Summary of “The New Teacher Project says low expectations hurt kids”

A new study from The New Teacher Project, a national nonprofit focused on teacher development and educational programming, aims to dispel this idea.
“They’re planning their futures on the belief that doing well in school creates opportunities-that showing up, doing the work, and meeting their teachers’ expectations will prepare them for what’s next,” the study notes, but something, along the way, is not working.
“As we visited classrooms around the country, we found teachers working hard individually to help their students, but we also saw pretty low-quality assignments kids were getting, and instruction that doesn’t give them a chance to do deep thinking and the type of work they’re going to need to do in order to succeed,” Weisberg says.
There’s no one cause for this gap, but one is low expectations on the part of teachers: Less than half surveyed by TNTP believe their students could work at grade level, so they assign them work that doesn’t require them to stretch.
Teachers themselves are not solely responsible for this problem: Teacher prep programs in the U.S., TNTP found, are often too focused on cookie-cutter curricula or standardized test scores, and doesn’t prepare them to lead nuanced and engaging lessons or deal with students as individuals.
“What we prioritize is operational efficiency-getting large volumes of kids through the system,” he adds, but The Opportunity Myth calls for an approach that not only gets kids through high school, but ensures that they succeed afterward.
Weisberg wants to start seeing teachers and schools re-engage with students’ experience of the work-are the engaged throughout the whole time in a classroom? Are they asking questions, or zoning out during a lecture that requires no participation?-and ensure that their lessons are pulling kids forward, not letting them stay stuck.
TNTP does not yet have a full set of recommendations for what exactly this new approach might look like-the organization compiled The Opportunity Myth to understand why so many kids were struggling, despite finishing high school, and their next step will be to build a system that ensures that they succeed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘School Choice’ and How High Schools Shaped the U.S.”

The high school still galvanized a shared, American society.
High schools can continue to do this, so long as they can resist being dismantled.
The public high school got its start in the early-19th century, when the education reformer Horace Mann-the “Father of the public school”-pressed for the establishment of “Common schools,” intended to provide a universal base of knowledge to be shared by all citizens, free of charge.
The public high school issued a challenge to the old classical curriculum of higher education and the vision of society it entailed.
Instead, many early high schools embraced a more practical curriculum, featuring literature, writing, science, and other modern subjects.
Communities still rallied behind their public high schools, convinced they would connect education to local and national prosperity.
Through the influence of the High School we have better lower schools, more thorough and efficient teachers, broader and more cultivated parents and citizens, better prepared to exercise the duties and privileges of citizenship.
Reflecting this shared sense of investment, locals called public high schools “Our schools,” and the students became not just children but “Our children.” Large public audiences attended performances, public examinations, and school ceremonies, which were also advertised and noticed in local newspapers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Is Harvard Trying to Hide?”

The secret deal gave the Education Department access to the tape and other sensitive internal Harvard information on two conditions: that the feds fight any FOIA request for the records and that they return them to Harvard at the conclusion of the investigation.
The investigators’ notes also showed that Harvard was willing to admit recruited athletes with academic profiles well short of Harvard’s usual standards.
“The disclosure of information that reveals-to an unprecedented degree-the inner workings of Harvard’s admissions process may harm Harvard not only by motivating applicants to modify their behavior to take advantage of that information, but also by disadvantaging Harvard in the extremely competitive market to recruit, admit, and enroll the most outstanding students across the world,” Harvard’s lawyers wrote in a June filing.
Harvard also complained that SFFA was essentially trying to dump the university’s files into the public domain, accusing the group of trying “Clutter the docket with irrelevant exhibits in an effort to make them public.”
“Disclosure of these documents would likely force Harvard to expend significant resources to dispel myths about its admissions process that emerge from erroneous third-party statistical analyses of these data,” Harvard attorneys argued.
Larew, who railed against Harvard’s legacy policy in the wake of the Education Department probe, insists that Harvard has frequently dissembled about and obscured its actions.
While it’s indisputable that Harvard fought my initial records request, Harvard’s admissions dean took a more moderate approach during the ensuing publicity.
A Harvard admissions office memo that appears to date to 2013 suggests that special treatment for alumni has eroded a bit, with the former practice of the admissions director reading all legacy applications now reined in to cases that “Might require special handling” or where doing so “Might be helpful.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Child marriage in the U.S. is surprisingly prevalent. Now states are passing laws to make it harder.”

