Summary of “The Loneliness of LeBron James”

Cleveland’s defense, which has been questionable all season, was to blame: LeBron and company couldn’t figure out how to guard Stephen Curry at the three-point line-the site of so much of his freewheeling demolition-and simultaneously pay attention to the painted area near the net.
Once, on the way to her seat, she took a long, ostentatious bow in LeBron’s direction-her long-standing appreciation of the King is well documented-then stood for a moment, until someone behind her shouted for her to sit down.
LeBron is surely hoping for a different kind of intervention-divine, preferably.
LeBron’s characteristic excellence notwithstanding-he is averaging a triple-double in the finals-the proceedings have been a snooze, and LeBron’s exploits, so far, a futile exercise.
Despite his incredible gifts, and attendant laurels of appreciation, there has always been something of the Man of Sorrows about LeBron.
This is not-contra the writer and T.V. bombast Jason Whitlock-to label LeBron a “Victim” but rather, simply, to observe that his accomplishments have never fully concealed the vulnerability that seems essential to his character.
Unlike with Durant, we always see LeBron’s effort-mental, physical, societal, etc.
The incident, which prompted Whitlock’s ridiculous criticism of LeBron, is the latest in a series of sadly timely real-world intrusions into the N.B.A. in recent years.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Steph Curry and Kevin Durant are literally wearing out NBA nets”

With Fraser near the bucket, Durant and Curry today take turns making the net dance to and fro, one after the other, Fraser rifling the ball back to them.
Nearby, a swarm of media surrounds Warriors head coach Steve Kerr; soon after, Kerr will retire to a nearby chair facing the court and train his blue eyes on that very net, which is now, finally, still, with Durant and Curry having clocked out, their damage done.
Over in Oakland, on the goal where Durant and Curry drill endless jumpers, they have to change the net out about every few weeks, estimates Eric Housen, the Warriors’ longtime equipment manager.
Nets are manufactured year-round and, from China, they journey to Spalding’s facility in Jefferson, Iowa, where they ship official on-court gear to all 30 NBA teams.
League rules stipulate that nets at arenas must be changed by every seventh home game, at a minimum, and that worn nets should be replaced immediately, though some arenas do so often – at Oracle Arena the nets are changed every game.
Spalding once made nets with nylon, an industry standard – hence the colloquial, “Nothing but nylon” – but players kept hanging on them to stretch, particularly during the national anthem not long before tipoff, and it would stretch the nets out, which didn’t look as good, so Spalding made a switch.
Spalding’s NBA nets feature what’s called an “Anti-whip” design, i.e. their tips contain polypropylene for extra strength so they don’t follow that exact motion that Kerr so adores.
So it is that today, after practice, after a few swishes more have poured in, Curry pauses on the right wing, looks at the basket and asks aloud to no one in particular, “Brand new net?” And indeed it is: crisp, bone-white, intact and installed that very morning by Housen, who dipped into the stash of 100 nets that he orders in bulk at the start of the season and can switch out in a couple minutes flat, because he has done this a time or two.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Zach Lowe on Golden State Warriors forgiving Draymond Green”

Draymond Green sat along the sidelines this week at Quicken Loans Arena and pointed his right index finger at the spot where it happened – where everything about the 2016 NBA Finals, and maybe about the next decade of NBA history, changed in a blur of angry limbs.
That play, of course, was Green swiping at LeBron James’ groin as the world’s best player stepped over him in an act Green and his team viewed as an intentional, emasculating taunt.
The resulting flagrant foul mandated Green be suspended from Game 5 in Oakland.
To a man, the Warriors are sure they would have clinched the title in Game 5 at home had Green been available.
Green apologized, and the Warriors got past it, quickly.
Green learned to tread the line, and the Warriors are about to assume the throne again.
The Warriors list compassion as one of their core values, and they used it to digest what Green had done.
The core players had no choice but to forgive and forget; most of them were under contract for the next season and beyond, and Green wasn’t going anywhere.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Win or Lose, LeBron Stays the King”

Here is a big, and maybe even controversial question: Do these Finals even matter for LeBron James? More accurately: Do these Finals even matter to the way that we process the idea of LeBron James?
In the long term I suspect that the answer is no, these Finals do not matter for LeBron James.
Let me state it more plainly: LeBron James is the most important person in the Finals.
“Jordan never breathed life into an 0-2 corpse in the Finals before,” they would say, and before they could finish saying the other side would yell, “JORDAN WAS NEVER DOWN 2-0 IN AN NBA FINALS AND IN FACT, GUESS WHAT? JORDAN NEVER EVEN PLAYED IN A FINALS GAME 7, SO DO SOME RESEARCH, YOU STUPID IDIOT,” because that is the only hurdle LeBron has left to clear: being better than Michael Jordan.
Then LeBron went atomic, putting up 41-16-7 in Game 5 in Oakland and 41-8-11 in Game 6 in Cleveland, then finishing the series with a triple-double in Game 7, which was highlighted by the single greatest and most important and most impactful and most impossible and most unbelievable block ever in an NBA Finals.
Wouldn’t LeBron getting swept for a second time in the Finals be a truly devastating blow? What other all-time great player has that ever happened to twice?
If that’s the angle you’re arguing from, then how could you ever say that getting swept in a Finals is a bigger black mark than not even getting to a Finals, or broader still, that going 3-for-8 in the Finals is a lesser accomplishment than going 3-for-3 in the Finals, or even 3-for-5 in the Finals, or even 3-for-7 in the Finals? It should be mentioned here that no player in the post-merger top-10 conversation has been to seven straight Finals like LeBron has.
Because LeBron James is the most important person in the Finals.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Important Basketball Game in Silicon Valley”

The 58-year-old investor Jeff Jordan, a general partner at the Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, has an unexpected style on the basketball court.
Venture capitalists have a reputation as solo visionaries, but for Jordan, investing, like basketball, is a team game rather than a maverick’s sport.
“He really, really likes to win,” says Jesse Wood, a participant in the game, former Brown University basketball player, and one of Jordan’s many protégés in the Bay Area.
The Valley venture capital industry is dominated by decades-old incumbents, so both Jordan and the firm are relative newcomers.
When Jordan was coaching a coed intramural basketball game of Stanford MBA students, one of the teams didn’t show and the match devolved into a pickup game that included Jeff.
“He would take me to a basketball game, we would drink half a dozen beers, and then dump me off on the steps. My mother would get so mad,” Jordan says.
If Jordan has a unifying theory, as so many investors do - be it about startups, a basketball game, or living a good life among people you love - the key seems to be an attitude of openness rather than capitalist Darwinism: Keep your circle as wide and interconnected as possible.
The second reflects Jordan’s late-bloomer career path: “How do you go to business school in Silicon Valley in the late ’80s, the place where miracles are happening, and you left to go to L.A. to become a management consultant?”.

The orginal article.