Summary of “Good Leaders Are Good Learners”

Although organizations spend more than $24 billion annually on leadership development, many leaders who have attended leadership programs struggle to implement what they’ve learned.
Our research on leadership development shows that leaders who are in learning mode develop stronger leadership skills than their peers.
Building on Susan Ashford and Scott DeRue’s mindful engagement experiential learning cycle, we found that leaders who exhibit a growth mindset diligently work through each of the following three phases of the experiential learning cycle.
First, leaders set challenging learning goals in the form of “I need to learn how to” For some leaders, the goal might be to become more persuasive or to be more approachable.
Finally, leaders who are in learning mode conduct fearless after-action reviews, determined to glean useful insights from the results of their experimentation.
How can leaders enter learning mode? Leaders can construe setbacks as meaning they have not yet developed the required capabilities, rather than them being just not cut out for the task at hand.
How can organizations help leaders enter and remain in learning mode? Organizational leaders can help rising leaders focus more on being progressively better than they were in the past, rather than on constantly benchmarking themselves against others.
The bottom line is that by supporting leaders being in learning mode, organizations can develop the capabilities that leaders need to anticipate, respond to, and continually learn from the stream of emerging challenges to organizational prosperity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “China Shows Off Military Might as Xi Jinping Tries to Cement Power”

“These military parades could become a regular, institutionalized thing, but this one also has a special meaning this year,” said Deng Yuwen, a former editor at a party newspaper in Beijing who writes current affairs commentaries.
“It’s meant to show that Xi Jinping firmly has the military in his grip, and nobody should have any illusions of challenging him.”
The congress will almost certainly give Mr. Xi, 64, a second, five-year term as the party general secretary and chairman of the commission that controls the military, and it will appoint a new team to work under him.
Mr. Sun, 53, had been the party secretary of Chongqing, a city in southwest China, until his dismissal in mid-July.The party announced last Monday that he was under investigation for violations of “Discipline” – usually a euphemism for corruption – and Mr. Sun has since been pilloried in official media.
On Friday, Study Times, a party newspaper widely read by officials, devoted its front page to an adulatory profile of Mr. Xi that said he was blessed by his “Red” upbringing with special leadership mettle.
The profile also said Mr. Xi personally pushed through difficult and contentious policy changes in his first five years in power, including building artificial islands fitted with military installations in the disputed South China Sea.”In the South China Sea, he personally decided on building islands and consolidating reefs,” the profile said.
Mr. Xi had, it said, “Built a robust strategic base for ultimately prevailing in the struggle to defend the South China Sea, and has in effect constructed a Great Wall at sea.”
Mr. Xi’s power has already unsettled critics, including some inside the party, who worry that he has destabilized norms of collective leadership that can slow decision-making but also prevent dangerous overreach.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Become a More Well-Rounded Leader”

For years, when I spoke with CEOs or senior leaders, it was because they were interested in how my consulting firm could help their employees become more engaged, or innovative, or sustainably high-performing.
During the past year – and especially the past six months – I’ve been hearing a different and much more personal initial question: “Can you help me better manage my own life?”.
Ambivalence about how to best attract, manage, and retain Millennials, who now represent the largest generation in the workforce, expect more flexibility in the way they work, and prefer to work for employers with a mission that goes beyond maximizing profit.
How can leaders balance these complex and often competing demands? The core challenge for modern leaders, I believe, is to become more wholly human – to actively develop a wider range of capabilities and to more deeply understand themselves.
Are there occasions when your strength became a liability, causing more harm than good and even leading to the opposite of what you intended?
During the past year, as we introduced a new business model, I felt compelled to push harder and exercise more control than I had in the past.
A leader who values directness is more likely to give feedback that others can hear and apply if she balances her honesty with care and compassion.
Embracing our own complexity makes us more wholly human and gives us additional resources to manage ourselves and others in an increasingly complex world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Our 6 Must Reads for Scaling Yourself as a Leader”

