Summary of “Develop Resiliency: How to Move Towards Your Fears”

How very human, how very loving, to protect ourselves!
Unfortunately that tendency to avoid fears is exactly what limits us.
We avoid our fear of pain, humiliation, anxiety, looking stupid, failing and we develop all kinds of ways to protect ourselves, from walling ourselves off from danger and being overwhelmed, to avoiding difficult conversations, difficult projects, and any situations where we might flop on our faces.
How can we connect with others in an intimate way if we avoid being vulnerable? How can we become more loving in our relationships if we avoid putting our pride aside and having those scary conversations?
How can we ever push into a new project, start a new business, pursue what we love if we constantly put it off for fear of looking like an idiot?
How can we learn anything if we look for certainty and avoid uncertainty? You can’t learn chess without playing a bunch of games and losing them so we avoid real learning and just read about it.
When you are feeling afraid of going to a social event, move towards that fear.
It’s where you’ll learn, and love, and connect, and become free of all your old limitations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hey Higher Ed, Why Not Focus On Teaching?”

His solution: Systemically improve teaching through methods that have become known as active learning.
People doing research in this area, like myself, we measure and we just see that the learning that takes place is really minimal, and then if you dig into the way the brain processes and learns, it’s pretty clear why it’s so minimal.
It’s not really connected to how much the students are learning.
You write about the Science Education Initiative and trying to improve undergraduate teaching through active learning techniques.
Research-based, active learning is about teaching the thinking that you really want students to learn.
Are the active learning teaching techniques applicable as well to the humanities, among those teaching Shakespeare or art history, or for that matter, a K-12 classroom?
We have data on the fundamental learning processes, but I can’t claim to a history course like I can physics, and say, ‘this class learned this way, that class learned that way,’ and see, they learned twice as much in this class.
It’s just about good management to make sure people are really looking at what they are learning and best supporting their learning.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Ultimate Guide for Learning Any Skill Faster and Better”

Nowadays, productivity expert Tim Ferriss has popularized a modern approach to this rule for faster learning.
Ask yourself: What are the most important elements that yield the biggest return on investment? For example, if you’re learning a foreign language - what 20 percent of words are used 80 percent of the time?3.
Multitasking slows down your learning and inhibits your brain from performing at its highest function.
Change up your learning methodsReconsolidation - the process in which memories are recalled and modified with new knowledge - plays a pivotal role in strengthening skills and learning.
A Johns Hopkins study found that “If you perform a slightly modified version of a task you want to master, you actually learn more and faster than if you just keep practicing the exact same thing multiple times in a row.”
Prepare for the long gameWe’ve all experienced it - that moment when you run out of time, money, or motivation to keep learning something new and quit.
Seth Godin calls it “The dip” - when the honeymoon phase of learning a new skill wanes.
If you enjoyed reading this post, please recommend and share it to help others find it!Call to action:If you have any tips for learning faster and better, leave a comment or reach out to me on Twitter!

The orginal article.

Summary of “Every single Machine Learning course on the internet, ranked by your reviews”

What is machine learning? What is a workflow?A popular definition originates from Arthur Samuel in 1959: machine learning is a subfield of computer science that gives “Computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed.” In practice, this means developing computer programs that can make predictions based on data.
“Deep learning is a subfield of machine learning concerned with algorithms inspired by the structure and function of the brain called artificial neural networks.”- Jason Brownlee from Machine Learning MasteryAs would be expected, portions of some of the machine learning courses contain deep learning content.
Creative Applications of Deep Learning with TensorFlow by KadenzeNeural Networks for Machine Learning by the University of Toronto via CourseraDeep Learning A-Z™: Hands-On Artificial Neural Networksby Kirill Eremenko, Hadelin de Ponteves, and the SuperDataScience Team via UdemyRecommended prerequisitesSeveral courses listed below ask students to have prior programming, calculus, linear algebra, and statistics experience.
Our pick for the best machine learning course isMachine LearningStanford University’s Machine Learning on Coursera is the clear current winner in terms of ratings, reviews, and syllabus fit.
In the past, I’ve tried to teach machine learning using a large variety of different programming languages including C++, Java, Python, NumPy, and also Octave And what I’ve seen after having taught machine learning for almost a decade is that you learn much faster if you use Octave as your programming environment.
Machine Learning Engineer Nanodegree: Udacity’s flagship Machine Learning program, which features a best-in-class project review system and career support.
Learning From Data: “A real Caltech course, not a watered-down version.” Reviews note it is excellent for understanding machine learning theory.
Big Data: Statistical Inference and Machine Learning: A nice, brief exploratory machine learning course with a focus on big data.

