Summary of “The Winners and Losers From Comic-Con 2017”

Trailers for basically everything premiered this past weekend at Comic-Con 2017: a newer, brighter promo for Justice League, a Walking Dead trailer featuring Rick with an old-man beard, and even teasers for multiple Nickelodeon revival projects.
The bulk of the lengthy trailer for Season 8 concerns the advent of all-out war between Negan’s Saviors and the militia formed from the union of Alexandria, the Hilltop, and the Kingdom, but the most revealing moment occurs in the final few seconds, when an older, white-bearded Rick awakens in bed, looking like a Just for Men “Before” photo.
The Stranger Things cast came to Comic-Con like conquering heroes, and their Season 2 trailer gives no indication that the show will wilt in the face of expectations as steep as any awaiting the return of a series not named Game of Thrones.
The first action that we see in the trailer shows Bernard, with extremely symbolic flies crawling all over him, staring at what looks to be a tiger.
Since literally zero people, even at Comic-Con, are going to see Pacific Rim for “Plot” or “Character motivation,” the only conclusion I can draw is that none of the fight scenes have been CGI’d yet, but some poor creative team still had to make a trailer for Comic-Con.Winner: ‘Rocko’s Modern Life: Static Cling’Lindbergh: The original Rocko’s Modern Life used its cartoon visuals and kid-friendly slapstick as a delivery system for satire of America’s materialistic, corporate culture, which hasn’t grown any less ripe for ribbing in the decades since the show went off the air.
Loser: Trailers in GeneralAndrew Gruttadaro: The worst trend in movie trailers is not the dark cover of a popular song from the ’70s, or the canned, ominous establishing shot of a city accompanied by a voice-over - it’s the teaser for the trailer within the trailer.
I’m sure several other trailers had them as well, but I decided to stop counting because so many trailers had already stolen so many seconds of my life.
What are we doing here? Running ads for a movie trailer inside that same movie trailer? Interesting strategy - maybe grocery stores should start training their cashiers to advertise potato chips after you’ve already bought them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Simpsons’ Planet of the Apes Musical: An Oral History”

What I do know is when you mention anything about Planet of the Apes to a fan of the show, their mind will instantly jump to the words “Dr. Zauis, Dr. Zauis.” Others will happily sing the whole dang score for you.
The memory of the show’s fictional Planet of the Apes musical has lasted the 21 years since it aired as part of the episode “A Fish Called Selma” in season seven.
The musical, officially titled Stop the Planet of the Apes.
“But once every few months, like the time we wrote the musical version of The Planet of the Apes, we really had a blast. I cried with laughter.” The bit has so many disparate parts – ’80s Austrian-pop parody, old-school-musical homage, Planet of the Apes, break-dancing, old vaudeville-style jokes – but in the hands of The Simpsons and its writers, it works.
Josh Weinstein: I’ll tell you something – I didn’t see Planet of the Apes until like five years ago.
Between the three of us, we constantly say things like, “Thank you, Amadeus.” After we came up with the idea of a Planet of the Apes musical, I said randomly, “Thank you, Dr. Zaius.” Maybe somebody else may have said it, so I don’t want to claim full credit for it, but somebody said it like the “Rock Me, Amadeus” song, and then it clicked in and people started pitching lyrics.
Weinstein: I’m not well-versed in musicals, but say, something with a love story like Oklahoma!, you’d expect the ending to be, “I love you, Laurie!” but it’s Planet of the Apes! So that’s partially the joke.
Ledesma: To bring it all the way forward now to last year, when we did our VR couch gag, which was an extended parody of Planet of the Apes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A leading happiness researcher says we’re giving our kids bad advice about how to succeed in life”

Here are a few of the most damaging things many of us are currently teaching our children about success, and what to teach them instead. What we tell our kids: Focus on the future.
Children do better, and feel happier, if they are learn how to stay in the present moment.
Studies even suggest that happiness makes you 12% more productive.
The way we conduct our lives as adults often communicates to children that stress is an unavoidable part of leading a successful life.
It’s no surprise that research shows that children whose parents are dealing with burnout at work are more likely than their peers to experience burnout at school.
These tools help children learn to tap into their parasympathetic “Rest and digest” nervous system.
Giving your kids downtime will help them to be more creative and innovative.
So it’s important to encourage children’s natural instincts to care about other people’s feelings and learn to put themselves in other people’s shoes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In the age of streaming TV, who needs title sequences?”