Even in an era when the median age of marrying has climbed higher and higher, unions like Phil and Maria’s remain surprisingly prevalent in the United States.
“What do you think, Mama?” Phil finally asked, but his mother only shook her head. Maria wandered away with her son to play at the lake’s edge.
Phil met Maria on Feb. 25, 2017, in a trailer on the other side of Everett, where a buddy from jail was living.
A boy who would always and only know him as dad – not as Phil, or stepdad, but simply dad. So he’d been talking to Maria about it.
Maria? Maria had always been her responsible child, the one she could count on.
Lines blurred, family roles shifted: Was Maria the adult she often seemed, or the girl who still thought about prom, loved video games and sometimes needed mothering? And was Phil a “Pervert,” as she’d initially worried, or a husband who seemed to genuinely love Maria and was nothing but decent every time Michelle saw him?
Expression softening with sympathy, Michelle leaned forward, and, as her cigarette burned down to nothing and her other girls disappeared into the house, she stayed focused on the phone call, speaking not with Maria the mother, or Maria the wife, but Maria, her 16-year-old daughter.
Early one Friday morning, those concerns seemed remote, as Douglas and Phil slept side by side in the bedroom, and Michelle wrote her a Facebook message, telling her she was proud of her, and Maria headed out by herself for school, the child bride who didn’t drop out.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Rise and Fall of Affirmative Action”

Winifred Kao, a lawyer at the Asian Law Caucus, said that Blum was not “a champion for Asian-Americans, by any means.” Rather, he was “Using Asian-Americans as a wedge, as we’ve often been used, throughout our racial and civil-rights history.” Many of Blum’s critics point to a video in which he admits that he “Needed” Asian plaintiffs to pursue this latest challenge to affirmative action.
In the early nineties, Glynn Custred, an anthropologist at California State University, Hayward, who had told the Washington Post that affirmative action was like “Reversed Jim Crow,” met Tom Wood, a Ph.D. recipient who believed that affirmative action was the reason he could not find a professorship.
A survey from 2012 showed that Asian-Americans supported affirmative action by a three-to-one margin.
In 2016, OiYan Poon, an assistant professor of higher education at Colorado State University, interviewed thirty-six Asian-Americans who disagreed about affirmative action.
The opponents of affirmative action had so thoroughly dominated the terms of the debate that supporters were often unconsciously perpetuating a distorted vision of what actually happens-repeating claims that Harvard undervalued Asian students’ “Personalities,” for example, an argument that ignores the complexities of the “Personal” category.
Vincent Pan, the co-head of Chinese for Affirmative Action, told me that when he describes affirmative action in terms of employment opportunities, or hiring more Asian-American judges or college faculty, people overwhelmingly support it.
For previous generations of Asian-American activists, affirmative action was a key component in the struggle for multiracial justice.
The claims had been lodged by young, largely progressive Asian-American activists, for whom affirmative action was the solution to the problems they were identifying, not the cause.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lessons from the Last Swiss Finishing School”

Housed in a traditional chalet, built in 1911 for a Dutch baroness, the institute bills itself as the last finishing school in Switzerland.
“It’s the same as the watch industry,” Neri’s son, who tends to the school’s business matters, has said.
Though invited to spend a week attending classes, I was scolded on more than one occasion for photographing the chalet’s interior, for recording lectures, and for attempting to ascertain basic biographical facts about the school’s students, a group that Neri claims has included the daughters of Presidents and Prime Ministers.
One afternoon in an upstairs classroom, Neri told me, “My mother never liked the term ‘finishing school.’ It just means so many things to so many different people. The British, for example, think it’s a place for women too stupid to go to university.” Neri’s mother, Dorette Faillettaz, who never attended a finishing school, founded what became I.V.P. in 1954 with a loan from her parents, as no Swiss bank at the time would lend to a woman.
A translator of the Brothers Grimm and, according to Neri, “One of the first women to dare to ask for a divorce in Zurich,” Faillettaz established a school that was, for its time, a kind of proto-feminist alternative to the tea-party training occurring elsewhere around the canton.
“They would maybe go to England, because it’s a kingdom, but not to a peasant country.” Every so often, the school received what Neri referred to as “An exotic student”-once, she said, the school hosted a cousin of the Emperor of Japan.
Neri grew up in Zurich, attended school in England, moved to Montreux after her mother’s divorce, and then to California, where she majored in Latin-American studies at U.C.L.A. She returned to Switzerland after graduation and married the director of a textile-machine company.
In 1971, women in Switzerland gained the right to vote, and the following year Neri’s mother retired and Neri assumed leadership of I.V.P. “It was 1972!” she exclaimed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The American Dream Is Harder To Find In Some Neighborhoods”

