Summary of “Shady Online Marketers Are Selling Links In Articles On, BBC, CNN, And Other News Sites”

Search engine optimization consultants buy expired URLs that have been linked to by prominent news websites and redirect these domains to their clients’ sites in a bid to game search results.
An investigation by BuzzFeed News found dozens of examples of the link hijack scheme being used to secure backlinks from at least 10 major news sites, including the New York Times, the Guardian, Forbes, HuffPost, CNN, BBC News, and Bloomberg.
BuzzFeed News identified 15 articles that contained links that had been redirected to sites selling hospital supplies, hotel deals, and online payment services.
The New York Times and the Guardian acknowledged the issue after being contacted by BuzzFeed News, and both news sites said they were working on solutions.
BBC News has at least 10 articles with links that now redirect to sites advertising online gambling, free consultations with a Utah bankruptcy lawyer, and a privacy browser that circumvents China’s internet firewall.
One of the sellers, an Indian vendor with the tagline “Your Trustful Technical SEO Lady,” sent screenshots illustrating how she used online tools to locate dead links on the New York Times and redirect them to her client’s website, a dubious-seeming Android app store based in India.
BuzzFeed News previously reported how savvy reputation consultants use fake sites, phony social media accounts, and link networks – blogs that fraudulently manipulate Google’s search rankings through the reciprocal exchange of links – to promote positive content about their clients and make negative results, such as criminal convictions, disappear.
Although a spokesperson for the company said the examples provided by BuzzFeed News would be considered a violation of its existing policies, the online marketers on Fiverr seem undeterred.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Finland is winning the war on fake news. Other nations want the blueprint”

The lesson wrapped with a popular “Deepfake” – highly realistic manipulated video or audio – of Barack Obama to highlight the challenges of the information war ahead. The course is part of an anti-fake news initiative launched by Finland’s government in 2014 – two years before Russia meddled in the US elections – aimed at teaching residents, students, journalists and politicians how to counter false information designed to sow division.
A year later, Finland brought in American experts to advise officials on how to recognize fake news, understand why it goes viral and develop strategies to fight it.
Graphic: Henrik Pettersson, CNN. Although it’s difficult to measure the results in real-time, the approach appears to be working, and now other countries are looking to Finland as an example of how to win the war on misinformation.
Not all nations have the type of narrative to fall back on that Finland does.
Finland also has long tradition of reading – its 5.5 million people borrow close to 68 million books a year and it just spent $110 million on a state-of-the-art library, referred to lovingly as “Helsinki’s living room.” Finland has the highest PISA score for reading performance in the EU. And as trust in the media has flagged in other parts of the globe, Finland has maintained a strong regional press and public broadcaster.
According to the Reuters Institute Digital News Report 2018, Finland tops the charts for media trust, which means its citizens are less likely to turn to alternative sources for news.
Perhaps the biggest sign that Finland is winning the war on fake news is the fact that other countries are seeking to copy its blueprint.
“A couple of years ago, one of my colleagues said that he thought Finland has won the first round countering foreign-led hostile information activities. But even though Finland has been quite successful, I don’t think that there are any first, second or third rounds, instead, this is an ongoing game,” Toivanen said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Take Control of Your Learning at Work”

Instead of genuinely promoting a learning culture, most employers obsess over results, demanding higher and higher levels of efficiency and performance, which can be the biggest barrier to curiosity and learning.
To create a learning culture, organizations must value psychological safety, diversity, openness to ideas, and reflection time, all of which can hinder short-term results.
One of the biggest barriers to learning is time, particularly when you are focused on delivering top levels of performance.
If you are waiting to be told what to learn, you are not being proactive about your learning.
Too often we equate learning with formal training or education, but some of the biggest learning opportunities are organic or spontaneous, and this is also true at work.
Whereas formal learning interventions tend to boost only the acquisition of specific content or subject matter expertise, spontaneous and social types of learning are more likely to result in the formation of new habits and practical behaviors.
If you have limited opportunities to learn from others, you can always learn something about yourself: how do others perceive you, including your talents and performance? Answering these questions will help you identify gaps, as well as future learning areas.
Regardless of your past achievements and your present level of expertise, your future depends on your ability to keep learning.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes Can’t Afford Insulin When They Turn 26 Without Insurance”

People with Type 1 diabetes are dependent on multiple types of insulin to survive, because the disease shuts down the pancreas’s ability to produce the chemical, which regulates the amount of sugar in the blood.
Most people with Type 1 diabetes take at least two types of insulin: a long-acting type taken daily that constantly releases insulin, and a short-acting or rapid-acting type, taken either before or after eating.
The amount of insulin a person with Type 1 diabetes needs varies dramatically depending on age, weight, food eaten, exercise, illness, stress, and, for women, if they are menstruating or ovulating.
A December study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed that 1 in 4 people with diabetes have rationed their insulin because of high costs.
“They’re on their parents’ insurance now, but some are in the gig economy, moving from one job to the next as they start their lives, they may not have a job with insurance that covers their insulin, or their job may have zero insurance, or it’s a job that’s under-insured with high deductibles,” he said.
Some young adults with Type 1 diabetes find it difficult to afford their medicine even with government-sponsored insurance.
In the interim, he would be paying list price for insulin during that in-between period with or without government insurance.
“This isn’t an option. Type 1 diabetes is a fatal disease if you don’t have insulin.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stay Confident During Your Job Search by Focusing on the Process, Not the Outcome”