Until Tony Soprano took viewers on a strange journey over the New Jersey Turnpike for the very first time in 1999, television title sequences were mostly straightforward affairs.
Title sequences can feel like a vestigial nuisance for viewers who are four episodes into a season-long binge At the same time, the way we consume TV shows has also changed dramatically.
Something like the recent title sequence for Stranger Things, which paid homage to the opening sequences of Altered States and The Dead Zone, would have been created digitally and then “Filmed out,” or transferred to film which was processed to gauge the final effect.
Patrick Clair, who works with Elastic, is arguably the modern master of television title sequences.
Clair’s latest title for American Gods opens with a jittery blitz of visuals that reminded me, the first time I watched it, of a mashup between Coney Island, a Jewish synagogue, and the Berlin nightclub Berghain, filmed and edited by a tech-savvy millennial with ADHD. A medusa with fiber-optic hair, a Buddha confettied with pills, a crucified astronaut – the sequence says a hundred things simultaneously, mainlining themes and world views directly into your brain.
Clair, for one, is skeptical of this: “At the end of the day, the title sequence doesn’t mean much without the very dense and complex drama that follows.” And the trend for increasingly extravagant openers is beginning to raise eyebrows in some other corners of the industry, too.
Will Perkins, an editor at Art of the Title, says, “It’s become a sort of title sequence arms race. If every show on television has a flashy title sequence, what can they do to set themselves apart? They’re going to have to keep one-upping each other with these increasingly elaborate opening credits just to compete at that level. I think that might, at some point, encourage viewers to hit the ‘skip credits’ button.” Actually, a few shows are already skipping the credits automatically: most recently The Handmaid’s Tale, which used nothing but a brief title card flash.
In 2016, the producers behind American Horror Story decided to drop the show’s famously evocative opener for AHS: Roanoke, perhaps because a slickly produced title sequence conflicted with the season’s documentary aesthetic of found footage, reenactments, and “Real” interviews.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Game of Thrones: Inside the World’s Most Popular Show”

Thrones, a scrappy upstart launched by two TV novices in 2011, will finish its run as the biggest and most popular show in the world.
Since it’s the most pirated show ever, millions more watch it in ways unaccounted for.
It’s the farthest-reaching show out there-not to mention the most obsessed-about.
HBO bought the idea and handed the reins to Benioff and Weiss, making them showrunners who’d never run a show before.
She’s thought through every element of her character including the incestuous relationship with Jaime that provided the show its first narrative jolt.
According to the logic of the show, the plot gave her character a reason to seek revenge and power of her own.
Even if Benioff and Weiss don’t always admit it, the show has changed.
The last new Thrones novel came out in 2011, the year the show began.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The One Big Reason Why BuzzFeed Needs to Break Into TV”

NBC’s Wilshire Studios is developing a pilot based on a BuzzFeed web show, The Try Guys, in which four gamy fellows perform outlandish stunts.
“You’re going to have shows emerge from the primordial soup of viral content that BuzzFeed is doing,” Peretti says.
In 2012, BuzzFeed bought his eponymous social gaming and video startup and hired him to build a studio and team of video producers in L.A. In his early days at BuzzFeed, Frank would pitch ideas so absurd that employees didn’t think he was serious.
BuzzFeed believes TV show and movie development could make up a third of total revenue in a few years.
One of the more successful campaigns was a series of videos for Purina, including an old cat offering sage advice to a kitten in a voice that could be a parody of how a wizened NBC executive might talk to a young BuzzFeed producer.
BuzzFeed executives say their data-heavy web operations combined with the NBC buddy system will ultimately give them an advantage over the competition.
For the type of reality shows that BuzzFeed and NBC are developing, basic cable networks typically pay about $350,000 per half-hour episode or $500,000 per hourlong episode, one Hollywood executive says.
In the meantime, BuzzFeed is producing a spinoff featuring nonfood experiences and sees potential in customizing the show for international audiences.

The orginal article.

