Summary of “The 40% Rule: The Simple Secret To Success”

There is no shortage of business books on the market, most of which claim to hold the secrets to success.
This rare trait goes by many names; grit, perseverance, dedication, ambition, but the name that I think best describes it is “The 40% rule.”
I grew up with the 40% rule, but I didn’t realize it until I read Jesse Itzler’s book “Living With A SEAL.”.
The 40% rule is simple: When your mind is telling you that you’re done, that you’re exhausted, that you cannot possibly go any further, you’re only actually 40% done.
The 40% rule reminds us that no matter how exhausted we might feel, it is always possible to draw on an untapped reserve of energy, motivation, and drive that we all possess.
If it’s too hard for everyone else…. Now, I’ve never lived with a SEAL, but my father is just about the closest civilian equivalent you’ll ever find.
The mere act of saying it reinforces the core principle of the 40% rule.
Growing up my entire worldview revolved around the fact that I should, and could, push myself harder than anyone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Secrets Of Disneyland: A Company Vet Explains How The Magic Happens”

Jody Jean Dreyer, who worked for the Walt Disney Studios and Disney Parks Division for 30 years, attempts to answer that question in her new book, Beyond the Castle: A Guide to Discovering Your Happily Ever After.
Describing the Disney philosophy, Dreyer says, “It’s people, it’s story, and it’s attention to detail.”
During Dreyer’s long career with Disney, she held 22 different positions, including seasonal Disneyland parade dancer, park cashier, and senior vice president of marketing at Walt Disney Studios.
“It’s the combination of all these things that trigger your mind to let you go places, either positive or negative,” says Dreyer, noting that Disney understands that every single piece of an experience must be tended to.
In her book, Dreyer touches upon a few Disney mishaps during her career, including misreading the desires of the Tokyo Disneyland guests.
“What we heard people say is: We want quintessential Disney, so bring on Disney,” Dreyer says.
Dreyer mentions how before launching Disney Cruise Lines, company executives debated the inclusion of casinos, a favorite pastime for ocean travelers.
“One thing Walt Disney got a touch frustrated with at Disneyland was that you could see the workings going on in some places,” Dreyer says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Starting things is scary.”

There is one thing that is even more important than finishing, and that’s starting.
“The secret of getting ahead is getting started.” ~Mark TwainThis seems obvious.
If you think about it, we don’t just start once; we have to start many times over the course of a project.
Finishing is essentially the same as starting anyway.
“Thinking ‘here goes nothing’ could be the start to everything” ~Drew WagnerI allow myself to create complete trash the first time around.
A struggling start is often the symptom of an environment that needs changing.
The motion of walking and the stimulus of the environment starts to stir me up.
At this point, I am so stuffed full of good ideas I have to half-run home to get started.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bruce Springsteen Takes Us on a Tour of His iTunes Playlist – Variety”

Iron & Wine Thea Gilmore Dry the River Jakob Dylan “He’s done some good writing, especially on , the record he made with T Bone Burnett.”Ben Harper Antony and the Johnsons’ “I Am a Bird Now” albumThe National “I’m a big fan, and my son [Evan] is a huge fan.”Kanye West’s “Life of Pablo” album “I thought that was an amazing creation, especially the arrangements.”Sufjan Stevens “He’s great.”Frank Turner Lucinda Williams “She’s fabulous.”Rumer Sam Amidon Magnetic Fields’ “69 Love Songs” album “I love a lot of Stephin Merritt’s records, but especially that one.”
“Yeah, when my daughter was in college she took me with all of her girlfriends, and it was a fantastic show. audience experiences her songwriting very, very personally, and I think she’s speaking to a large part of them very personally. As far as craft, really, really well-built and well-made; they’re very, very sturdy, and the records are too. I admire the modern record-making craft and modern songwriting. It’s not necessarily something I’m driving around listening to in my car 24-7 – I’m too old, I tend to listen to older music.”
“But through my children I’ve experienced a lot of different kinds of music. My son [Evan] was a big political/punk fan, he was into Rage Against the Machine and Tom Morello – Tom can really write – and he really tuned into the Dropkick Murphys and Against Me. My daughter was into Top 40, Taylor Swift and anything that was going on there, so I heard a lot of that through her. And my younger son [Sam] is the classic-rock guy, Bob Marley and Bob Dylan and Creedence – but he got a lot of his music from videogames, from”Call of Duty” and Vietnam videos, and that’s where he got turned onto a lot of ’60s stuff.
Beyond his incredible guitar playing and his thoughtfulness, he’s a wonderful guy to be around – very insightful and intelligent and has a big and wonderful spirit.
Rick Rubin produced a Rage album and a song on the Lana Del Rey album you mentioned.
“We actually met once, right before I began working with Brendan. We had a great meeting and a nice dinner one night, he was a really interesting guy. We met in kind of a break between [my] records, and I think I played him a lot of stuff that ended up on ‘Devils and Dust.’ But we ended up just kinda missing one another , and I ended up with Brendan, who did a great job.”
You’d said earlier that you mostly listen to older music, but almost everything you just mentioned in your iTunes is contemporary – and some if it is pretty far under the radar for most people.
“I go back and forth, but I’m always looking for something new that’s inspiring. I’m so well versed in all my old standards – you can always find something new in them – but I’ve mined them pretty well over the years. There’s a lotta good songwriting and tons of good music being made. Music still excites me and it’s an exciting time, but the trick today is you really have to search for it to find it. But I listen quite a bit and it still holds that sacred place in my life. A great song is always inspirational – it makes you want to be great. So I’m always on the lookout.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside X, Google’s Moonshot Factory”

