time feel as if it’s flying by.
After five minutes of intense work, a massive project may still be massive-but having overcome the initial obstacle of getting started, it will no longer seem impossible.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Change Your Life in 5 Seconds. Yes, 5 Seconds”

In 2008, author, entrepreneur, and award-winning television commentator Mel Robbins was out of work and out of money and running out of options.
“You talk about not feeling motivated?” Robbins asks in this interview.
They’re based on emotion, on how a person feels about the action.
“Most of the time when you have stuff that you need to do, you’re not going to feel like doing it. And it’s a major mistake to sit around and think that you need to be motivated first, and it’s an even bigger mistake to think that at some point you will feel like doing it,” Robbins said.
After stumbling across a television commercial with the image of a rocket launching, Robbins decided she would launch herself out of bed the very next day with the same gusto and determination.
“We like to think we make decisions based on logic, based on what’s best for our businesses,” Robbins said.
“It turns out that inside that five-second window, your entire life and business, everything changes if you wake up and take control of that moment right before you’re about to make a decision,” Robbins said.
“In life, there is going to be stuff that happens to you. And in business, for sure,” Robbins said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Live On Purpose and Maximize Every Day”

On days I’ve actually lived my purpose, I leave my work more energized than before I started.
One day per week, take 10-30 minutes reflecting on your past six days.
Weekly goals > Daily to-do’s”Most people overestimate what they can do in a day, and underestimate what they can do in a month. We overestimate what we can do in a year, and underestimate what we can accomplish in a decade.” - Matthew Kelly.
In reality, it’s quite easy to have one good day.
You could do the same thing every day and not get any better.
Just like your weekly planning sessions, every three months spend a few hours or even a full day reflecting on your previous three months.
You are one great day away from having a breakthrough.
Regardless of how you feel during the experience, you will feel hope and optimism when you’re done.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The complexity of social problems is outsmarting the human brain”

The doctor further explains that everyone with the disease tests positive, but that there is a 5 per cent false-positive rate.
Does your 2 per cent calculation feel intuitively correct, or does knowing you tested positive make you feel that the chances of getting the disease must be higher? For those who didn’t get the right answer, see how you feel about the following explanation.
If you test 1,000 people, a 5 per cent false-positive rate means that 50 healthy people tested positive.
If the disease occurs once per 1,000 people, one per 1,000 tested will have a true positive.
51 of 1,000 people will test positive, of which 50 will be false positives and one will be a true positive for an approximate 2 per cent likelihood rate Does this explanation both make sense and feel correct?
The national average is 1,010, with more than 90 per cent scoring lower than the bottom 25 per cent at Cornell.
With the Harvard test question, I can readily work out a back-of-the-envelope determination of a 2 per cent probability of having the neurological disease, yet cannot shake a gut feeling that the likelihood is much higher.
Presently, 42 per cent of Americans believe that God created humans within the past 10,000 years.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I write on the internet. I’m sorry.”

Do you lie awake in bed more often these days, unable to sleep, scrolling through Facebook or Twitter on your phone, trying to ignore signs of stress? Perhaps a faint taste of acid in your mouth? Do you have a gnawing fear that dark alliances are forming among your countrymen and conspiring against you, and everyone you like and everyone like you? Does it make you want to spend more money, or write yourself more reminders to do “Self-care?” Maybe you suspect that if anyone else cares about your self it is only to notice that deep down you’re just as much of a hateful loser as they are?
You see, I’m paid to write about politics and culture on the internet.
Conservatives look out on the world and see a Republican Party that can win elections but can’t change the culture.
One of the main reasons they feel like this is because of the internet, particularly social media’s effect on the way news is created and delivered to you.
The people who write about politics on the internet often get a half dozen vile messages before lunch, informing them that they should be drawn and quartered, along with their birth parents and pets, preferably.
Everyone participates in the culture, even if they don’t want to participate.
Any attempt to make visible the culture is partly doomed to failure, because it moves and shifts all the time, being governed by the desires and prejudices and terrors of all its members and what they want each other and the world in general to believe about them.
The same is true of everyone else, in their relationships with the culture, so the result is something we cannot even begin to describe but at best can acquire an intuitive sense of.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Let Go of the Learning Baggage”

Why? In part, because we layer our social values on top and end up with a hot mess of guilt and fear that stymies the learning process.
We can’t maximize the time we spend learning because our feelings about what we ‘should’ be doing get in the way.
If we are learning for work, then in our brains learning = work.
If we are not learning, then we are not working.
Can we change how we approach learning, letting go of the guilt associated with not being visibly active, and embrace what seems counter-intuitive?
Barbara Oakley explains in A Mind for Numbers: How to Excel at Math and Science that our brain has two general modes of thinking – ‘focused’ and ‘diffuse’ – and both of these are valuable and required in the learning process.
So if we are doing any of these ‘play’ activities at work, which are invisible in terms of their contribution to the learning process, we feel guilty because we don’t believe we are doing what we get paid to do.
If you aren’t the CEO or the VP of HR, you can’t magic a policy that says ‘all employees shall do something meaningful away from their desks each day and won’t be judged for it’, so what can you do to learn better at work? Find a way to let go of the guilt baggage when you invest in proven, effective learning techniques that are out of sync with your corporate culture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Overcome Resistance to Change with Two Conversations”

The biggest hurdle to effective organizational change is people.
In our work of leading change in higher education and teaching students and executives about the change management process, we’ve gained a deep understanding of why resistance happens and what leaders can do to overcome it.
A second universal source of resistance is the human need for respect, which frequently heightens during periods of change.
Motivating true change requires unhurried, face-to-face, one-on-one conversation.
If a specific work group or person is very important to your organization’s future, and they are resisting needed change, you have to take the time to talk with them in person, and to do it under as little time pressure as possible.
In the second conversation, your goal is to make clear that you have reflected on what you heard; to outline what will be different, or not, in your approach to the change based on that conversation; and to explain why.
We recommend at least two days, depending on the scale of the change.
Effective change management is critical to the vitality and progress of every organization.

The orginal article.