The American Dream Is Harder To Find In Some Neighborhoods A new data tool finds a strong correlation between where people grew up and their chances of climbing the economic ladder.
Does the neighborhood you grow up in determine how far you move up the economic ladder?
At first glance, it looks a lot like a Google map, where users can see the whole country, or zoom in to local neighborhoods.
The difference is in the amount of data that pops up when a neighborhood is highlighted.
It’s located in a majority white neighborhood not far from downtown Charlotte, but the school’s population doesn’t reflect the neighborhood.
That’s because many white students attend private schools or public schools outside their neighborhoods.
The Sedgefield neighborhood is more affluent than a nearby majority black neighborhood called Southside Park.
Harvard’s Chetty says he hopes the Opportunity Atlas will help communities across the country revive the American dream in their neighborhoods.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Girls Are Better at Reading Than Boys”

It’s not just a phenomenon in the U.K.: These trends in girls’ dominance in reading can be found pretty much anywhere in the developed world.
In 2009, a global study of the academic performance of 15-year-olds found that, in all but one of the 65 participating countries, more girls than boys said they read for pleasure.
On average across the countries, only about half of boys said they read for enjoyment, compared to roughly three-quarters of girls.
Boys tend to be more vulnerable than girls to peer pressure, and that could discourage them from activities like reading that are perceived to be “Uncool.”
David Reilly, a psychologist and Ph.D. candidate at Australia’s Griffith University who co-authored a recent analysis on gender disparities in reading in the U.S., echoed these arguments, pointing to the stereotype that liking and excelling at reading is a feminine trait.
“Give boys the right literature, that appeals to their tastes and interests, and you can quickly see changes in reading attitudes,” he says, citing comic books as an example.
Understanding why girls are so much more inclined to read might help eradicate what is proving to be a stubborn gender gap both in the U.S. and around the world: the lagging educational outcomes of boys and men.
“If girls are reading more outside of school”-if they’re doing so out of an intrinsic motivation rather than because they have to-“This provides them with thousands of hours of additional reading over the course of their development.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Schools Are Banning Yoga”

In reality, school-based yoga typically focuses on physical exercise or on relaxation and mindfulness.
Other schools adopt yoga as an in- or after-school elective, while some incorporate it into regular PE classes.
“Many original forms of yoga are practiced in a religious or spiritual manner,” acknowledges Marlynn Wei, a psychiatrist, therapist, and certified yoga teacher who’s written about yoga’s educational uses.
“The minute you put Sanskrit into a curriculum some parents are going to freak out,” agrees Jai Sugrim, a yoga instructor who’s taught in schools.
What’s more, much of the research on school-based yoga focuses on its benefits for “Urban youth,” a high percentage of whom contend with trauma such as poverty, community violence, and exposure to drug abuse that takes a toll on their ability to manage stress.
In a state like Alabama, where school-based yoga has long been banned and where according to that same survey just 10 percent of the population has taken a class, it’s conceivable that many might see yoga as bizarre and inappropriate in a school setting.
Notably, the same survey found that many people who hadn’t tried yoga before perceived it to be exclusive to young women or those who are already flexible, athletic, or spiritual.
Ironically, proponents argue that the value of yoga in schools is its inclusiveness -its promise to help boys who don’t know how to contain their outbursts, students with physical disabilities, children who struggle with obesity, and teens who lack direction.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s How Millennials’ Lives Were Changed By Recession 10 Years Ago”

Many survived the foreclosure of homes, parents losing jobs, and years of fruitless job hunting after graduating school.
I’d say it’s impacted our lives in two ways: One, no matter how many times I took jobs that were outwardly vertical moves or increases in responsibility, my salary stayed pretty stagnant.
“Entry level” around here requires at minimum an associate’s degree and a couple years of experience – and that’s for jobs that literally anyone can do: office jobs, school support staffing, etc.
When the Great Recession hit 10 years ago, my clients were losing their jobs, homes, cars, etc.
My husband had a very difficult time finding a job out of college and worked internships and low-paying seasonal positions for years.
We struggled for three years to find a job that could feed us and lived off unemployment checks.
Once my dad had found a suitable job, it took us four years to get where we are today.
We have spent years working really low-wage jobs, sometimes multiple jobs.

The orginal article.