Summary of “What Data Scientists Should Know About Hiring, Sharing, and Collaborating”

In this post we summarize some of our most recent and favorite answers on Quora to questions from the community about hiring junior data scientists, sharing work with the public, and collaborating.
“What do you look for when hiring an entry-level data scientist? Would a master’s in Data Science or a bootcamp be beneficial?”.
What’s the best way for data scientists to share their work?
Considering the deeply technical nature of the work, and the many ways in which an analysis can go awry, it can feel like an especially daunting task to share one’s work as a data scientist.
A recent article by Emma Walker, Data Scientist at Qriously, even called communication the “Critical skill” many data scientists are missing.
What are best practices for collaboration between data scientists?
Once a data scientist had their work noticed, and once they’ve been hired as a data scientist at an organization, the truism that “Data science is a team sport” will become a daily reality.
It’s exciting to discuss the latest new approach or algorithm, but there are many interesting questions beginning to come out surrounding the people, processes, and careers of data scientists.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Corporate Values Get Hijacked and Misused”

The painful result of widespread misuse of company values, according to one major study, is that only 23% of U.S. employees strongly agree that they can apply their organization’s values to their work every day, and only 27% “Believe in” their organization’s values.
Another comprehensive study based on more than 1,000 firms in the Great Places to Work database reveals a strong correlation between corporate financial performance and the extent to which employees believe their company’s espoused values are practiced.
Values hold the power to drive meaningful differences in performance by shaping a culture, and when misused, can undermine performance with toxic force.
When these three conditions aren’t present, values can get hijacked and misused.
In one organization, the alleged commitment to “Values accountability” became so twisted that statements like “She’s not aligned with our values” or “I can’t support that decision because I don’t see how it reflects the values” became so reflexive that they shut down honest conversation.
In this company’s case, senior leaders who were criticized for not modeling the values quickly ousted their accusers for “Not being team players.” The very values intended to unify and inspire the culture had turned it into a poisonous gang rivalry.
People fill workshops where executives tell heartwarming stories about how the values have shaped their careers and will distinguish their organization in the future.
A company’s values must reflect what makes it uniquely successful, conveying to employees, “This is what it takes to succeed here.” Processes like strategy, selection, rewards, performance management, and resource allocation must have values woven deeply into them with undeniable consistency between actions and words.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Question Isn’t Why Wage Growth Is So Low. It’s Why It’s So High.”

Economic theory tells us that when workers are scarce, employers have to raise wages, though it hasn’t always worked out that way: Wage growth underperformed productivity and inflation during some periods of low joblessness, including in the mid-1980s and mid-2000s.
Economists at Goldman Sachs recently studied which factors drive wage trends in 10 major economies, and identified low productivity growth as the main culprit behind the recent weakness in wage numbers around the world.
“Some of it is a result of the minimum wage, but some of it is simply because there are areas in the country where employment levels are strong.”
The wage question quickly leads us into more difficult economic questions.
This is particularly important if, as our analysis of wage trends suggests, low productivity growth is the culprit behind Americans’ small inflation-adjusted pay increases during the last few years.
The causation could go in other directions, however: Wage growth, or the lack of it, might affect innovation and productivity.
Some left-of-center economists are exploring whether a higher minimum wage or a stronger social welfare system might increase productivity growth and the supply of labor.
Perhaps we can at least ask better questions: The real mystery isn’t why wage growth is so low, but why productivity is so low.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hoping to stretch pensions, Americans move to Ecuador, Canada, Mexico, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Panama, Nicaragua and Costa Rica”

Best known for the Galapagos and providing asylum in its London embassy to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, Ecuador is home to 2,850 retirees receiving benefits, according to the U.S. government.
The city of Cuenca recently conducted a census that found its municipality alone was home to almost 10,000 foreign retirees, most of them Americans from Texas and Florida.
The city is trying to combat local fears that the retirees are both driving up land prices and bleeding the public healthcare system, she said.
A full 73 percent of the retirees in Cuenca, according to the city’s survey, said they found out about the city via “Best of” rankings online.
If there is a real driving force for retirees, it’s healthcare.
Cuenca’s survey of retirees found that most were either paying for healthcare out-of-pocket or had private healthcare.
Crespo, the city official, said the retirees are pumping money into the economy, but there are growing concerns over how they might be affecting the healthcare system.
Congresswoman Soliz said the legislature is planning on doing a comprehensive study of how foreign retirees might be straining public resources.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 35 words you’re getting wrong”

Inchoate/Incoherent “Inchoate” describes something not ready to be judged “Incoherent”, which means “Lacking clarity”.
It does catch fire as easily as anything flammable, because the two words mean the same.
Judicial/Judicious Judicial means “Connected with a court of law”; judicious means “Wise”.
Momentarily You have to hope the pilot and stewards are lying when they say: “We will be in the air momentarily.” That does not mean: “We will be in the air in a few minutes.” It means: “We will be in the air for a moment.” That is strictly speaking, of course, but what is the point of having words if they mean nothing?
Regalia Regal means “Of or by kings”, and regalia means “The insignia of royalty”.
Transpire Wrongly used to mean, merely, “Happen”.
Viable/Feasible “Viable” means capable of independent life – a viable foetus or seed or, figuratively, in the sense of “Capable of succeeding”, a candidate.
Virtually Incorrectly used to mean “Nearly all”; eg: “Virtually all the chocolates were eaten.” “Virtually” is useful for an imprecise description that is more or less right, close enough, as good as.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Retirement savings: The world is sitting on a $400 trillion financial time bomb”

