Summary of “Elon Musk’s support of universal basic income will only just help big businesses stay big.”

Of course Musk, son of the neoliberal era, wants UBI to be instituted: It’s just peachy for him and his businesses, as it means his consumers will have more income to spend on his goods.
Let’s not let them all off so easily when it comes to their determined and growing support for UBI. After all, this policy is not one confined to their own business practice, but something they wish to impose on states and nations-on us.
UBI is a hack that may well benefit its Silicon Valley advocates in the short-term, but it’ll compound income and social inequality for the rest of us for decades.
The Notorious UBI. UBI is an old economic proposition and one with some very different champions.
Beyond the support of people and politicians, UBI has our era’s true leaders-the billionaires of Silicon Valley-on its side.
We could, like Musk, encourage the state to pay us just enough UBI to keep innovative capitalists, who have made most of our labor redundant, innovating toward Mars.
These isolated experiments-which are usually moral rather than economic ones designed to prove that people who are in work will stay in work, even if their income increases-cannot reflect the macroeconomic glitches the UBI patch may cause.
Just as prices would be likely to rise with the introduction of a new basic wage, so they would with the introduction of UBI. UBI absorbed into current conditions is therefore likely to provide no positive change for us.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Our 6 Must Reads if You’re at a Startup With 30+ People”

Bezos’ now-famous two-pizza team, which posits that the recommended size of a team – that can balance collaboration and autonomy – is one that can be fed by two pizzas, or between six to 10 people.
Molly Graham, VP, Operations at the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative and former Quip COO, articulates it best: 30 to 50 people is where you go from being a family to being a company, and everything starts to get really hard.
“Make your top rating special. Only put a small percentage of people in that bracket – like 1 to 2 people if you’re at 30 or less employees, or 1 to 5 if you’re at 50 or less,” says Graham.
You can include everyone in this phase of the process – individual engineers, the people that work with your business partners, the people in community or customer service who hear what your consumers are saying every day.
If you have five people participating in the prioritization process and $150 in engineering capacity, you would make five stacks of stickies, each worth $5. Everyone gets six so they have $30 to “Spend” on features.
“Typically, if you’re a 25-person company, no one will care enough to attack you – which is a good defense for a while. But past this, you’ll have enough attention that people are going to at least casually try to troll you,” Engberg warns.
“There are some really easy things you can do at this stage. Probably 80% of startup teams are using Google Apps for their employees’ email and calendaring. So setting up two-factor authentication for logins is just a matter of turning on that setting as an administrator. So many people know that setting is there, that it can be enforced for all employees instantly, but they still don’t do it. There’s no excuse.”
“Don’t establish your values right after you’ve just incorporated. Your company is not mature enough; it’s people, product and process are not known entities. But don’t do it in the company’s twilight years either.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ravens Are So Smart, One Hacked This Researcher’s Experiment”

We’re entering the Dawn of the Planet of the Ravens.
Ravens, along with jays and crows, belong to a family of birds called corvids, known for their intelligence: Previous studies have researched how Eurasian jays, for example, stash away food for future use, instead of eating it right away.
In this study, researchers from Lund University in Sweden trained ravens to use a simple machine where they dropped a rock in a tube to earn a food reward.
In another experiment, 78 percent of ravens were able to successfully barter with a human and exchange goods-trading a bottlecap for a reward-a higher success rate than what’s been seen in similar experiments done with apes.
He described to me how one experiment took an eerie turn: One raven in the experiment figured out how to work their rock/box contraption first, then began teaching the method to other ravens, and finally invented its own way of doing it.
The bird had to be removed from the experiment before it could teach any other birds how to do it.
The evolution of corvids like ravens is so distant from us that it suggests they developed this ability for their own unique reasons.
“Bird brains are just bird brains, it was almost like an insult. But it should be a compliment,” Kabadayi said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Create a Perennial Bestseller”

