Summary of “The Legend of Yanda”

He recognized then what Yanda could not: The rookie had what it took to be “One of the good ones.” The pair spent only one year together, but Yanda seized on every moment he could to mine Ogden for advice.
One such pointer was internalizing what a player had to do to earn the right to spend the offseason where he pleased, and by his fifth NFL season, Yanda finally felt comfortable doing just that.
It was in the middle of “Hawkeye country,” as Yanda puts it, and most Saturdays were spent watching head coach Hayden Fry’s Iowa teams on the living room TV. Yanda dreamed of one day playing in Kinnick Stadium, but poor grades forced him to attend North Iowa Area Community College directly after high school.
With his hopes of playing at his dream school dwindling and nothing to lose, Yanda decided to take control of his future.
The quintessential Marshal Yanda play happened in Week 13 of the 2014 season, during the second quarter of a 34-33 loss to the Chargers.
Before his fourth campaign, it seemed as if Yanda would finally get the chance to play his desired guard spot full time.
The difference these days is that now Yanda is the Pro Bowl fixture Baltimore’s young players try to emulate.
While Yanda may never be a famous face around the league, that hasn’t stopped his legend from spreading: The stars about whom fans will tell tales for years to come will do the same about Marshal Yanda.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Weird Things I Learned By Purging Pop Culture From My Life”

It turns out that – at least for me – having a conversation without that sort of catalyst was hard.
At one point, it was at the core of my pop culture fandom.
As new and much better entertainment options entered my view, they naturally pushed Supernatural onto the outer rim of my capacity to give a shit about the adventures of two handsome denim models fighting ghosts for an eighth season that I’m now just watching out of sheer obligation.
The time I used to invest into caring about the Brett Thunderscrotum, P.I. urban fantasy book series was split with the Sargent Nazi Killer comic book series, which might be naturally phased out of my attention by a freshly discovered, riveting NPR podcast in which a guy from Brooklyn invades the life of some random guy from the South like he just discovered a new Amazonian tribe.
Look, I’m not telling you to give up pop culture or to take a shit in your PlayStation.
I’m saying that when I started filtering out the things I was consuming just to consume, the quality went way up.
At least it did after a brief detox, working my way through Brett Thunderscrotum, P.I. withdrawal.
Seriously, you should take a shit in your PlayStation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Confessions of a Cartel Hit Man”

The cartel’s main assassin, David Barron, had killed close to a hundred people for the Arellano Félix Organization, or AFO. He used pistols, shotguns, rifles, machetes, knives, sledgehammers, chainsaws, and plain old meat cleavers.
The assassination attempt failed to kill Ramón, but he wasn’t about to let Chapo’s guys live to brag about it.
Once we’d memorized the guys’ faces, their houses, and how they worked, I started looking for ways to get in and out of the street fast.
All we needed was the opportunity to get these three guys out in the street at the same time.
All three of our targets were out in the street serving cars that had just pulled up.
We had our hands on the door handles ready to swing out and kill her.
The body count turned out to be only two out of three.
Adapted from Confessions of a Cartel Hit Man, by Martin Corona with Tony Rafael, to be published in July by Dutton, a division of Penguin Random House.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Players’ Tribune”

On, July 1, 2014, exactly three years to the day after I went to rehab, I signed with the team I’d rooted for my entire life.
After my senior year, I was drafted by the Phoenix Coyotes and was on my way to play at the University of Maine.
I’ll just go to Coyotes camp and make the team.
My HockeyDB.com page looks ridiculous, and it’s actually missing some teams.
Teams would call me up in emergency situations for a weekend, but sometimes I wouldn’t actually play.
I’d get called up by some team for a weekend, hop on a plane and then have to walk into a locker room with 30 guys I had never met before.
On October 26, I got called up to play my first game for the Blackhawks at the United Center.
The core players on that team were some of the most gifted athletes I’ve ever seen, both physically and mentally.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Fashion Outlaw Dapper Dan”

At his Harlem brownstone a few days before the Gucci controversy, Mr. Day described how his ideas on fashion, business and life in general came to be.
Another experience with shoes gave him an understanding of how clothes reflect social status.
“This kid from this snobbish family that lived in the brownstone next door to us began to tease me. He said, ‘Lily Day must’ve hit the number, because you got new shoes.’ I got so mad at that kid, because he was right. Every time my mom hit the number, she bought me and my siblings new shoes. But after those experiences, I started to do for myself. I was going through the window.”
Much of what Mr. Day and Mr. Kirkland talk about regarding the need to dress to impress is part of a generational mind-set for many black men who grew up in Harlem.
“My earliest experiences regarding race was in the home,” Mr. Day said.
Mr. Day’s pursuit of the American dream began in two seemingly different but analogous institutions: the street corner and the classroom.
“The name was a combination of two things. I was the flyest young guy in my neighborhood. But there was also an older guy, a gambler, and his name was Dapper Dan. When I started beating this guy in the crap games, he said, ‘You are the new Dapper Dan.’ He was also a really great tenor saxophonist. He told me: ‘Just call me Tenor Man Dan. Now, you’re Dapper Dan.'”.
Mr. Day grew tired of running the streets after witnessing speeches by Malcolm X. “Malcolm X once said, ‘If you want to understand the flower, study the seed.

The orginal article.