The setting is X, the so-called moonshot factory at Alphabet, the parent company of Google.
When Teller took the helm of X, he devised the three-part formula for an ideal moonshot project: an important question, a radical solution, and a feasible path to get there.
Four years after Loon’s first real test, in New Zealand, the project is in talks with telecommunications companies around the world, especially where cell towers are hard to build, like the dense jungles and mountains of Peru.
In most companies, projects that don’t work out are stigmatized, and their staffs are fired.
Because the latter possibility is high, the company has also created financial rewards for team members who shut down projects that are likely to fail.
Public companies don’t really invest in experimental research; their R&D is much more D than R. A 2015 study from Duke University found that since 1980, there has been a “Shift away from scientific research by large corporations”-the triumph of short-term innovation over long-term invention.
The first model of the internet was developed at the government’s Advanced Research Projects Agency, now called darpa.
“There is still a huge misconception today that big leaps in technology come from companies racing to make money, but they do not,” says Jon Gertner, the author of The Idea Factory, a history of Bell Labs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “From ‘Westworld’ To The Real World: How Evan Rachel Wood Balances Acting And Activism”

Evan Rachel Wood, the Emmy-nominated star of HBO’s hit show Westworld, is no stranger to fame.
Ever since, Wood has been living her life, at least partially, on-camera, with her breakout role coming at age 14 when she played Tracy Louise Freeland-a teenager involved in drugs, sex and crime-in Thirteen.
Wood’s life off-screen is equally as dynamic.
It’s a role made for someone with as many experiences as Wood, who is often described as wise beyond her years.
“Dolores is multifaceted; she’s obviously an artificial being but what the show explores is what consciousness even is,” said Wood.
“The experiences she’s having are very real; the trauma is real; the pain is real. What’s to say her pain isn’t any different than ours?”.
“She’s a survivor; she’s been abused for about 30 years … she’s been knocked down so many times and she comes back even stronger,” Wood said, adding that Dolores’ strength gave her the strength to go to trauma therapy.
“Being an actor doesn’t take away your humanity or take you out of the real world,” she said, repeating the sentiment she recently expressed on Twitter in response to comments made by Steve Bannon.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Rewards of Being Your Ideal Self in Grand Theft Auto”

For the British artificial intelligence researcher and computer game designer Richard Bartle, the kaleidoscopic variety of human personality and interest is reflected in the video game arena.
Bartle’s research showed that, in general, people were consistent in these preferred ways of being in online video game worlds.
In online role-playing games, for example, players who assume the role of medics, keeping the rest of the team alive in battle will, Bartle found, tend to play the same role across games.
In a 2012 study, titled “The Ideal Self at Play: The Appeal of Video Games That Let You Be All You Can Be,” a team of five psychologists more closely examined the way in which players experiment with “Type” in video games.
“Humans are drawn to video and computer games because such games provide players with access to ideal aspects of themselves,” the authors concluded.
The crucial role of the designer in deciding the rules of how we can be in their game can be vividly seen in Undertale, a critically lauded roleplaying game from 2015 which subverted its genre by allowing players to befriend the game’s monsters, not just stab at them with swords.
The game’s creator, Toby Fox, is reticent to overstate to what degree a player’s choices in his game reveal their personality.
Enjoyment is not the primary motivation-“It is rather,” they wrote, “The result of satisfaction of basic needs.” Video game worlds provide us with places where we can act with impunity within the game’s reality.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Former Superagent Bets Big on a More Diverse Hollywood”