Is a meditation on the ingredients required to create classic books, businesses, and art that does more than just disappear.
Perennial sellers are movies like the Shawshank Redemption, artists like Iron Maiden, startups like Craigslist, books like the 48 Laws of Power.
The novelist Ian McEwan complained lightheartedly about what it was like to go out and market a book after spending all that time creating it: “I feel like the wretched employee of my former self. My former self, being the happily engaged novelist who now sends me, a kind of brush salesman or double glazing salesman, out on the road to hawk this book. He got all the fun writing it. I’m the poor bastard who has to go sell it.”
He replied to each offer to help-but there was so many he actually got temporarily blocked from his his own gmail account! Yet this process unearthed a number of podcasts, book clubs, speaking opportunities and interviews that helped the book debut on the national bestseller list.
A blurb on the back of a book isn’t bringing new fans to the book; it’s there to convince an interested reader, “Hey, this thing is legit.” Katz’s Deli has photos of the owner with all the celebrities who’ve eaten there-but they’re hanging inside the restaurant.
Piece headlined: “How a book on stoicism became wildly popular at every level of the NFL.” It sold so many books the publisher ran out of stock-but that wouldn’t have happened had I pitched SI. The story had to be traded up the chain.
How many bestselling books came out in 2007? Many, but few took the time to build a blog around their book, featuring other writers no less, but it was Tim’s decision to do that that was instrumental in the book continuing to sell over time.
The best way to become an author is to write more books, just as a true entrepreneur starts more than one business.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Did Airbnb Kill the Mountain Town?”

We’re ­seated at the Brick Oven, a locals’ hangout on Elk Avenue, the town’s main spine, where tidy wood-frame buildings in a rainbow palette glow beneath the snow-capped mass of the eponymous mountain.
In the Mountain West-“God’s country, renter’s hell,” as one alt-weekly tagged it-where towns are already chronically beset by housing shortages, traffic problems, and the invariable ambivalence about sharing one’s slice of heaven with the tourists who help sustain it, the entrance of Airbnbs and VRBOs and HomeAways has heightened the tension.
Michael Yerman, Crested Butte’s town planner, lives in a deed-restricted part of town where STRs are not allowed, and he described how his neighbors had helped him dig out of his “Snow cave” after the recent storm.
From 19th century miners to 20th-­century skiers, people have long sought a temporary abode in mountain towns.
Nobody in the town’s government, MacDonald told me, thinks that limiting STRs “Is ­going to solve the affordable-housing problem.” MacDonald, curiously, was the first person I met who lived in Crested Butte proper.
In most Rocky Mountain ski towns, any commercial development needs to mitigate its impact by providing a certain amount of affordable housing for its workforce.
While Mt. Crested Butte, a small, tourist-focused settlement at the base of the ski area, has some 1,100 rooms in hotels and condos, the town itself has only a handful of small inns, with STRs now making up 65 percent of total lodging tax revenue.
Another woman, a realtor, voiced a perspective I often heard from opponents of regulation: “I’m not sure what the problem is.” Crested Butte had spent money to bring more visitors, she argued, “But now we’re saying we don’t want them here.” Limiting STRs “Is not ­going to lower the price in town. The town is going through the roof because people want to live here.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “America Named Over China as World’s Leading Economic Power”

In seven of the 10 European Union nations in the study, China is considered the leading economic power.
China leads the U.S. by a two-to-one margin in Australia – a longtime U.S. ally, but also a country whose top trading partner, by far, is China.
Following the onset of the financial crisis nearly a decade ago, Europeans increasingly named China, rather than the U.S., as the world’s leading economic power.
Globally, U.S. still seen as leading economic power, but gap with China is narrowing.
Survey respondents were asked which is the world’s leading economic power: the U.S., China, the countries of the EU, or Japan.
China is named the world’s top economy in 12 countries, double the number of nations who saw China in the economic lead when the question was last asked in the same countries between 2014 and 2016.
Australia is the country most convinced that China is the world’s leading economic power – 58% of Australians hold this view.
Before the Great Recession, across five European countries, people were more inclined to name the U.S. as the economic leader, but after the start of the crash, these five European publics named China as the leader.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Smart questions to ask at the end of a job interview”