Regardless, you’re likely to find yourself looking at your current role, looking ahead to the role you want, and wondering how in the hell you’ll be able to get there when you’re already buckling under the weight of your work.
Not just your skills, but also your energy, the way you manage your time, how you delegate, how you recharge, how you teach others, and more.
In this article, she teaches you how to audit your own energy throughout the day – the questions you should ask yourself, how you should record responses, and how to make meaning out of this data.
Double down on Verresen’s wisdom with this article on how abundant thinking can change your mindset to be a better leader as well.
Here’s the real danger: As a leader, you’ll probably feel great about how busy you are.
She’s one of those people who has the job that makes you stare and wonder, ‘How does she do it?’ So it’s comforting to hear her talk vulnerably and candidly about how she’s hit walls in the past and learned to push through them.
This is just the beginning of the Review’s wisdom on how to become a more efficient and productive leader.
Check out the full articles referenced above as well as others on how happiness can power up your leadership, how to better delegate at every stage of company growth, and how to manage different employees toward different goals.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 Ways Managers Can Be More Inclusive”

Many leaders know this but still struggle with making day-to-day work more inclusive.
Inclusive leaders don’t hire the way managers traditionally do, hewing to some established formula for assessing a recruit’s desired credentials or background.
A former team member of restaurant innovator Norman Brinker remembered that Brinker “Would challenge you. He would say: ‘What do you think you could do there? What is working? Go try something’ It was very empowering because it gave you a license to say, ‘We can do some things differently!'” Unlike their more conventional peers, inclusive leaders believe it’s “Innovate or die,” and the only way to stay alive is to set aside their assumptions and fears and welcome good ideas from everywhere.
That’s precisely the kind of thing an inclusive leader likes to see.
Traditionally, leaders place arbitrary limits on the potential of their employees: Before you can take on more responsibility, you have to be a certain age or from a certain background, for example.
Whereas traditional leaders might foster either a competitive environment or close collaboration between team members, inclusive leaders do both at once.
In my work with senior executives, I’ve found that some “Get” how to become more open and inclusive more readily than others.
If you practice curiosity and courageousness, and then incorporate the management behaviors described here, you’ll increase your odds of becoming an inclusive leader and building a high-performance, high-growth organization.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Employees Quit on Their Bosses? Because They Never Get Asked These Important Questions”

There is a high commitment on the part of these leaders to give employees the right exposure and skills that fit their strengths, a well-defined career track, and meaningful work; there’s also a commitment to identifying next-generation leaders to carry the torch so high-performing cultures are sustained.
Part of growing employees is ensuring them of an engaging and positive work experience.
Over the decades, it has interviewed tens of thousands of employees to find the core of a great workplace, resulting in its “Q12 Engagement Survey.”
If you’re a leader or manager and your employees were asked the following about you, how would you do in this assessment?
Here’s a fact: When employees don’t get the tools, training, time, development, clear expectations, vision, or resources to do their jobs well, they experience low morale.
Great managers don’t just tell employees what’s expected of them and leave it at that; instead, they frequently talk with employees about their responsibilities and progress, especially during those first few months on the job.
Asking these questions fosters a sense that employees are doing meaningful work, belonging, and making a difference.
Asking smart follow-up questions will help such managers understand where each employee is coming from.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Managers Drive Results and Employee Engagement at the Same Time”

Is it possible to be a high-standards, results-driven leader while at the same time building an engaged, fun-to-work-with team? Many people would contend that doing either of these things well makes it almost impossible to succeed at the other.
In this case we did see some decline in both skills with age, but people skills declined more than drive for results as leaders moved from supervisor to top management.
To understand how some leaders are able to perform both capabilities well, we compared the results for the group in the top quartile of both skills to all other leaders in the data set.
We labelled these clusters “Behavioral bridges,” because the evidence suggests they enable leaders to simultaneously drive for results and practice good interpersonal skills.
More than three-quarters of leaders were rated higher on their ability to drive for results than on their ability to inspire and motivate others.
We often refer to driving for results as “Push” and to inspiring as “Pull.” When a leader has the ability to drive hard for results and at the same time inspire high effort and performance, they are much more likely to achieve results.
Leaders who care about the development of subordinates and who also take the time to develop these people reap the benefits in the results produced.
Having the ability to simultaneously drive for results and practice excellent people skills is a powerful combination that has a dramatic impact on a leader’s effectiveness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Communicate Clearly During Organizational Change”