There are several reasons you want to avoid appearing – at networking events or in job interviews – as if you need the job too much.
The more worried you are that your job search is dragging on, the less likely you are to project the sense that you will handle whatever the job requires.
Process goals are particularly valuable during an arduous job search.
First, you are likely to be less frustrated about the job search when you are paying attention to the specific actions you need to take.
You may not succeed at getting a job on any particular day, but you may have succeeded at applying for new positions, meeting new people, or learning new things.
Second, many of the things you need to do to get a job are things you need to do after you get hired as well.
If you develop habits to read and learn skills, you’ll retain the benefits of those activities even after you start a new job.
Instead of getting desperate that you’ll never get a job – and scaring off potential employees – focus on the job search process, not just the outcome.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Story Universe of Magic: The Gathering Is Expanding”

Underpinning all that were the five colors-white, black, red, green, and blue-that represent the different kinds of magic spells in the game.
Inside the game’s story universe-the stories told on the website and over the course of the releases of new sets of cards-multiple strands of narrative came to an intertwined climax earlier this year.
Now more is coming: A novel that advanced the story further debuted at number five on the New York Times bestseller list.
As the story grows, it feeds back into the game.
You see how this works, right? The game can generate and absorb story.
“A game mechanism is a kind of cosmology, whether you want to recognize it,” Kelman says.
“We want to create a cosmology that honors the game mechanisms without literalizing them.”
Conversely, the new animated series has to generate a story-something that drives multiple hours of narrative-from the game mechanic.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Keep Fake News Out of Your Head”

Remember when the Internet was going to educate us and elevate our overall intelligence as a species? All that good stuff may happen, but at present, digital fake news is deceiving countless minds.
I disagree with calls for governments and corporations to clean up the mess that is online fake news.
If you encounter a lone report that describes the opening of a new habitat featuring a live Bigfoot specimen at the San Diego Zoo or the invasion of South Korea by North Korean killer robots, chances are good that it’s fake news.
Many fake news sites seek to fool people with a Web address that is similar to a legitimate news site.
Most troublesome is that some fake news is designed to look credible at first glance.
Part of the reason fake news has exploded on social media is that it is so easy for one to become fatigued or at least distracted and cognitively compromised by the never-ending avalanche of information.
An interesting study published in Nature Human Behaviour in 2017 suggests that people are more vulnerable to falling for fake stories when the flow of news becomes too great to pay close enough attention.
I find some reason for hope and optimism amid the current explosion of fake news we are experiencing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Three Ways You’re Still Onboarding New Hires All Wrong”

Your new hire’s first day usually involves a lot of paperwork, setting up passwords and logins, meeting new people whose names they’ll inevitably forget, and similar odds and ends.
The good news is that there are small changes you can make-no matter the size of your organization-to make new hires’ first few days as smooth and positive as possible.
New hires need to feel accountable right from the beginning.
Having a brief celebration can be a nice touch to make your new employee feel welcome.
Organizing a full-on lunch outing with everyone on your team can be a headache; sometimes it’s weeks before you’ll have a chance to do that with your new hire.
Many employers don’t realize that they’re dumping way too much information into new hires’ laps.
In the haste to bring people up to speed, they wind up trying to get new employees to learn everything about the company at once.
By using these strategies, you’ll make your new hires feel confident they made the right decision when they joined your team.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Future of the City Is Childless”

As the city has attracted more wealth, housing prices have soared alongside the skyscrapers, and young families have found staying put with school-age children more difficult.
There are many reasons New York might be shrinking, but most of them come down to the same unavoidable fact: Raising a family in the city is just too hard.
In high-density cities like San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C., no group is growing faster than rich college-educated whites without children, according to Census analysis by the economist Jed Kolko.
Cities were once a place for families of all classes.
The “Basic custom” of the American city, wrote the urbanist Sam Bass Warner, was a “Commitment to familialism.” Today’s cities are decidedly not for children, or for families who want children.
This development has crucial implications-not only for the future of American cities, but also for the future of the U.S. economy and American politics.
If big cities are shedding people, they’re growing in other ways-specifically, in wealth and workism.
Rich cities particularly specialize in the new tech economy: Just five counties account for about half of the nation’s internet and web-portal jobs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Learning to Cook the Indian Way”

Cooking from a cookbook never worked either-I was intimidated by the use of so many different ingredients, especially spices, many of which I’d never cooked with.
A lot of cookbooks I bought either contained westernized recipes or assumed a fluency in Indian cooking techniques that I didn’t possess.
She had all manner of tricks, including cooking chapatis directly on the gas flame until they puffed up and adding some water to a flipped-over frying pan lid, which she said helped cook vegetables by allowing condensation to drop back into the pan.
Our tiny apartment became a laboratory of Indian cooking.
We began to cook with the ceiling fans circulating the humid Mumbai air at gale-force levels.
Soon Pushpa became prideful about her food, suggesting new dishes and cooking things she’d never made.
On the last day of our stay in Mumbai, Pushpa didn’t let me cook.
I understand the basic principles of Indian cooking and can read between the lines in cookbooks, employing the techniques Pushpa taught me, which continue to bear fruit.

The orginal article.