Your questions should be thoughtful, intelligent, and demonstrate that you are serious about the role and the company.
‘Beyond the hard skills required to successfully perform this job, what soft skills would serve the company and position best?’.
Peter Harrison, CEO of Snagajob, tells Business Insider this is a respectful way to ask about shortcomings within the company – which you should be aware of before joining.
Knowing how a company measures its employees’ success is important.
This question shows the interviewer that you care about your future at the company, and it will also help you decide if you’re a good fit for the position, Vicky Oliver writes in her book “301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions.”
Knowing how a company deals with conflicts gives you a clearer picture of the company’s culture, Harrison says.
Asking about problems within a company gets the “Conversation ball” rolling, and your interviewer will surely have an opinion, Oliver writes.
Asking this question will show your interviewer that you can think big-picture, you’re wanting to stay with the company long-term, and you want to make a lasting impression in whatever company you end up at, Harrison says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jefferies gives IBM Watson a Wall Street reality check”

IBM Watson effectively operates as a consultancy where the company engages in high-value contracts with corporates to implement Watson technology for specific business cases.
IBM is struggling to bridge the gap between client needs and its own technological capability.
Jefferies pulls from an audit of a partnership between IBM Watson and MD Anderson as a case study for IBM’s broader problems scaling Watson.
MD Anderson cut its ties with IBM after wasting $60 million on a Watson project that was ultimately deemed, “Not ready for human investigational or clinical use.”
If job postings are any indication, IBM is not keeping pace with other technology companies in hiring machine learning developers.
The information provided in Jefferies’ report isn’t new nor groundbreaking, but it’s a strong signal that Wall Street is beginning to pay more close attention to the challenges facing IBM Watson.
I’ve listened to my fair share of IBM earnings calls and it’s clear the market has been focusing too heavily on short-run growth and not enough on long-term technological or strategic sustainability.
It seems perfectly reasonable that IBM shot out of the gates like a rocket in a mostly sterile AI market selling to CTOs and newly minted chief data officers with just enough anxiety to open check books.

The orginal article.

Summary of “LISTEN: 12 podcasts that explore the human side of tech”

As technology pervades every part of our lives, someone talking us through what it means can be a comfort.
Ben Thompson and James Allworth explore the effect of technology on society as a whole.
Two guys, 40 years of online experience, and a no-holds-barred discussion of how the internet is affecting our lives for good or bad. 3.
Practical advice and tips for being a happier and more productive human with help from technology from the team at Lifehacker.
Bloomberg Tech reporters uncover what’s happening behind the innovation that’s driving the economy.
A show for a better future: interviews with great minds in tech, philosophy and art.
Join Team Motherboard’s fast-paced look at new technology, culture and discoveries.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and Oprah all use the 5-hour rule”

Over the past year, I’ve explored the personal history of many widely admired business leaders like Elon Musk, Oprah Winfrey, Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and Mark Zuckerberg to understand how they apply the principles of deliberate practice.
Many of these leaders, despite being extremely busy, set aside at least an hour a day over their entire career for activities that could be classified as deliberate practice or learning.
How the best leaders follow the 5-hour rule For the leaders I tracked, the five-hour rule often fell into three buckets: reading, reflection, and experimentation.
The power of the 5-hour rule: improvement rate People who apply the five-hour rule in the world of work have an advantage.
We should look at learning like we look at exercise We need to move beyond the cliche, “Life-long learning is good,” and think more deeply about what the minimum amount of learning the average person should do each day to have a sustainable and successful career.
Bottom line: The busiest, most successful people in the world find at least an hour to learn EVERY DAY. So can you!
Find the time for reading and learning even if you are really busy and overwhelmed.
Increase the results you receive from each hour of learning by using proven hacks that help you remember and apply what you learn.

The orginal article.