Too many followers tasked with delivering strategic change report that their leaders weren’t clear enough about what they wanted the change to achieve or about what it would entail.
Why do we need to change, and why now? What are the imperatives driving this change? Why is the previous strategy no longer good enough? Where on the P&L are we feeling, or anticipating, pain? Are you sure you want X to change, even if it means you can’t have Y anymore? What is the full extent of the change we need? Don’t underestimate the extent of the change you need, either privately or publicly.
Tempting it is to tell people that this is just an incremental change – when it is nothing of the sort – or however politically expedient it seems to underplay the extent of the change required, a lack of clarity about the extent of the change required will make subsequent conversations about resources and priorities much harder.
If we figure out 1 and 2, what should improve as a result? How will we measure the improvement we’ve been targeting ? And perhaps most overlooked of all: How does this new strategy or change link to previous strategies? Answering this question is critical if leaders are to reduce the confusion that a cumulative overload of strategic or change initiatives – another year, another “Strategy” – and their potentially conflicting targets can cause.
Living the change you want to see means much more than modeling any behaviors you’ve asked for; it also means making a myriad of decisions that support the change.
It is what David Nadler and Michael Tushman, in their 1990 exploration of how change becomes institutionalized, called “Mundane behaviors.” It means changing how you spend your time.
If you’re not giving time to the change you’ve asked for, followers will interpret this as the latest change not really being important, and will act accordingly.
If what gets measured is what gets managed, give the change its best chance by signaling as early as possible that new metrics will be introduced to measure, and therefore embed, the change you’ve asked for.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Do You Know Someone Has True Leadership Skills? Look for These 5 Signs”

Sometimes the only way you’ll truly know whether a leader’s skills are genuine is to measure the manager that made your life miserable against the one that had you thinking often, “This is too good to be true.”
If you think your boss is some freak of nature and you’re the luckiest person alive, I’ll break it to you gently: He or she is most likely the kind of leader who demonstrates best-in-class behaviors identified in the research of those leading the most profitable companies on the planet.
They are often referred to as servant leaders, conscious leaders, authentic leaders, or transformational leaders.
To get practical, let’s dive into the most prevalent leadership behaviors of such leaders.
Congratulations! Joy is an emotion evoked by well-being and success that’s experienced by every employee in healthy cultures under great leaders.
Next thing you know, you look up, it’s 5:30 p.m., and the place is still buzzing with energy and excitement, and people find it hard to pull away and go home.
People development is not a separate retention activity enforced by HR. It’s ingrained in the mindset of servant leaders.
Let’s face it, if you are considering developing leaders, trust is a pillar your company’s leadership should stand on.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Be an Inspiring Leader”

Our research shows that while anyone can become an inspiring leader, in most companies, there are far too few of them.
In employer surveys that we conducted with the Economist Intelligence Unit, we found that less than half of respondents said they agree or strongly agree that their leaders were inspiring or were unlocking motivation in employees.
To understand what makes a leader inspirational, Bain & Company launched a new research program, starting with a survey of 2,000 people.
Vision, focus, servanthood, and sponsorship help them lead. We found that people who inspire are incredibly diverse, which underscores the need to find inspirational leaders that are right for motivating your organization-there is no universal archetype.
A corollary of this finding is that anyone can become an inspirational leader by focusing on his or her strengths.
Although we found that many different attributes help leaders inspire people, we also found that you need only one of them to double your chances of being an inspirational leader.
Inspirational leaders recognize the need to pick their moments carefully to reinforce a performance culture in a way that can also be inspiring.
The more often they behave in a new way, the sooner they become a new type of leader, an inspirational leader.

The orginal article.