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Summary of “Learning These 7 Tough Skills Will Immediately Improve Your Entire Life”

These essential skills are never taught in school, but they will pay dividends for your entire life.
“Anyone who stops learning is old whether at 20 or 80.Anyone who keeps learning stays strong.” - Henry Ford.
We often focus only on learning skills that are directly pertinent to our jobs during the busy workweek.
Wealthy and successful people, on the other hand, never stop reaching for new heights and learning new skills, even if a teacher or boss isn’t telling them to.
The ultra-successful know that there are some other skills outside of their job description that can also immensely improve their wealth and their life.
Without learning to manage your time, you let urgent tasks and other people control how you spend your life.
Even if you don’t want to follow his schedule, being aware of and prioritizing around your times of maximum productivity is a vital skill to learn.
If you have any skills to add to the list, I’d love to hear them!

The orginal article.

Summary of “Start earning a higher paycheck by mastering machine learning and data science – BGR”

This is a paid placement and if you buy something through this article or on the BGR Store we will receive compensation from retail partners.
Looking for a change in your career? Learn the modern data tools and techniques that could strengthen your resume and boost your qualifications.
The Machine Learning and Data Science eBook and Course Bundle can be yours for only $46. This bundle will teach you a whole new set of valuable skills.
You’ll learn about different kinds of software and applications that are changing the way corporate environments operate today.
With Ansible, an open source automation platform, you can automate tasks, deploy complete cloud environments, and a whole lot more.
With Python, you’ll better understand your data by mastering how to run basic algorithms and statistical models.
Learning all these important skills can greatly impact your or your company’s workflow.
The Machine Learning and Data Science eBook and Course Bundle will show you how for only $46..

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Summary of “How Elon Musk Learns Faster And Better Than Everyone Else”

Based on my review of Musk’s life and the academic literature related to learning and expertise, I’m convinced that we should ALL learn across multiple fields in order to increase our odds of breakthrough success.
Elon Musk is also good at a very specific type of learning that most others aren’t even aware of - learning transfer.
Learning transfer is taking what we learn in one context and applying it to another.
At the deepest level, what we can learn from Elon Musk’s story is that we shouldn’t accept the dogma that specialization is the best or only path toward career success and impact.
If we put in the time and learn core concepts across fields and always relate those concepts back to our life and the world, transferring between areas becomes much easier and faster.
As we build up a reservoir of “First principles” and associate those principles with different fields, we suddenly gain the superpower of being able to go into a new field we’ve never learned before, and quickly make unique contributions.
Understanding Elon’s learning superpowers helps us gain some insight into how he could go into an industry that has been around for more than 100 years and change the whole basis of how the field competes.
Want to take to learn like Musk? I created a free learning how to learn webinar you might like.

The orginal article.

Summary of “15 Essential Skills They Don’t Teach You In College”

Spend some time each day learning the skills in the graphic.
Learn how to fail so that failure turns into a beginning.
The value of your network increases linearly if you get to know more people, but exponentially if the people you know get to know and help eachother.
These skills are absolutely necessary for any kind of real-life success.
These skills will put you way ahead of any competition.
You can learn these skills on the job, or in online settings.
MINUS: people you can teach, to solidify your learning.
James Altucher is the author of the bestselling book Choose Yourself, editor at The Altucher Report and host of the popular podcast, The James Altucher Show, which takes you beyond business and entrepreneurship by exploring what it means to be human and achieve well-being in a world that is increasingly complicated.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Learn In 2 Days What Normally Takes 6 Months”

Research has found that self-directed learning is highly correlated with learning satisfaction.
Said Albert Einstein, “That is the way to learn the most, that when you are doing something with such enjoyment that you don’t notice that the time passes.”
Students at the MTC learn in a few weeks what takes most college students three or four years.
If you want to learn something quickly, you need to immerse yourself in that thing and immediately implement what you’re learning.
The fastest way to learn Spanish is by immersing yourself in a Spanish culture.
Get a Teacher”When the student is ready the teacher will appear. When the student is truly ready, the teacher will disappear.” - Lao Tzu.When you move beyond dabbling to full commitment, you’ll want to learn quickly.
In these two days, I learned more than I could’ve learned in six months on my own.
Learning something new is all about memory and how you use it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Career Retrospective-10 years working in tech”

Each time the computer has to choose an action, it’ll choose based on a probability model for the current state of the game.
As the computer wins and loses, it’ll increase the probabilities of each action it took when it won, and decrease the probabilities for each action it took when it lost.
With enough iterations, the computer goes through enough different combinations of circumstances that it can eventually figure out which of the individual actions were beneficial.
So using the SDK, and video feed collected by ASIMO, we could detect if the human working with ASIMO on a task was pleased or frustrated with the robot.
My favorite thing about working in this lab was all the interesting projects I’d see my coworkers doing.
It makes me feel like every weird tangent i’ve taken in my career path, had a purpose and brought me to the point where I’m combining two of my favorite things, art and technology, and getting to do that every day, with the purpose of making computer science more accessible and inclusive.
In thinking about the unifying theme of everything that I work on or do, why I do everything that I do-I was talking to a friend on twitter about why we got into computer science in the first place.
As a result of all of those experiences, a lot of that magic i used to feel about computers as a kid has disappeared for me.

The orginal article.