The World Economic Forum predicts that by 2050 the world will face a $400 trillion shortfall in retirement savings.
The WEF defines a shortfall as anything less than what’s required to provide 70% of a person’s pre-retirement income via public pensions and private savings.
It is followed by China’s $119 trillion shortfall.
Much of the massive shortfall is baked into retirement systems; setups in which nobody, neither individuals nor the government, saves enough.
Putting money aside for retirement now confers the benefit of compound interest and provides certainty to financial markets that fear ballooning government debts.
If the shortfall proves bigger than expected, the costs of waiting will be larger, too.
The report offers several suggestions to address the shortfall.
Most include ways to boost individual saving by offering retirement accounts to a wider population and expanding financial literacy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The opioid crisis changed how doctors think about pain”

Understanding how opioids became so ubiquitous in America requires understanding a fundamental shift that happened 30 years ago in how doctors thought about pain itself.
The ensuing opioid addiction crisis has now forced doctors to rethink some very fundamental pillars of how they practice medicine: How much can they do to treat pain? Were they right to consider it a vital sign? How much should they do? Is it more ethical to ask patients to live with pain when they know relieving pain can have horrific side effects?
A 1995 editorial in the Journal of Clinical Oncology lamented the “Numerous barriers that have prevent patients from receiving effective pain treatment.” It cited studies finding that oncologists constantly underestimate their patients’ pain, and underprescribe pain relievers as a result.
In November 2015, two pain doctors from the University of Washington wrote a controversial article in the New England Journal of Medicine arguing that doctors need to think less about pain levels entirely.
“If you focus just on pain intensity, the tendency is just to use opioids, because opioids are the only thing that will reduce pain so immediately.”
The measure of good treatment, they argued, wasn’t getting rid of pain – it was getting people back to the activities that pain prevented.
“The goal of pain relief should be 30% to 55% improvement, and therefore the patient should be expecting tolerable pain levels, not 0 pain levels,” Harvard surgeon Haytham Kaafarani and his co-authors argued.
Instead of focusing on fixing their pain, he works with them to figure out how they can get back to the valuable activities in their life even if their chronic pain persists.

The orginal article.

Summary of “deadspin-quote-carrot-aligned-w-bgr-2”

It’s not as colorful or Insta-friendly as the Bullet Journal, and although various apps have claimed to “Work with GTD,” they’ve all fallen slightly short-because, at its core, GTD is analog.
It’s a system that works less well if you let Gmail automatically sort your email into categories, or if you let an app scan your docs to pull out to-dos or calendar items, since the whole point of GTD is that you are actively tracking and collecting every task, responsibility, or concern that comes your way.
Getting Things Done, or GTD, is a system for getting organized and staying productive.
I can’t remember whether I read Gina Trapani’s Lifehacker post on “Simplified GTD” before or after I discovered Merlin Mann’s 43 Folders, but a lot of people were talking about GTD back in 2007, and since I had just started at the first office job that required me to take on responsibilities beyond “Answer the phones,” I was ready for it.
GTD works because it allows you to funnel all of your outstanding responsibilities into one place.
I’ve tried a number of productivity apps and systems since starting GTD. I downloaded and deleted Remember the Milk more than once; it was good, but I could track and organize tasks much more quickly on my spreadsheet.
For a while I tried offloading projects to a Kanban Chart, and while it was fun to move sticky notes around, I was just recreating data that I already had in my master GTD list-and I didn’t need two lists.
I’ve been practicing GTD for roughly ten years now.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Raise Successful Kids? Science Says Read to Them Like This”

It has to do with the way we read to children when they’re very young.
The Cincinnati study is best viewed as the latest of a series of recent research results that suggest that the sooner parents engage kids in a “Participatory reading style”, the more cognitive benefits they’ll see as a result.
In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics began advising parents to read to their children from the earliest age in infancy.
The researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan the brains of 22 four-year-old girls while their mothers read to them.
Those whose mothers read to them in an engaging way-also known as “Dialogic reading”-had greater activity in the parts of the brain where “Cognitive skill acquisition and refinement via connection to language” occur.
So what is “Dialogic reading” exactly? In sum, it means a reading experience that is more of a dialogue than a one-way recitation.
It means engaging children, and making them become more than passive listeners while you read to them.
In other words, the fact that the girls whose mothers read to them in a more engaging and dialogic manner had brain scans suggesting greater activity doesn’t necessarily mean that the reading style was the root cause of the greater activity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Interracial Love Is Saving America”

As Chief Justice Earl Warren wrote in the unanimous Loving opinion, such laws were an instrument of “White Supremacy” – the first time the Supreme Court used those words to name what the Civil War and the 14th Amendment should have defeated.
Whites with reduced prejudice, in turn, have a worldview similar to that of many minorities; that is, they support policies designed to reduce racial inequality.
A small study of whites married to blacks documented increased understanding of racism.
This transition from blindness to sight, from anxiety to familiarity, is a process of acquiring “Cultural dexterity.” Love can make people do uncomfortable things, like meeting a black lover’s family and being the only white person in the room.
Eventually, a critical mass of white people will accept the loss of the centrality of whiteness.
When enough whites can accept being one voice among many in a robust democracy, politics in America could finally become functional.
Increased proximity most likely expanded white people’s knowledge of what nonwhite people face.
Activists for #BlackLives, for example, have more allies than they might imagine; about 60 percent of whites under 30 agree with the group’s critique of law enforcement.

The orginal article.