King’s project is to break down these barriers, and he exudes a quiet confidence in his vision: that there is vast cultural and economic opportunity in telling meaningful stories to diverse audiences.
King wants to accomplish something the law cannot: using film to fill in the subtle degrees of experience that reveal our lives to one another.
If the projects the company champions do well, then King, and everything he serves, will do well, too.
King’s career has spanned both reliable franchises like the “Barbershop” movies and more ambitious films like “Fruitvale Station.” He understands what pleases crowds, but he also understands the narrowness of current cinema and the pent-up creative energies outside it.
The companies King cites as similar to Macro include both content behemoths like Vice and nimble midsize production companies like Legendary, whose movies – including “Interstellar” and “Kong: Skull Island” – punch above their weight.
“Things never look exactly as you imagine them, but it’s what he always said he wanted to do.” King plans to produce or co-produce between four and six films a year, with a maximum investment of $35 million, in addition to “At least three shows on streaming, or television and cable,” an unspecified number of digital shows and a portfolio of investments in pure technology companies.
King is modest in conversation, but he has a deep competitive drive, and his superhuman effectiveness actually had me wondering what he wasn’t good at, right until I first got in his car and discovered what a terrifyingly bad driver he is.
Macro, King believes, is in the vanguard of a new cultural universe, one made possible by the shrinking space between technology and film.

The orginal article.

Summary of “To Be a Great Leader, You Have to Learn How to Delegate Well”

The inverse equation of shrinking resources and increasing demands will eventually catch up to you, and at that point how you involve others sets the ceiling of your leadership impact.
The upper limit of what’s possible will increase only with each collaborator you empower to contribute their best work to your shared priorities.
How ancillary or essential you are to the success of that portfolio depends on how decisively and wisely you activate those around you.
Regardless of your preferred methodology for delegation, here are four strategies that I’ve found work for leaders at all levels.
This not only clarifies the frequency of touchpoints they will find useful but also gives them autonomy in how the delegated work will move forward.
As Anika considered her obligation to develop others – upskilling, providing tangible leadership experience, and so on – she redefined her leadership mandate to avoid being involved and not being essential: “I lead people, priorities, and projects – in that order – and the work will get done because the right people are focused on the right tasks.”
Some of the initiatives could be completely handed off, while others could be broken down into a few smaller pieces in order to involve others without a full transfer of responsibility.
Staying mindful of these four strategies, working out the kinks like Anika did, and becoming proficient at empowering others to deliver their best builds your capacity to get the job done through the contributions of others.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Israel Caught Russian Hackers Scouring the World for U.S. Secrets”

The Wall Street Journal reported last week that Russian hackers had stolen classified N.S.A. materials from a contractor using the Kaspersky software on his home computer.
The role of Israeli intelligence in uncovering that breach and the Russian hackers’ use of Kaspersky software in the broader search for American secrets have not previously been disclosed.
Kaspersky Lab denied any knowledge of, or involvement in, the Russian hacking.
“Kaspersky Lab has never helped, nor will help, any government in the world with its cyberespionage efforts,” the company said in a statement Tuesday afternoon.
For years, there has been speculation that Kaspersky’s popular antivirus software might provide a back door for Russian intelligence.
Among the targets Kaspersky uncovered were hotels and conference venues used for closed-door meetings by members of the United Nations Security Council to negotiate the terms of the Iran nuclear deal – negotiations from which Israel was excluded.
Technical experts say that at least in theory, Russian intelligence hackers could have exploited Kaspersky’s worldwide deployment of software and sensors without the company’s cooperation or knowledge.
Steven L. Hall, a former chief of Russian operations at the C.I.A., said his former agency never used Kaspersky software, but other federal agencies did.

The orginal article.