Summary of “HGTV’s hidden dark side”

“We weren’t particularly handy, but we’d seen all the home reno shows… How hard could it be?” wrote Jheon.
Two days later, Jheon emailed a response to the Toronto Star’s Metro section: “I understand why the story and my insensitive descriptions triggered anger around real issues of affordable housing, homelessness and more. I’m going to take some time to reflect on everything that has happened.” What seems intended to have been a zany tale of what happens when your home improvement TV show fantasies don’t go quite as planned didn’t go quite as planned.
Just look at some of the most popular shows about homes on television right now.
Shows like HGTV’s House Hunters and Flip or Flop and DIY Network’s Kitchen Crashers would likely lose their loyal viewerships if they explored what their audiences may already know to be true: For many people, a dream home is a home that you can own in the first place.
How else could a network mostly about home ownership and investment have been the third most popular channel in 2016, at a time when the national home ownership rate was at its lowest since the 1965 that year and an estimated 2.7 million people faced eviction the year prior.
HGTV will always be walking a fine line between making dream home living feel accessible and bumping up against the reasons why it is not.
Home renovation shows in particular – including Fixer Upper, Love It or List It, Rehab Addict, and House Hunters Renovation – have found success at the network.
As long as housing instability and homelessness continue to be national crises, HGTV will always be walking a fine line between making dream home living feel accessible and bumping up against the reasons why it is not.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Leftovers is one of the best TV shows ever made”

The feeling The Leftovers had evoked in me persisted.
Inevitably, there will be other TV shows that make me feel this way.
The Leftovers, to me, is one of the best TV shows that ever there was, and I think I can tell you why, hopefully without spoiling too much.
What made The Leftovers special – and what most of my favorite TV shows have in common, come to think of it – is that it forced you to open that door and leave it that way permanently.
The Leftovers is the first TV show I can think of that actively engages with a world where the uncertainty that is core to simply being alive has caused a lot of us to carve out our own completely separate experiences of reality.
It’s also the season that best underlines why The Leftovers is one of the definitive TV shows of this era, a show about how poorly human beings react when they realize their own agency is a joke.
Once you get to seasons two and three, The Leftovers suggests its own sorts of answers The common gripe against The Leftovers, especially with regard to its first season, is that it’s too depressing, too grief-stricken.
The Leftovers worked so well because it focused not on the flood, but on the Ark, on the people left aboard, watching the skies for a sign of something new.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Night Court was the black sheep of NBC’s sitcom dynasty · 100 Episodes · The A.V. Club”

In 100 Episodes, The A.V. Club examines the shows that made it to that number, considering both how they advanced and reflected the medium and what contributed to their popularity and/or longevity.
This entry covers Night Court, which ran for nine seasons and 193 episodes between 1984 and 1992, concluding 25 years ago today.
Night Court’s legal hijinks took time to catch on, but the show’s fortunes were vastly improved when it joined a Thursday-night lineup that had a touch of the familiar, and just a little bit of high-concept.
Fortunately for the network, The Cosby Show was not the type of sitcom that needed time to get started.
Larroquette wasn’t exaggerating about the show’s content: On Night Court, Harry greets his new colleagues with a bazooka of spring-loaded snakes and Dan’s prowess in the courtroom and bedroom required wild gesticulations from Larroquette.
The people of Night Court were essentially cartoon characters, and by the time the show was experiencing its creative decline, they were prosecuting actual cartoon characters: The final “Day In The Life” installment infamously featured a punchline involving an animated Wile E. Coyote.
Charles Robinson’s Mac was the show’s second court clerk; Marsha Warfield came into the bailiff’s position following the deaths of Selma Diamond and Florence Halop.
Wackiness ultimately subsumed Night Court, but for a while, it and more cultishly adored sitcoms like It’s Garry Shandling’s Show and Sledge Hammer! made more room for weird in primetime comedy.
The setup smacks of mockery, and 30 Rock certainly doesn’t pull its punches where Night Court’s creative valleys are concerned: One of the episode’s best jokes is a cutaway to Jenna Maroney in the fictional guise of Sparky Monroe, Night Court’s “Werewolf lawyer.” But “The One With The Cast Of Night Court” kids because it cares, pulling the Friends/Night Court switcheroo while showing affection for both series.
Night Court, Friends, and 30 Rock are all part of a comedy legacy at NBC, two-and-a-half decades of shows that pulled sitcoms back from the brink and briefly made the Peacock the most powerful name in network television.

The orginal article.